Serving Charts

Business By Paperfishies Updated 9 Jan 2014 , 6:58pm by Phaedramax

Paperfishies Posted 7 Jan 2014 , 10:40pm
post #1 of 44

What serving charts do y'all use?

 

I am finding that people in my area, when you mention 1X2 servings they look at you like you're trying to starve them.  I always provide a cutting/serving guide during consultations and then again when I deliver. 

 

Do any of you just do straight 2X2 servings no matter the cake?

 

What serving charts do you use?

43 replies
-K8memphis Posted 7 Jan 2014 , 10:55pm
post #2 of 44

the serving size is 1x2x4

 

so an idea is to say --it's approx the size of a cupcake plus fillings--

 

or get a piece of foam this size--even decorate it to mimic a slice of cake--just to show that is a most reasonable serving size--

 

i use wilton's wedding cake --chart

 

so it sounds like you need to convince yourself first ;)

Paperfishies Posted 7 Jan 2014 , 11:11pm
post #3 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 
 

the serving size is 1x2x4

 

so an idea is to say --it's approx the size of a cupcake plus fillings--

 

or get a piece of foam this size--even decorate it to mimic a slice of cake--just to show that is a most reasonable serving size--

 

i use wilton's wedding cake --chart

 

so it sounds like you need to convince yourself first ;)


I thought the 4 was always a given...

 

Honestly, I think that it's a small serving of cake...Of course I would love to go by those 1X2X4 servings, it means more money.

 

I had a bride tell me she needed a cake to serve 70...So, I did 6,8,10 round for 74 servings (via the wilton serving chart).  I provided her with a cutting chart when I made the delivery...She ended up emailing me telling me that they ran out of cake for 65 people.

 

I don't want people to be disappointed, or to feel as though they didn't get what they paid for, even though *I* know they are getting what they're paying for.

 

I'm wondering how many people do 2X2X4 as their standard, across the board servings for all cakes?  Because it seems like in my area local bakeries don't even go by the wilton standard.

Chellescakes Posted 7 Jan 2014 , 11:52pm
post #4 of 44

AI give a choice of three different serving sizes,and charge for the number of the one by two slices in the cake

Sassyzan Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 1:13am
post #5 of 44

AI use 1x2x4 and give them a cutting chart. If they want to serve or eat bigger slices, they have to order more servings.

I think it is plenty of cake. The only time I'd advise ordering more is if it was a cake-only reception or if they're ordering more than 2 flavors, ESP of cupcakes. Having More flavors encourages people to try more!

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 3:20am
post #6 of 44

nothing is a given i don't think--bottom line, paperfishies, it's up to you to educate your client on what to expect from your product--

 

i build in an average of 10-15 servings into most every tier cake so there's a little wiggle room for dowel rods knocking out a few servings, they are my peace of mind servings--i never tell the client--

 

did your bride serve the entire cake or did she reserve the top tier for the anniversary?

 

y'know when you bake a cake in a 9" pan you then have an 8.5 inch cake to ice--so there's that too--the cake itself is not fully 9"--it shrinks 1/2" to an 1"--so...sometimes i'll bake a 10" cake to make a 9" tier--i shave off the sides a bit anyhow so it helps when i'm ensuring i have more than enough servings--

 

but it's up to you to tell them how it all works--at the consult i tell them that if they want bigger servings they need to buy more cake--that if they get aunt louise's 13 yr old twins to cut the cake they need to buy more servings--that she needs a real responsible person to cut it or she will not get her servings--

 

the last cake i did--the caterers cut the cake to per.fec.tion--it was fun to watch them--fast and efficient

 

another thing--this is expensive cake--it needs to cut clean and not crumble so all the servings are available--not that yours isn't--i'm just saying--and that's what i tell the brides too-1x2x4 is industry standard size--it fills a cake plate comfortably--you (the bride) wanna be generous with your expensive dessert no problem :lol: i've been to events where the cake was cut so thin you could see the china pattern on the plate--not my problem--

 

fwiw--one more thought--i deliver two 4 inch cakes tidily boxed up in cute little 6" boxes with every wedding cake i make (for every bride that didn't piss me off hahaha) an anniversary cake and a honeymoon cake just made from leftover batter or from trimmings--so that's an extra few servings too if it ever came down to it--plus it's a great selling point when i tell the bride she gets to serve her whole tier cake and these two are my gifts to them--

 

so...cake servings a discourse by acmecakes

Godot Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 3:25am
post #7 of 44

AEvery cake that goes out the door gets written instructions plus a cutting chart. I always explain that while they are welcome to cut the cake however they want - if they want the amount of servings we agreed upon they need to follow the chart.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:14am
post #8 of 44

I use Wilton, and I have examples made of a paper print out I found on here ages ago to show the size. If they want more, they can order more.
A 1"x"2"x4" is a generous piece of cake, I do a follow up with most of my brides and I have never once heard that there wasn't enough.
I also send out a cutting guide, but venues tend to do things their own way.

