Time Consuming Border Coming Up

Decorating By poohthebear Updated 1 Apr 2013 , 1:56am by LeslieBruckman

poohthebear Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 1:26pm
post #1 of 13

I have a very small cake coming up in a couple of months, and the bride has asked for an American Indian bracelet border.  So I am thinking that it will be a the bead pattern and I think it will take some time to make.  I would like to make it ahead of time but not sure what to use?  Fondant? Gumpaste? I do want to make this now and just be able to wrap around the cake when it's time.  Any ideas?

12 replies
ddaigle Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 1:33pm
post #2 of 13

Wow....American Indian bracelets are full of beads.    Depending on which style of bracelet you are making, the only thing you can do ahead of time is make those beads.   I've never made a fondant wrap ahead of time.  It will crack and dry out.  Maybe someone will chime in with a different option.   This will be an amazing border...but I don't see anything but time consuming written all over it. 

Annabakescakes Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 1:55pm
post #3 of 13

Do you use SugarVeil? What about using their burlap style mold, and adding a drop of colored sugarveil between the threads, in the open part? Then, you would have to shrink wrap it, or put it between press and seal, in a ziplock, to keep it fresh, after it sets. It would be perfect for the job! But those molds are SPENDY AS HECK!!! Crazy spendy....

AZCouture Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 3:02pm
post #4 of 13

You could make a temporary mold of a real bracelet with some 50/50 fondant-gumpaste. Now I've never done this, but in theory it sounds plausible. Roll out a long strip of the mix, press your bracelet into it carefully (dust with cornstarch first to prevent sticking), over and over until you have a good repeating pattern, and let it set up for a few days/week on a flat surface. Then if you're careful, you can use that for a mold.

 

Maybe? I'm going to try this sometime with something small. Super cheap alternative to making a real mold, and it can just be tossed afterwards.

Dayti Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 3:52pm
post #6 of 13

How about an edible image?

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 4:36pm
post #7 of 13

If it's a very small cake, I would just pipe it, it is tedious but very simple.

I would use something to make the indents, so each 'bead' is perfectly placed.

Decide on your pattern and print it off enlarged so you have a guide. I would actually number each row, so you can count the beads as you pipe, it makes replicating a pattern so much easier.

 

I haven't done a border exactly like that, but I did a cross stitch cake last year and that's how I did it. It actually goes surprisingly fast!

stefkovic Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 4:56pm
post #8 of 13

Could you make your fondant strip and then pipe the beads on it,(I think I would do royal icing so the beads are hardened so they wont smear when you try to apply it to the cake), let beads dry and then put it in freezer, and when you are ready to use it take it out, let it get to room temp and then apply it to cake. I would think it would still be flexible. Just a thought, you can test it to see if it may work.

-K8memphis Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 5:14pm
post #9 of 13

i've done a similar thing with an exagerated border

 

an idea for you is roll your ribbon a pleasant but on the generous side thickness for handling ease

 

i would use fondant plus cornstarch because i like the crisp that the cs gives when dried plus the forgiveness of the fondant

 

wrap the ribbon around a cake pan the correct size

 

maybe do this in stages so you can use the cake pan as the mold

 

make cuts in the ribbon on the diagonal so you can re-assemble the pieces later

 

make enough cuts to keep it easy to handle and re-assemble at the appointed time

 

dry them out but good--and store them on the cut edge once they are dry (also why you want them a nice thickness)

 

pipe all your lovely beading--take all the time you need

 

now after you assemble the cakes all you have to do it pipe the adjoining beads to cover the joins

 

make some extra of course--probably for snacking on the ride home after delivery ;)

-K8memphis Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 5:35pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

wrap the ribbon around a cake pan the correct size

 

maybe do this in stages so you can use the cake pans as the molds

 

by laying/setting the cake pan on it's side like in a drawer for stability and you can do a couple ribbon portions at a time this way

 

 

make cuts in the ribbon on the diagonal so you can re-assemble the pieces later

 

use a guide to get the correct angle for the diagonal cuts--so they all fit later

 

make enough cuts to keep it easy to handle and re-assemble at the appointed time

 

 

dry them out but good--and store them on the cut edge once they are dry (also why you want them a nice thickness)

 

on the long cut edge so they will stand up for you--but keep them secure & padded well

 

make some extra of course--in case of breakage--probably for snacking on the ride home after delivery ;)

 

 

hope this makes better sense icon_biggrin.gif

carmijok Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 5:44pm
post #11 of 13

First of all, it doesn't  have to be beaded.  Turquoise and silver with elements of coral stones are used often in Indian designs. Even silver bands with black tribal symbols would be pretty.  Google 'American Indian bracelets' in Images and there are many designs that aren't quite so complicated yet have that Native American look.  You might not even have to make it very far in advance either. 

You might want to find out if there is a certain tribe she is wanting to portray and research what symbols tie into that.  I did an Indian Pottery Bowl cake and I used symbols from the Cherokee tribe on it and Cherokee 'roses' spilling out of it.  It actually can be quite simple and lovely.  Even if you did nothing but a silver band with inlaid turquoise fondant 'stones', it would portray an Indian theme.  Also, if you still consider using a bead look, think about using colorful non-pariels (sp?) imbedded in your fondant.  

 

I have kept fondant pieces pliable for quite a long time by just covering them with cling wrap.  HTH!

poohthebear Posted 28 Mar 2013 , 3:31pm
post #12 of 13

Thank you everyone! K8memphis I really like this idea.  You've really made me think your idea will work. Now that I have my camera working with my computer I will take pics when I have it done. Thanks again everyone!

LeslieBruckman Posted 1 Apr 2013 , 1:56am
post #13 of 13

If you go the beaded bracelet look... I would press a beaded bracelet into fondant or mark spaces with a pin. Then apply to cake and use royal icing to place small dots with a small tip.

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