mixaleena Posted 22 Sep 2005 , 5:08pm
post #1 of

Short of buying some tool...what can I use to cut the Wilton dowel rods safely and easily so that I get consistent results? Help!

I struggle with this, I wanted to use straws (easier to cut) but I read that they aren't very sturdy.

The cakes will be approx 4" height and 12", 10" & 8" (and possibly 6" on top) round. They will be transported seperately and then assembled on site. What do you all recommend? (This is for October 1st.)

Thanks so much!

17 replies
justsweet Posted 22 Sep 2005 , 5:13pm
post #2 of

When I took my wilton class we were told just buy a cutting shears. They work great, you can get them for $9 and just keep them with your cake decorating stuff becuase you do not want to use one that has been cutting plants. - good luck - icon_biggrin.gif

MrsMissey Posted 22 Sep 2005 , 5:31pm
post #3 of

I found small pruning shears at our hardware store..they work great!

Sangria Posted 22 Sep 2005 , 7:29pm
post #4 of

I stole some huge wicked looking thing from my boyfriends toolbox. He hasn't missed it, yet. : )

I think they are like pruning shears. A tip. Once you get to right before you cut, throw a towel over the shears and the rod, or it will go flying.

Hardware stores sell small mider boxes for about $15.00. That might be another option.

mixaleena Posted 23 Sep 2005 , 7:27pm
post #5 of

Are there any alternatives to dowel rods for this application?

sunlover00 Posted 24 Sep 2005 , 10:41pm
post #6 of

Wilton also make things that are plastic tubes. They are a little smaller than one inch diameter.

Cons: More expensive and less of them in the bag. Basically, you need more of them per cake.
Pros: Easier to cut with a big knife; maybe a bit more stable due to the diameter.

I just use the dowel rods and use garden shears as the others mentioned. Then I file them off with a rough emery board so that there are no splinters.

alimonkey Posted 24 Sep 2005 , 10:48pm
post #7 of

I use pruning shears then file the ends as well.

I have heard of people using bubble tea straws. They are 1/2" in diameter and made from thicker plastic. They're cheap, and easy to cut. I may have to give it a try myself, but I don't make that many tiered cakes yet.

Here's a link to order info.
http://www.bubbleteasupply.com/store/store.php3?item_id=2

Ali

ajoycake Posted 24 Sep 2005 , 10:48pm
post #8 of

I also use the plastic tube things that wilton makes. I find that they cut kinda hard with a knife but I really love the surport they give. Very give great surport

mixaleena Posted 25 Sep 2005 , 1:58am
post #9 of

Anyone know where I can get my hands on these bubble tea straws to actually pick up, like a Michael's or something?...I don't know if I can trust any online place to get them to me quick enough (I would need them by Friday). And don't they eat up alot of the cake then, being 1/2 inch thick?

I like the sound of these though...I just don't like the wooden dowel rod thing...it bugs me from all angles.

Thanks
Mixee

alimonkey Posted 25 Sep 2005 , 1:59am

I'll bet if you go to a place that sells bubble tea, they'd give you some extra if you bought a tea. Don't know if you have anyplace like that, though.

Ali

dandelion Posted 25 Sep 2005 , 2:19am

You can buy bubble tea straws at any Chinese supermarket.
Where I live, there is a bubble tea store within 5 minutes of anywhere! icon_biggrin.gif
Good luck with your cake!

mixaleena Posted 25 Sep 2005 , 4:12pm

Hey..hopefully someone that knows will be here before 3 o'clock central time...LOL...

Anyone know if Giant Straws would work just the same as the bubble tea straws? I guess they are just the same material as regular straws, but they are bigger in diameter...?

Thanks.
Mixee

Gingoodies Posted 25 Sep 2005 , 4:24pm

Mixaleena.. with the sizes of the cakes you are stacking I would use the wooden dowel. Personally I would be so afraid that plastic straws (of any diameter) would not hold all that weight. I picked up a small hacksaw at my local hardware store for about $5 and use that to cut my dowels. Then just sand the edges smooth.

littlebubbieschocolates Posted 25 Sep 2005 , 8:30pm

i just use garden clippers that i got at a dollar store

Janzcakes Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 3:24am

I read somewhere to use a brand new dog toenail clipper and it works great! I don't even own a dog but went out and picked up one. Sure enough you place your wooden dowel into it and the slicer comes down on it and cuts it clean. Much better than sawing with a small blade or struglling with some shears in my opinion.

Janzcakes Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 3:25am

I read somewhere to use a brand new dog toenail clipper and it works great! I don't even own a dog but went out and picked up one. Sure enough you place your wooden dowel into it and the slicer comes down on it and cuts it clean. Much better than sawing with a small blade or struglling with some shears in my opinion.

Janzcakes Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 3:26am

I read somewhere to use a brand new dog toenail clipper and it works great! I don't even own a dog but went out and picked up one. Sure enough you place your wooden dowel into it and the slicer comes down on it and cuts it clean. Much better than sawing with a small blade or struglling with some shears in my opinion.

mixaleena Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 3:46am

The shears did work for me, the only catch was that it smashed the wood down at the end into more of an elliptical shape rather than the round shape it started off with.
Actually for this cake that we are doing for tomorrow we decided to go another route but it worked out...I think...won't know for sure until tomorrow when the cake is actually set up...pray for us!

Thanks all!
Mixee

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