Graduation Cake

Business By Porch21 Updated 16 May 2016 , 10:11pm by cakingandbaking

Porch21 Posted 15 May 2016 , 6:51pm
post #1 of 4

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How much should I charge for this cake if it add another tier?  It's going to be vanilla cake with buttercream frosting and fondant flowers and fondant hat.

3 replies
sayhellojana Posted 16 May 2016 , 2:02am
post #2 of 4

"How much should I charge" is a hard question to ask others. You need to look at your ingredient cost and estimate the amount of time you'll spend making it, decide how much to pay yourself per hour, and add it all up. Be generous with your time estimates. If you're delivering the cake, factor in that time and gas, too! 

yjflores1 Posted 16 May 2016 , 6:39am
post #3 of 4

I've struggled with charging as well because I'm new to baking and selling cakes but it's easier when you charge per serving ... At least to me then depending on the details added I would increase the price also including the cost of the materials and ingredients used.I'm still working on my pricing but please go with your gut don't feel bad to charge "too much" for a cake I've made the mistake a few times of undercharging and I hated it because you burn yourself out! HTH

cakingandbaking Posted 16 May 2016 , 10:11pm
post #4 of 4

In the past, every time I priced a cake, I usually ended up undercharging because every cake ALWAYS took longer than I thought it would, so I've learned to charge for at least 2-3 more hours of labor than I think it will take. Additionally, I recommend sitting down and calculating the exact cost of ingredients for one of your basic cakes (for example, a 6-in tall, 9-in round vanilla cake with vanilla buttercream filling and frosting). That will give you a good jumping off point so you'll know how to charge from there when customers want intricate designs, special flavors, etc.

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