Do You Use Insulation Or An Icing Nail On A 9X13?

Decorating By DebinD Updated 21 Sep 2013 , 6:38pm by DebinD

DebinD Posted 17 Sep 2013 , 5:01pm
post #1 of 14

AI was just wondering..,:it works so well on the round cakes.

13 replies
DebinD Posted 17 Sep 2013 , 8:33pm
post #2 of 14

AAnyone?

IAmPamCakes Posted 17 Sep 2013 , 8:46pm
post #3 of 14

AI don't use anything. Some people swear by nails and strips, but I've never felt the need to hassle with them.

maybenot Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 2:58am
post #4 of 14

By "insulation" do you mean baking strips???

 

I only use baking strips on 14" cakes.  I use Ateco heating cores in ALL cakes .  I get evenly done, pretty flat layers.

 

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DebinD Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:12pm
post #5 of 14

AThanks. I've done the frosting nail with great success as a heating core. But I was thinking I needed 2 for the 9 x 13 I guess. I've also done the soaked towel thing. But I think my towel strips are too short for my 9 x 13z

maybenot Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:44pm
post #6 of 14

I'd put 2 nails in a 9x13 spaced evenly across the long axis. 

 

I never made my own baking strips--I just use the ones from Wilton on my 14" round pans or the very largest oval pan.  Those pans are also the thinner gauge Wilton pans and that's why I use them [or the edges brown too much].  Most of my smaller pans are heavier gauge metal and don't need the baking strips.

whiteangel Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 6:52pm
post #7 of 14

I use 1 nail on 10", 2 nails on 12" and 3 or 4 to 14" and higher. 

 

Never had any luck with the baking strips

cakelover613 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 7:09pm
post #8 of 14

A woman who used to be a cake decorator once told me that turning my temp down by 25 degrees will help keep my cake baking evenly. This is how I always bake now, most cakes I bake at 300-325 depending what the original recipe says. Takes a lot longer to bake, but I haven't had it fail me yet.

cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 7:13pm
post #9 of 14

A

Original message sent by cakelover613

A woman who used to be a cake decorator once told me that turning my temp down by 25 degrees will help keep my cake baking evenly. This is how I always bake now, most cakes I bake at 300-325 depending what the original recipe says. Takes a lot longer to bake, but I haven't had it fail me yet.

Yep, ive read so many people do this and they love this technique.

cakelover613 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 7:21pm
post #10 of 14

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakealicious7 


Yep, ive read so many people do this and they love this technique.

I tried the core method once, and found I hated it. Have also used bake even strips and I don't mind them but they're a hassle to put on the pans. Much easier to pop it in at a lower temp. Slow and steady wins the race :-D

cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 7:24pm
post #11 of 14

ALol well atleast that helps me. I've been thinking about getting the heating core so i could bake in my bigger pans but i think i'll just try it this way :-)

cakelover613 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 7:29pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakealicious7 

Lol well atleast that helps me. I've been thinking about getting the heating core so i could bake in my bigger pans but i think i'll just try it this way icon_smile.gif

Should work out. I have all the way up to 16 inch round and square pans, I bake all this way. Never had any problems!

cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 7:31pm
post #13 of 14

AThanks :-)

DebinD Posted 21 Sep 2013 , 6:38pm
post #14 of 14

AMan I wish I had come back to read this before baking my rounds. Will try on the 9 x 13. Thanks folks.

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