Ac Temperature?

Business By kellierae Updated 7 Jun 2014 , 12:50am by morganchampagne

kellierae Posted 6 Jun 2014 , 4:23am
post #1 of 7

AWhat temperature should I set my AC at in my home when working on a cake? I live in phoenix so it's pretty unreasonable to run it any lower than 78deg. I'm just worried that 78 might be too warm. Does any body have any suggestions? Thanks!

6 replies
SimplySix Posted 6 Jun 2014 , 11:22am
post #2 of 7


I live up by Kansas City but don't do temperatures above about 68 degrees. Period. (I like to keep my A/C between 65-67). In the last month my RI has become so difficult to work with & in all of the 1000+ places that I have searched for answers it is commonly suggested that it is either too humid or not stiff enough (It's not the latter, I assure you!).. I'm relatively new to some of this and have wondered how bad the humidity levels could be in my house that is shut up and has central a/c..  I've switched back to buttercream frostings for now and while they, too, seem to be effected- I find that if I whip out 3-6 roses (as an example) and then set them in the freezer for 15-20 minutes before doing more (I just keep in that rotation) that they keep and are relatively unaffected in handling (place them before letting them melt!). And it's only the stiffer consistencies that seem to have all the trouble. Once they are placed and given a chance to crust they seem to be doing fine. I've read in many places that if you add cornstarch it will help icings hold and help keep colors from running. The same being said of a 50-50 cornstarch/confectioners sugar mix. If I go that route I use cornstarch or cream of tarter. My cakes, unfrosted, keep well in Tupperware but once you've frosted them then it's too much moisture for it to be sealed. And if I intend to have them set out for anymore than 16 hours then I'll use 50% of whatever fat the recipe calls for and replace the other 50% with canned apricot mush or pineapple. I find that sour cream (even full fat) doesn't work as well with the rising temp & humidity here. Yogurt, however, does just fine.

             Don't know if any of what I"ve said will help since you're in a drier, hotter, climate.. but I hope so. Oh- the summer I lived in Kingman, Az I found that if I filled my swamp cooler to the brim with ice and set my work table right in front of it that the cooled breeze would help... it just doesn't last long w/o that cool breeze- the buttercream, I mean.

kellierae Posted 6 Jun 2014 , 1:26pm
post #3 of 7

AMy electric bill would be outrageous if I kept it that low! It was almost $200 last month and I kept it at 75. Now that it's 110 outside, I can't afford to keep it that low. Fortunately we don't have a problem with humidity here like in Kansas. I lived in Wichita for a year and boy that was humid! I'm working on a cake now and have kept my AC at 78. I will be covering with fondant tonight and doing final decorations tomorrow morning before the delivery. I guess I will find out by trial and error! I just hate learning the hard way within 24hrs of a delivery :) I made a bow last night and so far so go, it's hardening up nicely, but does seem to be taking a little longer to set up than when my AC was lower past month.

lorieleann Posted 6 Jun 2014 , 11:25pm
post #4 of 7

i'm in tucson and keep my AC at 78 normally, but when I am baking I plan on taking the hit and put it to 75.  Unless absolutely necessary, I try to avoid having ovens on from 11-8 when the AC would have to work the hardest.  I also keep everything in the fridge because humidity isn't an issue for us, so the dip in the temp is usually only when the cake is baking (though it is warmer b/c of the oven heat), or when I am assembling. 

kellierae Posted 6 Jun 2014 , 11:27pm
post #5 of 7

A

Original message sent by lorieleann

i'm in tucson and keep my AC at 78 normally, but when I am baking I plan on taking the hit and put it to 75.  Unless absolutely necessary, I try to avoid having ovens on from 11-8 when the AC would have to work the hardest.  I also keep everything in the fridge because humidity isn't an issue for us, so the dip in the temp is usually only when the cake is baking (though it is warmer b/c of the oven heat), or when I am assembling. 

That's very helpful and makes me feel better about keeping it at 78! Thanks!!

AZCouture Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 12:21am
post #6 of 7

AHotter part of AZ here, than your Phoenix is. :D I have no earthly idea what I run it at when it's super hot, but cool enough to work with SMBC in my studio, and be comfortable. I cannot work period if I'm hot, it just grosses me out. But to be somewhat frugal, I don't bake unless it's very early in the morning, or after 9pm on weekdays, during the hottest months. Not sure which electric company you're with, but APS has two.plans we take advantage of. 9 to 9, where you don't use a lot of electricity between 9 am and 9pm on weekdays, and Equalizer, which averages out your bill over a year, and you pay the same amount each month, rather than get slammed with higher bills during the hot months.

morganchampagne Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 12:50am
post #7 of 7

AI live in Houston, Texas. It's ridiculously hot here already. I keep the ac on 72-73 it's not too cold but and it keeps me from sweating when I work lol

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