Help My Cake Looks Like A Cheeseburger!

Decorating By steph owens Updated 16 Oct 2013 , 7:32pm by DeliciousDesserts

cupcakemaker Posted 28 Sep 2013 , 2:09pm
post #31 of 58

AThat sounds like a fab idea.

scwright Posted 28 Sep 2013 , 6:21pm
post #32 of 58

AI think your not allowing the cake to settle before doing your final coat of buttercream, does your cake do that before you put the fondant on? what brand are you using?

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 28 Sep 2013 , 7:38pm
post #33 of 58

I think i read that you iced a frozen cake, every time I have done that, it shifts as it defrosts. A chilled cake is fine, or room temp.

 

I have to agree with AZ though, that cake is definitely not leveled, the rounded top tells you that. From the bulge, it looks like you have too must filling in there, and no dam, so it is squishing out as the cake settles and as you apply fondant.

You cannot use a cake like that for stacking something on top of. Otherwise to properly dowel and stack, it would have to stick up beyond the top of the cake, and leave you with a strange looking gap and most likely an unstable cake, (unless you are using pillars). The top needs to be level!

 

Obviously you don't have time to do this now, but for next time, bake 2 2" high cakes, level the top off, then tort each layer into even 1 inch layers. Before I got an Agbay, I used a level on every single layer, to make sure it was perfect.

You don't need much frosting or filling at all between layers, since you get three layers of it, I use about 1/4". I don't use a dam personally, but I would definitely suggest dong so. Just add powdered sugar til your frosting is a very thick consistency, and pipe a ring around the edge of the cake, then fill with your filling.

Look up 'cake settling' here, and you will find a lot of threads. One method uses a tile on top of the cake to settle it.

After all that, then you can ice it, chill it, don't freeze it, and cover with fondant.

AZCouture Posted 28 Sep 2013 , 8:54pm
post #34 of 58

ADon't forget to show us how it all ended up! Don't leave us hanging..hope it works out ok for the bride.

Cyndibear 08 Posted 29 Sep 2013 , 12:47pm
post #35 of 58

AI always ice a refridgerated cake. Do my crumb coat, then freeze it. I don't use a crusting buttercream do i need some way of shaping it. I do my second coat. Freeze. Take my scraper each time and fix/even out my sides. Fondant is easier to work onto a frozen cake. That will scure your cake from buckling. My freezing time is like 15-20 mins each time for a definite outcome. Hope this helps. Never had any issues.

steph owens Posted 29 Sep 2013 , 4:23pm
post #36 of 58

AOk wow!!! Lots and lots of helpful info!! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!! I will definitely be trying EVERYTHING and do more research. The cake turned out good!! Thank goodness for ribbon :) lol. The bride was very happy

Pearl123 Posted 2 Oct 2013 , 9:15am
post #37 of 58

 :shock:

AZCouture Posted 2 Oct 2013 , 7:21pm
post #38 of 58

Well, just keep practicing, it should get better. Glad they were understanding, and the flowers are cute! 

steph owens Posted 4 Oct 2013 , 4:41am
post #39 of 58

AThank you so much :)

mfeagan Posted 5 Oct 2013 , 9:47pm
post #40 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by steph owens 

Thank you so much icon_smile.gif

 

I know this is after the wedding, but I thought I would just give a small bit of advice. When I first started making cakes, my fondant would do that...not as bad, but I still had bulges. After watching a million different cake professionals on YouTube and reading countless books, I came up with things that work for me. 

 

A GREAT way to make sure your fondant doesn't bulge is to make a rope of fondant to go in between your layers on the outside edge. Then put your filling in it. It creates a dam and makes sure the cake doesn't compress all your filling out. 

 

Also...don't use too much buttercream on the outside of your cake. It's there for flavor and also something for the fondant to stick to. 

 

Hopefully this helps for your next cake. This one turned out really cute! Ribbon and flowers can hide a multitude of mistakes! :)

steph owens Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 2:22pm
post #41 of 58

A[@]mfeagan[/@] that's a good idea to use fondant as a dam, thank you! All ideas from anyone is greatly appreciated!!!

AZCouture Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 4:33pm
post #42 of 58

AA fondant dam? No. No one wants to bite into that. Just work on creating on a dam with icing that works. I don't know anyone else who has to resort to that, and frankly it's icky.

AZCouture Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 4:40pm
post #43 of 58

ANot trying to be argumentative but I use a nice thick layer of icing on all cakes, fondant covered or not, again, what most people I know do as well. I think the OP, and anyone else who feels they need to resort to these kind of shortcuts or what have you, just need to actually practice more. Watch more videos and see how to do it correctly. Can't rush this work. Need to practice, period. Mine weren't smooth and clean the first time, or the second or third times...it took awhile.

mfeagan Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 10:40pm
post #44 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

A fondant dam? No. No one wants to bite into that. Just work on creating on a dam with icing that works. I don't know anyone else who has to resort to that, and frankly it's icky.

