Teaching Other Than Wilton

Decorating By cakedesigner59 Updated 4 May 2008 , 3:28pm by cakedesigner59

cakedesigner59 Posted 3 May 2008 , 7:40pm
post #1 of 10

There was an ad in the Community College newsletter that said they needed cake decorating teachers for their continuning education classes (adults). I might be interested in this, but I don't particularly want to teach the Wilton method. I don't have anything against Wilton, I just do some things differently and I don't want to get tied into someone telling me the exact way I need to teach. Have any of you out there taught classes on your own, NOT the Wilton way? Any suggestions on a cirriculum, etc? As far as I can tell, that's one benefit of doing it their way, in that they would do all the prep (class outline, etc) for you.
I haven't called the college yet; was wanting to think this over first.

Thanks!

9 replies
pastryjen Posted 3 May 2008 , 11:30pm
post #2 of 10

I took a course through the recreation and parks department. I have no idea if this is Wilton but we never did that clown figure piping cake!

It started in the fall and our first cake was Thanksgiving (ours is in Oct) with fondant veggies in a horn of plenty, then halloween with ghosts and 3D pumpkins, we transfered a colouring book picture tracing with toothpicks, and filling in with star tip, chocolate clay roses on a chocolate ganache covered cake, we learned cornelli lace with butter cream roses and we used a string of beads as the bottom border. Each cake she would show us a different border. We molded chocolate one night. She also showed us some basic butter cream flowers and closer to Christmas we did poinsettias.

I redid the 1st level in the spring because there were different themes and we learned basket weave and way more flowers - carnations, sweet peas etc, we did a hat cake covered in fondant and made calla lilies from gum paste. We still did a toothpick transfer as well as learned roses again.

HTH a little.

cakedesigner59 Posted 3 May 2008 , 11:33pm
post #3 of 10

Thanks! Wow, that seems advanced for a beginner class. Was it for beginners?

pastryjen Posted 4 May 2008 , 12:53am
post #4 of 10

It was a beginners class and I think about 8 classes about 90 min each maybe 2 hrs. The first night she gave us recipes (crusting buttercream), simple syrup, told us how to crumb coat and mask. Gave us a few tips (ideas) and told us what to buy - tips, bags, dyes etc.

We brought in a cake if we wanted each week masked and ready to decorate then she'd walk us through it.

Petit-four Posted 4 May 2008 , 12:57am
post #5 of 10

Toba Garrett's The Well Decorated Cake is a reasonable price, and is an excellent "textbook" if you wanted to teach a community-college style course. It's about $14.95, though many places offer it for less.

Of course, the later stuff (like blown sugar) you might not get into much (or at all), but using the first several chapters and recipes is an excellent basis for a more far-ranging course than Wilton's model. You would likely end up spending less, even buying the book, because Garrett does not suggest buying all the stuff Wilton sells, which is of rather "limited" use once you are done with their courses.

chocolatecake Posted 4 May 2008 , 1:19am
post #6 of 10

Is this a class for hobbyists or people trying to build a foundation and eventual employment?

If it's for hobbyists I agree toba's book is great- teaches all different techniques with different nediums an artist/hobbyist would love

If it's a techical class for students hoping eventualy to work- the wilton method really does teach production piping skill that all bakery and supermarkets would hire

TandTHarrell Posted 4 May 2008 , 1:24am
post #7 of 10

I have also been thinking about teaching a cake decorating class. I live over seas, but I am so lost on how to get started. I just ordered the book, you suggested..

frosting111 Posted 4 May 2008 , 2:30am
post #8 of 10

I teach my own methods, Wilton has actually called me to teach for them but they seem too strict, and low pay, plus having to buy my own supply's, make icing and all the Wilton stuff one has to do to teach their course...

I do an Beginning Cake Decorating Class, a 8 week course, one night a week in the evenings 6-8:30pm on Mondays, for the moms to be able to be off work and have sitters for their children and such as, its more like a girls night out for them in a way...

I have my students bring their own supply's from home, and to buy the cake decorating kits I have specially made for them at two cake decorating store's I'm personal friends of the owners with...I also have them make what I call a practice icing to bring to each class and a cookie sheet to practice on, this way they can practice, scrape the icing back up, put in back in the bowl, reload it in the bag and use it all over again...I have them make a fresh batch at least every other class...

The first class, I teach about the cake tools we will be using and have them become acquainted with their decorating bags,doing pressure and release making stars using the # 18 Star tip, and then using the #4 open tip to practice writing...

The second class,I teach them to make shells,reverse shells,zig zags and ruffles

The third class,I have them bring a tube cake pan to practice on the sides of it making various garlands,dot division,and drop strings...

The forth class, we dedicate the entire class to making icing roses on the flower nail and wax paper...

The fifth class, I teach them to make Wild Roses,Daffodils, daises and how to shape the flowers on formers and the sides of the cookie sheet...also making sure they have the petal count right for each flower.

The sixth class, we do rose buds, chrysanthemums, leaves, vines,drop flowers and basket weaving...

The seventh class we do, diaper pins,rattles,bottles, marshmallow booties and clowns...

The eighth class, I have then bake a cake and a recipe of butter cream icing to bring it to class, I teach them how to apply and smooth out the icing, and let them decorate their cakes using the techniques they learnt in the previous class's...

I love teaching for the college, I set my own agenda, I teach the way I want to, using the techniques and methods I was taught by, I never have to pay for or bring supplys...and the pay is better per course.

If you like you can PM me for more details, HTH's,Mary

vteventrider Posted 4 May 2008 , 3:45am
post #9 of 10

Wow! The two courses described so far sound amazing. I wish I had courses like that here. Those would be about 3 different courses at places near me. I love the idea of the cookie sheet, I will need to do that here at home to keep practicing. Thanks!

cakedesigner59 Posted 4 May 2008 , 3:28pm
post #10 of 10

Wow, great ideas everyone! Thanks so much! I already have Toba Garrett's book, so I'll pull it out for reference. Frosting111, thanks so much for going into detail what you teach. Whew, it made me tired just reading all you do. That's a lot to teach. Your students are lucky, indeed.

You all have been very helpful!

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