What Size Cake Do I Need.

Decorating By Danielle Mc Updated 3 Jun 2014 , 8:10pm by Danielle Mc

Danielle Mc Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 5:32am
post #1 of 11

ASomeone please help, I was asked to do a graduation cake to feed 125 people. What size cake will I need and how much should I charge? I will be a buttercream frosting.

10 replies
AZCouture Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 5:40am
post #2 of 11

AGoogle Wilton cake serving chart, and print it out, save it, something. Start adding up the tiers, what combination makes what, what will visually be appealing, what will work with what pans you already have versus what you may need to buy.

You want to know what we would charge? I'd charge at least $600 probably. But...I have no clue how you're decorating it. How can I possibly tell you what to charge if I have no clue what it's supposed to look like, or how similar our decorating skills are. Maybe you use box mixes and shortening based buttercream. That affects the price, as would scratch baking and making a butter heavy recipe (read: expensive).

carmijok Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 6:38am
post #3 of 11

AI'm just curious as to why you accepted such a large cake if you are not familiar with how to configure sizes. Is this something someone dumped on you...like "I'll bring the potato salad and you can bring the cake" type of thing?

Danielle Mc Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 8:28am
post #4 of 11

AWell I never accepted any thing. I just assumed that this was a forum where I can Ask a question about something that I was unfamiliar with. Before accepted anything. And it wasn't that it was just dumped on me I was just looking for answer.....

carmijok Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 12:36pm
post #5 of 11

A

Original message sent by Danielle Mc

Well I never accepted any thing. I just assumed that this was a forum where I can Ask a question about something that I was unfamiliar with. Before accepted anything. And it wasn't that it was just dumped on me I was just looking for answer.....

It is....that's why I asked you whether or not this was something you were asked to do because if you were not familiar with the caking world in general I was going to suggest doing something like full sheets to keep it simple and give you the quantity that you needed. Sometimes more information is needed in order to give helpful answers.

Danielle Mc Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 1:59pm
post #6 of 11

A

Original message sent by carmijok

It is....that's why I asked you whether or not this was something you were asked to do because if you were not familiar with the caking world in general I was going to suggest doing something like full sheets to keep it simple and give you the quantity that you needed. Sometimes more information is needed in order to give helpful answers.

Your right I should have given more info. Yes this is all new to me I'm Currently taking cake decorating classes and so far I know the cake decorating basics. But I do make all my cakes from scratch.

carmijok Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 3:22pm
post #7 of 11

AWell if you're new, then obviously you'll want to keep it pretty simple so it will be easier for you to learn as you go and still look good. Did you have a design in mind?

Danielle Mc Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 6:02pm
post #8 of 11

AI was still trying to brainstorm i now I was going to do a graduation cap in a butter cream transfer. Do you have any suggestions

carmijok Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 7:25pm
post #9 of 11

ASo It's just the image you want help on? Because if it is I have no experience with bc transfers. Most all my cakes are covered in bc and I use fondant or gum paste for decor. If you just want to make a cap image, instead of buying fondant you could get a wilton black icing sheet and use a template downloaded from the internet (just google search 'graduation cap' in images) and then cut it out.

pastrypet Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 7:46pm
post #10 of 11

You could also search on "mortarboard" (graduation hat's real name).

Danielle Mc Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 8:10pm
post #11 of 11

AOk. Thanks everyone

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