Roses With Black Edges

Decorating By Fairytale Updated 14 Jun 2013 , 11:40pm by milkmaid42

Fairytale Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 4:39pm
post #1 of 13

I need to make some roses with black edges.  I thought of using a food grade marker but the line is to thin.  I also thought of just painting the edges with a flat brush.  If you have made these before what technique worked best for you?  Do you have any pictures you can share?

12 replies
tarttokig Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 5:20pm
post #2 of 13

I've made flowers with gold edges and used a flat, small brush and painted very, very carefully. It's easy to slip with the brush so be very careful!

DeliciousDesserts Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 5:23pm
post #3 of 13

AI've painted edges using flat brush. There's a photo in my gallery. It's the square wedding cake with silver peony.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 5:24pm
post #4 of 13

ATip: if you slip, use a bit of water on a fine brush to *erase*

Fairytale Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 5:47pm
post #5 of 13

Thanks so much for your responses.  Will definitely give the flat brush a try.

milkmaid42 Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 6:42pm
post #6 of 13

I like to use a little flat make-up sponge---those little things on a plastic stick. I think they are for eye shadow or something. You can get a package of them at Michael's. When dipped in petal dust and rubbed gently against the edge of the petals (right on the edge, a 90 degree angle), a lovely effect is achieved. Just take care with the pressure, as you know, gumpaste is brittle.

 

Jan

Fairytale Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 6:55pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 

I like to use a little flat make-up sponge---those little things on a plastic stick. I think they are for eye shadow or something. You can get a package of them at Michael's. When dipped in petal dust and rubbed gently against the edge of the petals (right on the edge, a 90 degree angle), a lovely effect is achieved. Just take care with the pressure, as you know, gumpaste is brittle.

 

Jan

Great suggestion.  I would never have thought of that.  I tried the brush and it's working perfectly, but it's taking a lot of time.  I'll also give the sponge a try.

milkmaid42 Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 7:45pm
post #8 of 13

I can't really take credit for that. It is right out of Alan Dunn's book. He is my gum paste flower hero, truly a master at the art of sugar flowers. If you ever want inspiration or advice, his books are an invaluable source.

 

 

Jan

Fairytale Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 8:29pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 

I can't really take credit for that. It is right out of Alan Dunn's book. He is my gum paste flower hero, truly a master at the art of sugar flowers. If you ever want inspiration or advice, his books are an invaluable source.

 

 

Jan

 

I have several of Alan Dunn's book. Which one is it in?   He is an absolute master, as is Robert Haynes.  Guess I'd better get to the store.  Thanks again for the tip.

milkmaid42 Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 11:00pm
post #10 of 13

Fairytale, I have several of his books also. Your question sent me running to my cake room's bookcase to try to locate the book in question. I got so sidetracked, (thanks!) that now I want to quit making the strawberry/rhubarb jam that has been taking up my afternoon. I'd much rather sit down with my gumpaste and make every flower I come across! That being said, after turning many pages of many books, I cannot find the exact tip. I'm beginning to feel it might have been in the narrative of some of his different arrangements. You can see an example, however, on the dust cover of ********** FOWER ARRANGING.  (Gosh, are the mods still deleting any mention of s   u     g   a   r   c   r   a   f   t  ?) I hope not for it is the title of the book, not a web page.

Whatever, it works. I do it often and am pleased with the effect.

 

I hear the lids popping on my jars of hot jam. Maybe if I have any energy left, I just might start on some flowers.

 

Jan

milkmaid42 Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 11:01pm
post #11 of 13

Yup, apparently it is still a banned word.icon_cool.gif

 

Jan

Fairytale Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 11:33pm
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 

Fairytale, I have several of his books also. Your question sent me running to my cake room's bookcase to try to locate the book in question. I got so sidetracked, (thanks!) that now I want to quit making the strawberry/rhubarb jam that has been taking up my afternoon. I'd much rather sit down with my gumpaste and make every flower I come across! That being said, after turning many pages of many books, I cannot find the exact tip. I'm beginning to feel it might have been in the narrative of some of his different arrangements. You can see an example, however, on the dust cover of ********** FOWER ARRANGING.  (Gosh, are the mods still deleting any mention of s   u     g   a   r   c   r   a   f   t  ?) I hope not for it is the title of the book, not a web page.

Whatever, it works. I do it often and am pleased with the effect.

 

I hear the lids popping on my jars of hot jam. Maybe if I have any energy left, I just might start on some flowers.

 

Jan

LOL.  No problem.  I just bought the sponges and  tried them out.  They work perfectly.  They do give the roses a very different look compared to painting the edges.  Your the best!  NOW GET BACK TO YOUR JAM.

milkmaid42 Posted 14 Jun 2013 , 11:40pm
post #13 of 13

LOL ! Glad it worked for you. Wish you could join me in a big wedge of hot Sheepherder's bread spread with that jam! (I bake the bread in a cast iron Dutch oven and it is to die for.) Now that I have you salivating, get back to your roses. Post a pic, OK?

 

Jan

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