If you have a good fondant, it's not icky. And you don't have to make it very thick. I learned this from a well known pastry chef when taking a class with him. I'd rather have a beautiful cake every time and not worry my frosting is going to come out from in between my layers. 

mfeagan Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 10:42pm
post #45 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Not trying to be argumentative but I use a nice thick layer of icing on all cakes, fondant covered or not, again, what most people I know do as well. I think the OP, and anyone else who feels they need to resort to these kind of shortcuts or what have you, just need to actually practice more. Watch more videos and see how to do it correctly. Can't rush this work. Need to practice, period. Mine weren't smooth and clean the first time, or the second or third times...it took awhile.

Also - what method works for you may not work for everyone. They're not shortcuts. They are methods people learn for themselves along the way. 

AZCouture Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 11:16pm
post #46 of 58

ALiterally LOL, I already use the best fondant you can possibly use, it has nothing to do with the taste. Fondant is for covering and decorating a cake, not a rigged up patch because a person can't dam their cakes the right way. And for what it's worth, being a pastry chef, well known or not doesn't impress me when it comes to cake construction or decorating. Sorry, but a fondant rope is nothing more than a lazy method, at best.

So many things that are suggested here are indeed shortcuts and methods for quick fixes because people want instant gratification, rather than slowing down and learning the correct procedures. True story.

AZCouture Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 11:28pm
post #47 of 58

ASorry, the last thing I want to sound like is bashing someone's methods, too late, I'm sure, but that's just completely unnecessary.

mfeagan Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 11:39pm
post #48 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Sorry, the last thing I want to sound like is bashing someone's methods, too late, I'm sure, but that's just completely unnecessary.

But you are bashing - THAT is completely unnecessary. 

morganchampagne Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 11:48pm
post #49 of 58

AYou guys.....

The experts here are here to HELP. They have no reason to bash you. They aren't trying to be rude. They may not tell you what you want to here but it's not bashing.

I think sometimes y'all forget we are all strangers. Of what interest is to somebody else to bash? Who has time to just sit on here and do that...

If you come to the Internet to ask for help don't expect lollipops and rainbows. Just take the help and grow your craft.

morganchampagne Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 11:49pm
post #50 of 58

AJust want to add that the OP did handle it like a champ :)

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 11 Oct 2013 , 12:43am
post #51 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by morganchampagne 

If you come to the Internet to ask for help don't expect lollipops and rainbows. Just take the help and grow your craft.

 :)

Gees Posted 11 Oct 2013 , 1:32am
post #52 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Literally LOL, I already use the best fondant you can possibly use, it has nothing to do with the taste. Fondant is for covering and decorating a cake, not a rigged up patch because a person can't dam their cakes the right way. And for what it's worth, being a pastry chef, well known or not doesn't impress me when it comes to cake construction or decorating. Sorry, but a fondant rope is nothing more than a lazy method, at best.

So many things that are suggested here are indeed shortcuts and methods for quick fixes because people want instant gratification, rather than slowing down and learning the correct procedures. True story.

I totally agree!!

tina0719 Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 4:18pm
post #53 of 58

AWow didn't realize his site had people throwing these little digs at eachother lol

DeliciousDesserts Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 4:25pm
post #54 of 58

AI can see how that may sound like a dig. It really isn't. It's the truth. Sometimes, people will offer "advice" that is a shortcut to learning the right way to do something.

I personally would never use a fondant dam. I also wouldn't recommend it to someone else. I use a buttercream dam. Not only is it more common, it's easier! Just pipe a damn!! More importantly, a fondant dam could cause more problems.

The fondant dam doesn't Amish like a buttercream one. This could lead to trapped air causing a huge air bubble on a finished cake.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 5:26pm
post #55 of 58

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

I can see how that may sound like a dig. It really isn't. It's the truth. Sometimes, people will offer "advice" that is a shortcut to learning the right way to do something.

I personally would never use a fondant dam. I also wouldn't recommend it to someone else. I use a buttercream dam. Not only is it more common, it's easier! Just pipe a damn!! More importantly, a fondant dam could cause more problems.

The fondant dam doesn't Amish like a buttercream one. This could lead to trapped air causing a huge air bubble on a finished cake.


I for one, hate it when my fondant doesn't Amish! Especially wen it's honorific fondant, hehe.

sixinarow Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 5:31pm
post #56 of 58

A

Original message sent by scrumdiddlycakes

I for one, hate it when my fondant doesn't Amish! Especially wen it's honorific fondant, hehe.

Troublemaker! Trying to start a fight between amish and non amish fondant squishwrs.

tina0719 Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 7:10pm
post #57 of 58

ALollllll

DeliciousDesserts Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 7:32pm
post #58 of 58

ACurse that autocorrect!

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