What Do You Think This Is?

Decorating By Number2daughter Updated 18 Nov 2013 , 10:48pm by milkmaid42

Number2daughter Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 1:56pm
post #1 of 20


Need an answer asap from anybody out there.....want to know what you think is used to make the "sparkle". I know about disco dust but does anybody know of any other product that achieves this look? Also, anybody know who should be credited for the original design of this cake? Thanks!!

19 replies
mfeagan Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 2:47pm
post #2 of 20

The only thing I can see there is an over abundance of disco dust. You could use a metallic spray then use some sanding sugar. It won't look the same but similar. You shouldn't use that much disco dust!

Claire138 Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 3:08pm
post #3 of 20

I agree, it looks like disco dust to me & definitely loads of it. As far as I know it's not edible, I'm not sure if there is an edible option for this look but maybe someone on here knows if there is?

Norasmom Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 3:46pm
post #4 of 20

I am wondering if that might be a dummy cake because there is so much glitter on it.  I think airbrush with sanding sugar is your best bet too.

mfeagan Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 3:52pm
post #5 of 20

Can you imagine the cost for all that disco dust if someone really wanted that for a cake?????

AnnieCahill Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 4:02pm
post #6 of 20

Another vote for disco dust.  Gross.

jenbug1 Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 4:39pm
post #7 of 20

A

Original message sent by mfeagan

Can you imagine the cost for all that disco dust if someone really wanted that for a cake?????

This was my first thought too! That's a truckload of dust! $$$ Although pretty, not for eating! Maybe it's just a display/dummy cake?

-K8memphis Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 4:49pm
post #8 of 20

i would not have had the restraint to leave the bow matte--i would have floo flooed it up somehow--i really like the contrast--and applaud the decorator--woulda killed me to leave it--only if i ran out of time would i have left that--but it's stunning

 

i have no idea how she did it but in a really good/great way it reminds me of a popcorn textured ceiling

Number2daughter Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 6:08pm
post #9 of 20

Thanks for confirming what I thought it was. I did not make the customer's order with disco dust because I knew it's not edible (AND you all are correct-a boatload of $$$). Just want to be able to explain to customers in the future why I am unable to make this cake with the exact same look. Having all of you agree with me is a good thing :D. Thanks again!!

Number2daughter Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 6:17pm
post #10 of 20

BTW-this is the cake I actually made for the customer. She wanted the shades of purple/lavender with the toe shoes added.

vonscakes87 Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 6:24pm
post #11 of 20

A

Original message sent by Number2daughter

[URL=http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3142546/] [/URL] BTW-this is the cake I actually made for the customer. She wanted the shades of purple/lavender with the toe shoes added.

So what did you use to make it all glittery and sparkly?looks great!!did you use supports to put the shoes on top?what is disco dust and why is not a good thing?

AnnieCahill Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 7:21pm
post #12 of 20

That is sanding sugar.  It's basically chunky sugar.  You can get it colored or uncolored.  Disco dust is plastic.  It's considered non-toxic but not meant for consumption, i.e. you don't want to put it on food.

mfeagan Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 7:21pm
post #13 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by vonscakes87 


So what did you use to make it all glittery and sparkly?looks great!!did you use supports to put the shoes on top?what is disco dust and why is not a good thing?

 

Obviously I can't answer how the OP made her cake, but this is the quote from the CK Products website on what disco dust is: 

 

Disco Dust

An extra fine glitter with lots of sparkle. 5 grams. Developed for the craft industry and often used on display cakes, Disco Dusts contain only ingredients that are NON-TOXIC. These dusts are not FDA approved. They are not a food product and should not be considered as such.

 

 

Disco dust is often used on cake pops and fondant cakes. You'll see the cake pops referred to as gem pops. There are often arguments on Cake Central about disco dust and why it's okay to use and why it isn't. Bottom line…it is non-toxic so it won't kill you, but you shouldn't put it on things that are supposed to be edible. It should only be used on decorations that will be removed from the cake or cupcakes. 

