Getting Rid Of Shiny Fondant

Sugar Work By mkruger0717 Updated 27 Jan 2016 , 6:52pm by Pastrybaglady

mkruger0717 Posted 1 Jan 2016 , 4:09am
post #1 of 6

I haven't been using fondant very long and I have a reoccurring problem...shiny fondant. I don't want it to be shiny - it just looks wet. I am getting ready to make my daughter's jungle cake and I don't want the animals to be shiny. 

I am using the store bought fondant by Wilton and am then just rolling it out. Any advice would be welcome. 

Thank you 


5 replies
costumeczar Posted 1 Jan 2016 , 4:00pm
post #2 of 6

Are you refrigerating it? If you are and then you take it out it will look shiny for a while as the condensation happens on it, but it will dry out eventually. If it's just shiny while you're working with it you could try adding some corn starch, but that could dry it out too much.

LouisNutri Posted 3 Jan 2016 , 12:48am
post #3 of 6

@costumeczar  I keep my fondant-covered cakes in a plastic cake packaging that's very airtight, I also keep it refrigerated; should I remove the lid/cover of the packaging when I take it out of the fridge for the condensation to disappear or would it be okay to keep the lid/cover on?

costumeczar Posted 3 Jan 2016 , 3:09am
post #4 of 6

I've heard that people who leave it in a box leave it until it warms up, that way the condensation forms on the box, not on the cake. 

I've had gumpaste flowers melt when I put the cake in an airtight container, though. It was buttercream, and I think that the moisture from the icing recirculated and got into the gumpaste, so be careful with the airtight packaging! Sometimes it's better to store things in a box that's not completely airtight, but I guess it depends on a few factors.

Showstoppers Posted 3 Jan 2016 , 10:50am
post #5 of 6

Is it shiny all over or just in patches? Are we talking 2D or 3D characters? What are you using to join your pieces and what are you using to dust the surface when you roll out the fondant? Sorry for all the questions, but it's the only way to find an answer! 

I sometimes get shiny patches on my cake where my adhesive brush may have slipped, but not all over the surface.

If you are using icing sugar to "dust" your surface this may well be the problem. Maybe try investing in a "blush brush" style brush and lightly dust your finished pieces with some cornflour. I wouldn't put them in containers until they were dried out. a layer of salt at the bottom of the container, followed by several pieces of kitchen towel to separate the salt from the pieces keeps the inside of your container moisture free if condensation is the problem x

www.showstoppersdecorations.co.uk

Pastrybaglady Posted 3 Jan 2016 , 5:35pm
post #6 of 6

I've had problems with this when I've put the cake in a plastic container, but not in a cardboard box. Even when left out at room temp.  I think fondant needs to "breathe".

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%