What Is This Technique?

Decorating By SweetDreams98 Updated 26 Nov 2014 , 3:01am by SweetDreams98

SweetDreams98 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 5:30am
post #1 of 23

I had a bride send me this picture, I'm not sure who did the cake (it's from Pinterestland of course) but I can't figure out what was used for the silver layers...Edible glitter?  I've ruled out dragees of course.  One of my friends suggested maybe gelatin sequins?  I love the look but just can't figure out what was used!

TIA!*

22 replies
mattyeatscakes Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 5:49am
post #2 of 23

AJust popping by to say that this gorgeous cake was created by the very talented Jenna Rae Cakes :) i follow her on instagram

SweetDreams98 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 6:32am
post #3 of 23

Thank you so much mattyeatscakes!  I could have done a reverse image search but...I was lazy.  I will have to follow her as well, it's gorgeous!

SweetDreams98 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 6:38am
post #4 of 23

http://thecakeblog.com/gold-sequin-cake-tutorial

I NEVER would have guessed this is how it was done!

remnant3333 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 11:06am
post #5 of 23


Is this gold stuff really safe to eat? Just wondering?

doramoreno62 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 3:28pm
post #6 of 23

Yikes! I don't know if I would like to chew thru all that confetti spackled with gold

:-t

denetteb Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 3:40pm
post #7 of 23

Could you do those two tiers on dummies or foam and have those two tiers be not edible?

SweetDreams98 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 3:52pm
post #8 of 23

AYes, some isn't but it will say not for consumption

SweetDreams98 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 3:57pm
post #9 of 23

AYou COULD do them on dummies but I see nothing different than doing a tier covered in drageés, you tell people to peel that part off. Those type of confetti sprinkles are commonly used on grocery store birthday cakes also, they're not hard like a drageé would be (that was my other option was a drageé covered tier so this would actually be better for eating). It's obviously whatever you feel comfortable doing though.

Dayti Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 8:07pm
post #10 of 23

It's totally edible if you use edible lustre/paint. Whether you would want/like to eat it depends on each person, but it can always be left on the plate, much like some people don't eat fondant or munch through a load of gumpaste ruffles or wafer paper peonies. 

SweetDreams98 Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 10:24pm
post #11 of 23

AWell said dayti, my thoughts exactly, the bottom tier is a double barrel ruffle tier lol

daisybee Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 11:09pm
post #12 of 23

AHi there,

Yes they are edible sequins. I saw on the internet that you could use kara couture method (if i remember well) to make them out of gelatin but you can also make them with a circle cutter or with confettis.

SweetDreams98 Posted 24 Nov 2014 , 4:25am
post #13 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by daisybee 

Hi there,

Yes they are edible sequins. I saw on the internet that you could use kara couture method (if i remember well) to make them out of gelatin but you can also make them with a circle cutter or with confettis.


Daisybee, check out the link to the tutorial I posted, they're actually not edible sequins, they're just confetti sprinkles hand painted gold!

Artbynella Posted 24 Nov 2014 , 5:55am
post #15 of 23

THAT IS!!! THANKS A LOT!!! :)

SweetDreams98 Posted 24 Nov 2014 , 7:17am
post #16 of 23

AFor research purposes I ate some of the sprinkles. I've always been in the "more the merrier" camp when it comes to sprinkles so it wouldn't bother me personally to eat the sprinkle laden fondant lol

daisybee Posted 24 Nov 2014 , 9:35pm
post #17 of 23

[email protected], Sorry i didnt see (excuse my horrible english) the link when i posted my comment, Yes i remember i had seen this tutorial, i think it s the easiest way to get the edible sequins.

If i had to i would go for this one

rexygirl Posted 25 Nov 2014 , 3:38am
post #18 of 23

AThat tutorial just blew my mind!! I'm totally using that on an upcoming purse cake!!

SweetDreams98 Posted 25 Nov 2014 , 5:30pm
post #19 of 23

A

Original message sent by rexygirl

That tutorial just blew my mind!! I'm totally using that on an upcoming purse cake!!

I know right? I love your name by the way, my youngest son's name is Rex and we call him Rexy all the time :). I'm going to use this technique on a wedding cake in 2 weeks!

costumeczar Posted 25 Nov 2014 , 6:05pm
post #20 of 23

Just warn whoever is going to cut the cake that the outside is going to be less than appetizing for most people. They might want to leave those tiers to be served last if needed. A lot of the designs that are going around now are more for looks than for eating.

rexygirl Posted 25 Nov 2014 , 11:34pm
post #21 of 23

A

Original message sent by SweetDreams98

I know right? I love your name by the way, my youngest son's name is Rex and we call him Rexy all the time :). I'm going to use this technique on a wedding cake in 2 weeks!

Thanks!! I love rex now not as much as a kid... A girl named rex....yea kids and adults were confused by my name:) and yea costumeczar I totally agree I think I'm gonna do it on a layer that is gonna be rkt so won't be getting cut

lyndim Posted 26 Nov 2014 , 1:09am
post #22 of 23

ASo gonna try this! :grin:

SweetDreams98 Posted 26 Nov 2014 , 3:01am
post #23 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by rexygirl 


Thanks!! I love rex now not as much as a kid... A girl named rex....yea kids and adults were confused by my name:) and yea costumeczar I totally agree I think I'm gonna do it on a layer that is gonna be rkt so won't be getting cut


I love the name for boy or girl but then again, I'm a Sarah so I hated my plain name lol  My oldest is Tristan, we call him "T" for short so we have T and Rex.  They'll be able to decorate a cake and have a good sense of humor if nothing else lol

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