 

While the original cake this post was about was absolutely STUNNING, I think it's bad practice for someone to use that much of a product on something that shouldn't be eaten. The OP of this thread was asked to make that cake. She had to use other methods to achieve a similar look, but she would never have been able to get the exact look because an inedible product was put on the cake. 

 

There are still those who don't know what Disco Dust is and use it on cakes because it's sold in cake supply stores. I wonder why it was ever introduced to the cake industry. It's quite perplexing. I was one of those dummies who had no clue it was not supposed to be eaten. I bought a container of it a few years ago and tried to use it like luster dust. I got mad that it wouldn't stick and threw it out. I'm glad it didn't stick! It never ended up on the cake! 

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 7:29pm
post #14 of 20

I'm also curious about what you ended up using, "Number2daughter."

 

And "vonscakes87," disco dust is the subject of multiple flame-wars on this board, most of them quite lengthy and/or vicious. My understanding is that it's an inert plastic glitter, technically non-toxic, but that, by itself, definitely doesn't make it "Good Eats" (and so far as we've been able to determine, it's never been approved as a food additive, and let's face it, there are plenty of things that have been so-approved, that later turned out to be rather nasty).

Norasmom Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 7:40pm
post #15 of 20

That purple cake is stunning!!

Number2daughter Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 8:53pm
post #16 of 20

Awww-thanks for the compliment vonscakes87 and Norasmom! And AnnieCahill is correct-I used sugar to make the cake "glitter". Thanks too,mfeagan for posting about disco dust. Educating the public is a never-ending job it would seem.

shanter Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 8:55pm
post #17 of 20

As I remember those were discussions, not flame wars.

LisaBerczel Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 9:00pm
post #18 of 20

Haven't read everything through.... but I'd do this with Edible Glitter (agar agar based).

Photographs beautifully - and layers over a contrasting base for added pizzazz.

 

Not the same color scheme, but this cake used Black Edible Glitter over Black Fondant (glue was black piping gel).

 

Wafer paper flowers are hand made from stock silicone molds. Airbrush color. Colored cocoa butter hand painting. Silver dregees and panned buttons. Black fondant, edible glitter base.

embersmom Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 9:30pm
post #19 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by LisaBerczel 
 

Haven't read everything through.... but I'd do this with Edible Glitter (agar agar based).

Photographs beautifully - and layers over a contrasting base for added pizzazz.

 

Not the same color scheme, but this cake used Black Edible Glitter over Black Fondant (glue was black piping gel).

 

Wafer paper flowers are hand made from stock silicone molds. Airbrush color. Colored cocoa butter hand painting. Silver dregees and panned buttons. Black fondant, edible glitter base.


My first thought upon seeing the OP's photo (the one with which she started this thread) was either edible glitter or sanding sugar.  Disco dust never occurred to me.  Then I thought, "Wow, that IS a ton of edible glitter if that's what it is!"

milkmaid42 Posted 18 Nov 2013 , 10:48pm
post #20 of 20

This is a recipe I found for edible glitter. I know that it is after the fact, but might be useful for future use. I wish I could credit the source, but have it stored on my hard drive with no author indicated.

 

 

 

EDIBLE GLITTER  (Brilliantine)

Put two ounces of gum arabic and 1/2 cup water into a double boiler, and stir occasionally while heating over hot water. When melted, strain through a piece of fine muslin and color as desired. ( Mix light brown and yellow for beautiful gold effect)

Dip a stiff brush into the gum and brush it lightly over pieces of clean, polished glass. Dry in a warm room, or use a SLIGHTLY heated oven

When dry and set, scrape or brush the brilliantine off the glass, and use it as is, or crush with a rolling pin to smaller granules. This brilliantine may be used for spangling cookies or cakes.

 

Jan

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