How To Handle Canceled Or Postponed Orders

Business By barbi1959 Updated 12 Jul 2013 , 1:24pm by MimiFix

barbi1959 Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 3:53pm
post #1 of 17

I need some opinions on how to handle orders that get postponed or canceled within 24 hours of when they were suppose to be delivered or picked up?  I don't feel like it's fair to have to refund their money after I already baked and decorated the cake.  And for the record it was them who postponed their event.  Had it been a cancellation on my part I wouldn't have a problem giving a refund, but it was a 4 tiered cake and they did it within 16 hours of when they wanted it and I would like some ideas of how you would handle it and thanks in advance for any help you can give me with this

16 replies
AZCouture Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:05pm
post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbi1959 

I need some opinions on how to handle orders that get postponed or canceled within 24 hours of when they were suppose to be delivered or picked up?  I don't feel like it's fair to have to refund their money after I already baked and decorated the cake.  And for the record it was them who postponed their event.  Had it been a cancellation on my part I wouldn't have a problem giving a refund, but it was a 4 tiered cake and they did it within 16 hours of when they wanted it and I would like some ideas of how you would handle it and thanks in advance for any help you can give me with this

Heck no! You can't resell it, so they can take the dang thing and do what they want with it. And if they need a new one later, ummm, they can pay for a new one. No, it's absolutely not your problem at all, and you are not to come out of pocket for it.

DanaG21 Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:06pm
post #3 of 17

You need a contract that has your policies in it that clearly outlines these types of issues and the consequences.  That way when you get your cancellation/postponement they are very clear you are keeping the money.  Assuming you are getting paid upfront.  Very frustrating....

AZCouture Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:07pm
post #4 of 17

I would at least offer suggestions on freezing or whatever they need to do to keep it fresh for when they do plan to have their party.

kikiandkyle Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:17pm
post #5 of 17

AIt sounds mean but it's not your problem - if you have space to keep it for them then you can decide if you want to offer that to them, but otherwise they can figure out what to do with it themselves. You may offer to take it apart and deliver it boxed separately if it's possible to do so, and charge a small fee to reassemble when they want it.

But it's a custom cake, what do they think you are going to do with it?

MimiFix Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:42pm
post #6 of 17

You definitely need a contract that covers all possibilities (not just this one). As unfortunate as their circumstance might be, you are a business with bills to pay. With all the weddings cake I've done it has happened a few times that the wedding was cancelled or postponed at the last minute. I always showed sincere sympathy for their circumstances while explaining they could save some money by opting to pick it up themselves.

jason_kraft Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:44pm
post #7 of 17

AWhy did they postpone the event?

newbe86 Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 5:35pm
post #8 of 17

Any decent person cannot think that they do not have to pay for the cake. It is custom, you can't resell it. I do not know the circumstances of the cancellation, but it is not reasonable that you should have to take up the cost of the cake because they had to cancel. Does your contract cover this?

barbi1959 Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 5:36pm
post #9 of 17

They lost their power due to a storm, but power was back on within 10 minutes after they canceled and I did tell them how to freeze it.  Also is there a contract on here somewhere that you can change to suit your needs and thank you so much for all the help

Elcee Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 8:50pm
post #10 of 17
Quote:

it was a 4 tiered cake and they did it within 16 hours of when they wanted it

 

 

Quote:
They lost their power due to a storm, but power was back on within 10 minutes

 

 

I'm not sure I understand...they lost their power for 10 minutes 16 hours before their party so they cancelled?

kikiandkyle Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 9:00pm
post #11 of 17

AThey lost their power at an unknown time, but 10 minutes after they called to postpone/cancel the power came back on. At least that's what I understood. It was also 16 hours before the party.

Elcee Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 9:06pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikiandkyle 

They lost their power at an unknown time, but 10 minutes after they called to postpone/cancel the power came back on. At least that's what I understood. It was also 16 hours before the party.

Got it...makes sense to me now...please ignore me icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif

kikiandkyle Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 9:13pm
post #13 of 17

A:-D

cakestomuch Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 9:36pm
post #14 of 17

I don"t think that I would offer to keep it for them. If I did, I would have them sign something that states it has to be taken by a certain date or you could be stuck with it for a long time. I hope it is already paid in full.

cakesbycathy Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 1:30am
post #15 of 17

IF you don't already have a contract that outlines all your policies - payments, liability, cancellations, etc.  - you need one.  Before you sell another cake.

 

At that late date there is no refund.  It's not like you can resell a custom cake.   I would tell them they have to either come get it at the original time or you will be disposing of it as you see fit.  If you have the capabilities to hold on to it for an extra day or two to be accommodating that's great but you are not obligated to store it for them. 
 

cfao Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 12:54pm
post #16 of 17

I had a large wedding years ago (when the fountain and bridge cakes were in style) that cancelled the morning of the wedding day. Her cake was already in my vehicle to be brought to the hall when the mom called and said the groom had just called everything off. She said she wouldn't be needing the cake, so could she swing by to get the refund check. I told her it was ready to go to the hall, the cake was theirs so where would you like it delivered? She was saying not the hall, they certainly wouldn't be going there now. I took the cakes off the separator plates and placed all 9 tiers on regular cake boards and boxed each one. I brought it to the mom's address, where the florist had arrived also with the bouquets and centerpieces. She was yelling at him to just take everything back & sell it in his shop, she just wanted the money back. He left all the flowers with her, I left the cakes. She called later once she had calmed down to apologize for yelling, we were right, she had ordered the products and now she had received delivery of everything. The florist & I felt we had fulfilled our contract, I did not have the room to store a 9 tier cake and he had no need to take apart all those bouquets and centerpieces to try to recoup his $. The hotel did not refund anything or give them all of those 300 meals, neither did any of the other vendors at that point.

MimiFix Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 1:24pm
post #17 of 17

Good business story, cfao. It really drives home the point.

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