What Recipe Do You Use When People Ask For A "vanilla&q

Decorating By yelle66 Updated 14 Jun 2008 , 3:16pm by FromScratch

yelle66 Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 2:36am
post #1 of 11

Do you use a white cake recipe, a yellow cake recipe or a WASC? DO you ask them specifically what they mean or just use your own judgment?

10 replies
JoAnnB Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 4:55am
post #2 of 11

I ask if they prefer white or yellow. If they don't care which, yellow scratch cake is generally better than just white. WASC is almond not vanilla. many people do not like almond.

sassycleo Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 5:08am
post #3 of 11

I've had nothing but raves over the WASC. I also use the recipe for a base for a lot of my cakes. If you want vanilla and white. Make just as you would for WASC, substitue all vanilla for the almond. You can also use the Magic Line Butter Vanilla.

Or use french vanilla mix I've done that as well.

roxxxy_luvs_duff Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 5:08am
post #4 of 11

Buy the box mix that says "vanilla"? you could also use an extender recipe with it icon_smile.gif

FromScratch Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 5:23am
post #5 of 11

When someone requests vanilla cake I use my vanilla butter cake recipe which is a yellow cake. Usually when someone wants a white cake they will request a white cake. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 1:14pm
post #6 of 11

Ok...your topic line got cut off ... what's "vanilla and q"?

But deciphering from the above posts.... white, vanilla, it's all the same to me.

I worked with a lady who refused to say "white" cake because we didnt' say "black" cake. If the dark cake is called a flavor (chocolate), then the white cake should be called a flavor (vanilla). But what she meant was "white" cake.

Maybe it's regional ... maybe it's how it was referred to in their home growing up .... but around here, white and vanilla cake are the same.

My gosh, I can imagine the looks of confusion I'd get if I ask "do you want white cake or vanilla cake?" I will not turn into a Starbucks or a Panera Bread, where you have to learn a whole different language just to order a cup of coffee. More than once, I've answered the girl behind the counter with "I"m sorry ... I've no idea what that means." (Do I want my cappacino wet or dry? I want to DRINK it, not EAT it! What the he** is "wet or dry" when ordering freakin' coffee??????)

alicegop Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 1:34pm
post #7 of 11

I make all french vanilla. I don't offer white. White is white... but it is not as tasty, french vanilla has the whole egg in there so it is not white white.... but then again neither is my MMF so they go well together. Of course when I use sweetex my frosting is GLEEMING white, so I have to use a tiny bit of ivory to dull it down a little.

I don't tell them it isn't white white and I have never had a complaint. So it must be fine.

yelle66 Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 2:31pm
post #8 of 11

Indydebi, that is why I love you. You actually make me laugh out loud (not a lot of people can do that icon_wink.gif My sub line didn't actually get cut off, it was a question mark and somehow CC turned that into &q. Whatever. Hey, what's this I hear about you and your DH doing stand-up? That's awesome.

CakeWhizz Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 2:53pm
post #9 of 11

LOL!! Indydebi you rock!! Funnily enough there is a cake called 'black cake' and it is something of a specialty of the Carribean Islands. It's like a traditional British fruit cake, but with all or some of the fruit blended and it is laced with A LOT of rum.

marthajo1 Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 3:09pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi


My gosh, I can imagine the looks of confusion I'd get if I ask "do you want white cake or vanilla cake?" I will not turn into a Starbucks or a Panera Bread, where you have to learn a whole different language just to order a cup of coffee. More than once, I've answered the girl behind the counter with "I"m sorry ... I've no idea what that means." (Do I want my cappacino wet or dry? I want to DRINK it, not EAT it! What the he** is "wet or dry" when ordering freakin' coffee??????)





Okay seriously laughing out LOUD!! Too funny! What does that mean??

FromScratch Posted 14 Jun 2008 , 3:16pm
post #11 of 11

Hah.. that term always made me laugh..

A cappuccino is a mix of espresso, steamed milk, and frothed milk. A dry capp has less steamed milk and more froth and a wet capp has more steamed milk and less froth.

Ideally a cappuccino would be 1/3 espresso, 1/3 steamed milk, and 1/3 frothed milk.

The things they have to make you feel better about spending more for your coffee.. icon_lol.gif

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