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Is there a 'real' name for this recipe for 'frosting'?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
The other night I was looking for a new frosting/icing recipe to try... found one that was part of a cake recipe and listed simply as 'frosting' at the bottom of the cake recipe.

I LOVED the final result but was wondering if this frosting recipe has a 'better/real' name other then 'frosting'?

frosting ingredients:
1 cup milk
3 tbs flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup butter
1 tsp flavoring

directions: beat sugar with butter. heat milk with flour. cool. combine the two (and flavoring) and beat until light and fluffy.

Is this a recipe that anyone recognizes under another name?

It almost has the consistency of whipped cream when done (when at room temp). and since it's all butter it firms up hard when put into the fridge.

I've only used it on cupcakes so far but since it firms up (when chilled) i wonder if it can be used like IMBC or SMBC and firmed up to make nice crisp edges when applied to cakes??
post #2 of 25
I know this recipe - even used it several times. I'm not at home but I'll look it up. Seems like it has an odd name. icon_confused.gif
post #3 of 25
Wilton calls it French Buttercream Icing


http://www.wilton.com/recipe/French-Buttercream-Icing-1

Hope that helps.

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Quinte West, Ontario, Canada   www.TeriLovesCake.ca   Strictly Wheat & Gluten-Free         

 

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post #4 of 25
cooked flour frosting, i think. or old fashioned. let me look it up
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsGF

Wilton calls it French Buttercream Icing


http://www.wilton.com/recipe/French-Buttercream-Icing-1

Hope that helps.



Wilton is so wrong! French buttercream is like smbc or imbc except it uses yolks. The recipe is called Mary Kay frosting. I just made it last night, I always get raves!
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone!

I looked at the recipe on the Wilton site quoted above...the ingredients are the same but the proportions are different and the steps in the process are different... they may yield the same result but I'm not sure.
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone!

I looked at the recipe on the Wilton site quoted above...the ingredients are the same (except that wilton also adds salt) but the proportions are different and the steps in the process are different... but they probably yield the same result.

I noticed that the Wilton version says that you must refrigerate the icing (ie refrigerate the cupcakes you use it on)... why? is it to firm it up or because something will spoil if left out? if the latter, what will spoil? the butter should be good for at least a day or two considering the sugar content should it not? or are they worried about the milk? either way wouldn't the sugar content help things and thus you wouldn't need to refrigerate at least for a day? unless you are in a super hot climate or out in the sun on a mid summer day of course icon_wink.gif
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloetzu

Thanks everyone!

I looked at the recipe on the Wilton site quoted above...the ingredients are the same (except that wilton also adds salt) but the proportions are different and the steps in the process are different... but they probably yield the same result.

I noticed that the Wilton version says that you must refrigerate the icing (ie refrigerate the cupcakes you use it on)... why? is it to firm it up or because something will spoil if left out? if the latter, what will spoil? the butter should be good for at least a day or two considering the sugar content should it not? or are they worried about the milk? either way wouldn't the sugar content help things and thus you wouldn't need to refrigerate at least for a day? unless you are in a super hot climate or out in the sun on a mid summer day of course icon_wink.gif

I want to know, too! icon_biggrin.gif
post #9 of 25
Yep it's cooked flour/Mary Kay frosting. It is traditionally used to ice an RV cake, but it can be used for any cake. My husband's grandmother uses a similar recipe to ice her strawberry cake (DH strawberry). It's one of the best cakes in the world! I have left out slices of her cake for several days and never noticed a problem with the icing. You can use shortening too, but butter is the best.

Annie
post #10 of 25
Crazy question...does this recipe call for granulated sugar instead of powdered? I'd like to try it and need to know.
Linda
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Linda
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post #11 of 25
Toba Garrett's book refers to a similar recipe as "French Vanilla Buttercream"

http://www.sweetcelebrations.us/files/french_vanilla_buttercream_a_la_toba.pdf

i've also heard it called "custard frosting" or "heritage frosting"
post #12 of 25
Granulated. It will dissolve when you beat it.
post #13 of 25
This is called cooked flour frosting. The Bettercreme thread also calls this Mock Whipped Cream frosting.
post #14 of 25
I have also always heard it called cooked flour frosting. It was popular years ago. You will find this recipe in all of the popular mid-century cookbooks. In this buttercream, be sure not to rush it. Anthing with flour, such as a roux or a bechamel sauce, requires that the flour taste be cooked out. In my cooking experience, I have found the magic time to be 15 minutes. If it is made quickly, you will taste the raw flour.

I think naming it French buttercream is one of those names that tries to make something more basic sound more regal, like still calling a frosting buttercream when no butter was used at all.

This recipe has much more humble beginnings. It was a staple recipe in many family kitchens before the Crisco era took over and we lost so many great frostings due to this ingredient that was both more economical and easier to make.

This recipe is very good when cooked correctly.
post #15 of 25
I've made this many times, always knew it as Mock Whipped Cream. For anyone who does not like marshmallow filling in whoopie pies, this recipe is excellent.

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