 

As far as cakes shrinking, I have never heard of that.

kikiandkyle Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:15am
post #9 of 44

AYou can give them whatever size you want so long as you are charging the appropriate amount. 1x2x4 is the basis for most pricing policies, if you're giving 2x2x4 then you need to charge twice as much per serving as you would for the standard size serving.

costumeczar Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:25am
post #10 of 44

ADon't sell yourself short because people are greedy. I wrote this last year, i can't believe it was that long ago, I'm old and time is passing faster. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2013/02/tell-me-about-those-serving-sizes-again.html

Bakers Crush Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:33am
post #11 of 44

AI think the key to what everyone is saying to you is let them know up front. Customers do not know the inch size of industry standards. They are used to cutting birthdays cakes for years and years with huge slices. It will be a big shock if they get a smaller cake than they thought. We give out cakes a bit bigger than industry standards and still people still think its too small. You can also let people know the cake sizes youre using and ask if they want to upgrade to the next serving size.

cakefat Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:34am
post #12 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 

Don't sell yourself short because people are greedy. I wrote this last year, i can't believe it was that long ago, I'm old and time is passing faster. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2013/02/tell-me-about-those-serving-sizes-again.html

 

Very true...good analogy in your blog too.

 

Easy to understand why obesity is an epidemic when they want to 'biggie size' their cake slices. 

cakefat Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:34am
post #13 of 44

Very true...good analogy in your blog too.

 

Easy to understand why obesity is an epidemic when they want to 'biggie size' their wedding cake slices. 

howsweet Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 4:47am
post #14 of 44

ALike K8 said above, it's up to you to make sure you're communicating with the customer. The first time I mention servings, I always say "up to X number event style servings which are 1x2x4". If they are having 32 guests for a 32 serving cake, I make sure they know cutting 32 servings will require precision and advise extra servings.

Paperfishies Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 5:07am
post #15 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bakers Crush 

I think the key to what everyone is saying to you is let them know up front. Customers do not know the inch size of industry standards. They are used to cutting birthdays cakes for years and years with huge slices. It will be a big shock if they get a smaller cake than they thought. We give out cakes a bit bigger than industry standards and still people still think its too small. You can also let people know the cake sizes youre using and ask if they want to upgrade to the next serving size.


I do...At every consultation, I give each bride a folder with information, one of the pages of info is a serving chart that I go over with her.  Then when I deliver the cake I also give another serving chart.  Then again, I live in Kentucky and large servings of everything are the norm here.

Annabakescakes Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 5:10am
post #16 of 44

I LOVE this picture of cake slices, it has me in stitches every time I look it. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2012/12/cake-serving-charts-have-nothing-to-do.html

Paperfishies Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 5:13am
post #17 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 

Don't sell yourself short because people are greedy. I wrote this last year, i can't believe it was that long ago, I'm old and time is passing faster. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2013/02/tell-me-about-those-serving-sizes-again.html


Makes sense.  I like the idea of giving a range of servings.  I guess I will use the wilton wedding serving as my guide.

costumeczar Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 11:54am
post #18 of 44

A

I just about had a fit when the bride sent me that, but that's how they cut wedding cake. The proof is right there.

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 2:17pm
post #19 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paperfishies 
 
Makes sense.  I like the idea of giving a range of servings.  I guess I will use the wilton wedding serving as my guide.

 

giving a range of servings adds confusion imo--how do you charge for that?

 

i would recommend charging for one certain amount--then add in enough additional servings incognito for your own security--

 

scrumdiddly--'when the cake pulls away from the sides of the pan--it's done' right? if it pulls away--it's smaller than it was--measure it--baked cakes are smaller than the pan--not so true for cheesecake--but true for most cakes--i mean when you ice it it's back to being the cake pan size--but the cake footprint itself is smaller than the pan-

costumeczar Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 2:53pm
post #20 of 44

The brides I work with tell me that they like being able to choose their cake based on the range of servings. The range is based on the Wilton chart, which tells you that the tier will give you more servings, for the high end, vs the number that I actually took my pans and marked off at a correct 1"x2"x4" for the low end. If you do that you get fewer servings than Wilton says you'll get, so anyone who's using the Wilton chart is charging for more servings per tier, but smaller ones. I went with an average serving count per tier based on that and set a price for each tier without worrying about a price per serving. Here's the full explanation if you want to read the whole thing, I can't write it all out again... http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2009/11/how-i-price-my-wedding-cakes.html

