Traditions Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 7:43pm
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8 replies
shanter Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 10:05pm
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Looks like squiggly fine piping to me.

remnant3333 Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 10:36pm
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Looks like they used maybe tip 1 or 2 and piped with butter cream. I am just guessing. Maybe some one here will know for sure. To get the squiggle lines all you do when you pipe is to wiggle piping bag with very short sideways motion while piping.

Traditions Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 10:43pm
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I thought that at first also but when I looked closely they are almost floating around the tier.  Any suggestions? 

-K8memphis Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 10:47pm
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  1. real grapevines
  2. wires
Ducky316 Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 11:21pm
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Looks like to me, because it's floating,  that it's a version of the royal icing "cage method".

 

I don't know for sure though...what do you think?

 

AZCouture Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 11:26pm
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Probably real grapevine, but you could certainly use a fine rope die in your extruder, and form the curly parts separately around a toothpick or something round.

dreamcakestoo Posted 19 Feb 2013 , 12:06am
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This is part of Collette Peters' class that she teaches via Craftsy.com.  I bought the class but haven't watched it yet.  Think it's piped chocolate but I wouldn't swear to it.

Traditions Posted 19 Feb 2013 , 12:07am
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The cage method is what I was thinking but didn't know what it was called.  Just wondering how do I to attach it?

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