Why Gumpaste?????

Decorating By punkiin Updated 14 May 2008 , 5:32pm by tracycakes

punkiin Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:15pm
post #1 of 13

Okay! I asked someone a few days ago if Gumpaste was edible...and they said it is, but it dries rock hard and it would probably break a tooth. So my question is why do you use Gumpaste for decorations if it's not edible. I'm still new at this and my goal is to keep all the plastic off the cakes and make it all edible. Please share with me your experience with Gumpaste.

Cindy

12 replies
CakeDiva73 Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:20pm
post #2 of 13

Gumpaste is edible - that doesn't mean it tastes good, however. You can't make those gorgeous flowers and soften edges of petals and so many other things without using either gumpaste or fondant. So it satisfies the desire to use only 'edibles' on a cake (which I agree with).

Dragees were always on cakes and I think, at least they used to be technically edible but I always wondered what would happen to my teeth if I bit into them? icon_smile.gif If you want to stick with only good-tasting edibles, try using modeling chocolate for flowers and accents instead.

all4cake Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:34pm
post #3 of 13

I, me, myself, am not able to get the petals as thin with fondant as I am with gumpaste. I am able to get them thin with modeling chocolate but not as thin as with gumpaste. When I get as thin with straight fondant as I do with gumpaste, I wind up with limpy petals...and the humidity has a quicker effect on fondant than on gumpaste especially when trying to get it super thin.

I look at gumpaste like Necco wafers....incredibly hard almost tasteless ...but I still eat them.

sweetflowers Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:38pm
post #4 of 13

Gumpaste is edible, but I can't imagine breaking a tooth on a flower! It will break so easily if I just use my soft paintbrush too hard. However, my gumpaste flowers are wired and should not be eaten. If you are making a plague or figure.. then use the candy clay or fondant as CakeDiva suggested. The only reason I use gumpaste is for getting thin lifelike flowers.

all4cake Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:38pm
post #5 of 13

ribbon roses, and other whimsical looking flowers, fondant or modeling chocolate would be ideal for...
bow loops even if given enough drying time...

leah_s Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:38pm
post #6 of 13

Gumpaste is also handy when you forget icon_redface.gif to make a bow for a cake and it's due the next day. Add a little tylose and that sucker is ready to go in a few hours. Gumpaste dries quickly and holds it's shape. It is technically edible but doesn't taste good. (Just like Red Velvet cake IMO. Don't flame me. I just don't like that cake.)

Tootall Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:44pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Gumpaste is also handy when you forget icon_redface.gif to make a bow for a cake and it's due the next day. Add a little tylose and that sucker is ready to go in a few hours. Gumpaste dries quickly and holds it's shape. It is technically edible but doesn't taste good. (Just like Red Velvet cake IMO. Don't flame me. I just don't like that cake.)




icon_surprised.gif Don't like Red Velvet?? *flame, flame, flame* icon_lol.gif Just kidding. But I love the stuff! icon_biggrin.gif

punkiin Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:48pm
post #8 of 13

Thank you all so much! I'm wanting to make a big cake for my mother's 76 birthday next week and she loves flowers...so I'll have to try the gumpaste with fondant to see if I like it. I just love CC everyone is so helpful, nice, and PATIENT with us newbies. icon_biggrin.gif

cindy

leah_s Posted 13 May 2008 , 4:53pm
post #9 of 13

Tootall, you can have my portion!

awolf24 Posted 13 May 2008 , 5:31pm
post #10 of 13

You can use a mixture known as 50/50 - which, just as it sounds, is 50% fondant and 50% gumpaste. That way you get the benefits of both - more "edible" flavoring from the fondant but more stiffness, quicker drying time and ability to roll thinner, more precise designs with the addition of the gumpaste. It dries harder than plain fondant but not completely hard like 100% gumpaste would.

punkiin Posted 13 May 2008 , 9:11pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by awolf24

You can use a mixture known as 50/50 - which, just as it sounds, is 50% fondant and 50% gumpaste. That way you get the benefits of both - more "edible" flavoring from the fondant but more stiffness, quicker drying time and ability to roll thinner, more precise designs with the addition of the gumpaste. It dries harder than plain fondant but not completely hard like 100% gumpaste would.




Thank you awolf24!!!! I will try that....Could I mix Gumpaste and choco-pan????

awolf24 Posted 14 May 2008 , 1:33pm
post #12 of 13

I would think you could because Choco-pan IS fondant but since I have not used that brand personally, I can't say for sure.

tracycakes Posted 14 May 2008 , 5:32pm
post #13 of 13

I think it gives the ability to have all edible decorations , it gives you a chance to be creative and you can create exactly what you want. I hate the plastic decorations but I have them used in a pinch occasionally...very rarely.

But, I think a lot of it is personal choice. I have a co-worker who loves buttercream but hates fondant. She would be angry if I ever brought her a cake with fondant on it. I think she's going through the change and she gets grouchy. icon_redface.gificon_surprised.gificon_lol.gif We were just talking about that this morning. So, I would never bring her a cake decorated with fondant. But personally, I don't like any icing anymore, buttercream or fondant, so I just take it off anyway. So it wouldn't matter to me.

So, the great thing is that we do have lots of options in order to make everyone happy. icon_biggrin.gif

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