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 3:12pm
post #21 of 44

oh god--i started to read your well written blog and my mind just exploded remembering how i arrived at how & why i do this--it was when you said you did not count the top tier--help me jesus--

 

i remember figuring out servings for a large cake and the bride would change the number back & forth and the top tier size kept changing--so after i reconfigured i had to reconfigure the whole damn thing again when i subtracted the top tier servings because i used to do this too--wilton did so i did but that left the servings short--this back 40 years ago--so back then i fully imploded and there's a crater hole (where there used to be some sense) in my brain--and eventually i started the freebie anniversary cake thing but only to protect whatever sanity i had left--

 

such a simple thing -- so unutterably minutiae laden confusing

 

ugh

 

:) 

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 5:00pm
post #22 of 44

AInteresting, I guess it just shows how different each bakers cakes are. Mine don't pull away from the sides unless they manage to get pretty over baked. (not saying yours are overbaked, just how my recipes/pans work!) Do you grease the sides of your pans? I'm just interested,not trying to interrogate :) I'm a parchment only user, and just on the bottoms.

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 5:14pm
post #23 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes 

Interesting, I guess it just shows how different each bakers cakes are. Mine don't pull away from the sides unless they manage to get pretty over baked. (not saying yours are overbaked, just how my recipes/pans work!)
Do you grease the sides of your pans? I'm just interested,not trying to interrogate icon_smile.gif I'm a parchment only user, and just on the bottoms.

 

no i gotcha---i know--so different sometimes--me too parchment bottom and no grease--i mean they don't look shrunken or anything--it's just a 1/4 inch all around or so--but then it's often about an 8.5 inch cake coming out of a 9" pan--

leylaf Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 5:53pm
post #24 of 44

AI use earlene's cake chart ... earlenescakes.com/ckser.htm...

Annabakescakes Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 9:38pm
post #25 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by leylaf 

I use earlene's cake chart ... earlenescakes.com/ckser.htm...

I used to, until I figured out how much cake I was giving away! I switched charts, no one noticed, everyone still had plenty of cake, and I gave myself a raise.

Annabakescakes Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 9:40pm
post #26 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

I LOVE this picture of cake slices, it has me in stitches every time I look it. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2012/12/cake-serving-charts-have-nothing-to-do.html

I just about had a fit when the bride sent me that, but that's how they cut wedding cake. The proof is right there.

I was served one of @ApplegumPam's finger sized coffee servings at my wedding and we had enough cake left over to eat it for a month. I cut it up, put it in baggies and froze it.

Annabakescakes Posted 8 Jan 2014 , 9:42pm
post #27 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by -K8memphis 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes 

Interesting, I guess it just shows how different each bakers cakes are. Mine don't pull away from the sides unless they manage to get pretty over baked. (not saying yours are overbaked, just how my recipes/pans work!)
Do you grease the sides of your pans? I'm just interested,not trying to interrogate icon_smile.gif I'm a parchment only user, and just on the bottoms.

 

no i gotcha---i know--so different sometimes--me too parchment bottom and no grease--i mean they don't look shrunken or anything--it's just a 1/4 inch all around or so--but then it's often about an 8.5 inch cake coming out of a 9" pan--

I used to grease the sides of my pans, and they would shrink about 1/16 or so, all the way around. 1/4 seems like a lot!

-K8memphis Posted 9 Jan 2014 , 12:08am
post #28 of 44

i often slide the knife around the edge of the cake while it's warm to loosen it-- then when completely cool--to ensure that i can get the cake to flip out i make the cake slide in the pan north south east & west-- by holding the pan at an angle & bopping it on the side--after bopping all the way around--when the cake is slid all the way to one side the amount of empty pan on the other is at least a half inch--baked cakes are usually a liittle bit smaller than the pan they were baked in--

leylaf Posted 9 Jan 2014 , 3:30am
post #29 of 44

A

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

I used to, until I figured out how much cake I was giving away! I switched charts, no one noticed, everyone still had plenty of cake, and I gave myself a raise.

Which chart are you using now? Some times i feel like im giving to much cake.. but wilton's chart seems too little.:(

jason_kraft Posted 9 Jan 2014 , 3:35am
post #30 of 44

A

Original message sent by leylaf

Which chart are you using now? Some times i feel like im giving to much cake.. but wilton's chart seems too little.:(

If the customer thinks the serving size is too small, they are free to order more servings and tell the venue to cut bigger pieces. Wilton is the industry standard, at least in the US.

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