Help Help Help!!

Decorating By sweettoothcakes Updated 13 Jun 2008 , 5:18pm by step0nmi

sweettoothcakes Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 2:32pm
post #1 of 15

I am trying to make a light TAN wedding cake for tomorrow!! I put in just a little brown and it gives me PINK!! What do I do. I am working with buttercream!!

14 replies
Michelle104 Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 2:46pm
post #2 of 15

try adding a little more brown...hth

sweettoothcakes Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:00pm
post #3 of 15

Yeah I tried that and it is still a peachy color. I am afraid to put too much in b/c she wanted it that light tan khaki color.

Anything else I can do

yellot Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:05pm
post #4 of 15

Try putting ivory in it.

moxey2000 Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:06pm
post #5 of 15

The color isn't true until it's set a little. It could also be the lighting in the room. If you're using brown coloring and it's very light then it's probably fine. Try looking at the color in different lighting.

Wendoger Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:07pm
post #6 of 15

Yes, a little ivory.....I started with ivory fondant and added brown for a khaki color....dunno if it'll work with bc but it turned out perfect for the fondant.

tatetart Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:07pm
post #7 of 15

Ivory will do the trick. I made a tan color by adding 1/3 ivory and 2/3 mauve.

PattyT Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:19pm
post #8 of 15

I Googled the phrase "how to mix colors to make brown". This came up with a lot of paint mixing, but here's what I found.
====

Primary colors are red, yellow and blue. Every other paint color that we use is derived by mixing these three paint colors in some way or another. Brown is one color that you can create by mixing all three primary colors. However, there are many other ways to get brown, and there are tricks to get the best quality color of paint.

Step1Refer to the color wheel. The color wheel will help you determine primary colors as well as secondary and tertiary colors. The colors you choose to mix will make different tones of brown, and the color wheel will help you as you make your selection.

Step2Mix one primary color with its complementary color. Red and green are complementary colors, so when you mix them together you get brown. Other complementary colors are orange and blue as well as purple and yellow.

Step3Add one secondary color to two primary colors. Mix yellow and blue paints to make green. Add red paint to that green paint to make brown.

Step4Find opposite colors on the color wheel. Mix the two opposites together to make brown paint.

Step5Combine orange paint with red paint. Mix them thoroughly, and then add a touch of black paint. This makes a deep brown paint that's very versatile.

Step6Darken your brown paint by adding a little bit of black paint to your mixture. You can also lighten your brown paint when you add white. This can make your brown paint the color of chocolate milk.

=====
The link to this is: http://www.ehow.com/how_2209641_mix-paint-colors-brown.html

I also think that Wilton has a color mixing chart.

ALSO: What about a little bit of light cocoa powder (Quick) mixed in?

Good luck - I know it's frustrating.

PattyT Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:19pm
post #9 of 15

I Googled the phrase "how to mix colors to make brown". This came up with a lot of paint mixing, but here's what I found.
====

Primary colors are red, yellow and blue. Every other paint color that we use is derived by mixing these three paint colors in some way or another. Brown is one color that you can create by mixing all three primary colors. However, there are many other ways to get brown, and there are tricks to get the best quality color of paint.

Step1Refer to the color wheel. The color wheel will help you determine primary colors as well as secondary and tertiary colors. The colors you choose to mix will make different tones of brown, and the color wheel will help you as you make your selection.

Step2Mix one primary color with its complementary color. Red and green are complementary colors, so when you mix them together you get brown. Other complementary colors are orange and blue as well as purple and yellow.

Step3Add one secondary color to two primary colors. Mix yellow and blue paints to make green. Add red paint to that green paint to make brown.

Step4Find opposite colors on the color wheel. Mix the two opposites together to make brown paint.

Step5Combine orange paint with red paint. Mix them thoroughly, and then add a touch of black paint. This makes a deep brown paint that's very versatile.

Step6Darken your brown paint by adding a little bit of black paint to your mixture. You can also lighten your brown paint when you add white. This can make your brown paint the color of chocolate milk.

=====
The link to this is: http://www.ehow.com/how_2209641_mix-paint-colors-brown.html

I also think that Wilton has a color mixing chart.

ALSO: What about a little bit of light cocoa powder (Quick) mixed in?

Good luck - I know it's frustrating.

step0nmi Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:28pm
post #10 of 15

ahhh! don't go by paint colors!!! they are not the same as gel or paste colors for cake decorating! there is different colors and properties to the stuff you use for food coloring...I found this out real quick.

yes, use the ivory.

PattyT Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:35pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by step0nmi

ahhh! don't go by paint colors!!! they are not the same as gel or paste colors for cake decorating! there is different colors and properties to the stuff you use for food coloring...I found this out real quick.

yes, use the ivory.




Ooops sorry....thought it would help. icon_redface.gif

step0nmi Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 3:38pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PattyT

Quote:
Originally Posted by step0nmi

ahhh! don't go by paint colors!!! they are not the same as gel or paste colors for cake decorating! there is different colors and properties to the stuff you use for food coloring...I found this out real quick.

yes, use the ivory.



Ooops sorry....thought it would help. icon_redface.gif




it's okay! sorry...I was hasty..thinking that the OP might see that...yeah it's kind of funky how that stuff is because my husband tried to tell me how to mix cake colors all the time...and it doesn't work the same as paints like it does for him....the ONLY one I found that works...is blue and red makes purple! LOL...and not a good one either! LOL

PattyT Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 4:16pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by step0nmi

Quote:
Originally Posted by PattyT

Quote:
Originally Posted by step0nmi

ahhh! don't go by paint colors!!! they are not the same as gel or paste colors for cake decorating! there is different colors and properties to the stuff you use for food coloring...I found this out real quick.

yes, use the ivory.



Ooops sorry....thought it would help. icon_redface.gif



it's okay! sorry...I was hasty..thinking that the OP might see that...yeah it's kind of funky how that stuff is because my husband tried to tell me how to mix cake colors all the time...and it doesn't work the same as paints like it does for him....the ONLY one I found that works...is blue and red makes purple! LOL...and not a good one either! LOL


(Tried to reply earlier - apologize if this double posts)

Thanks step0nmi for catching that. More proof that CC'ers look out for each other.

Tried to help as I was feeling very sympathetic. I had to make some tan/taupe fondant, and even the "warm brown" food color I bought was making it orangey.

sweettoothcakes Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 5:12pm
post #14 of 15

Thanks so much for all the responses!! The ivory did the trick!!! THanks again!! You guys are life savers icon_smile.gif

step0nmi Posted 13 Jun 2008 , 5:18pm
post #15 of 15

yaay!! icon_biggrin.gif

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