nadia99 Posted 15 Dec 2012 , 3:28pm
post #1 of

I'm baking a 3 tiered red velvet cake next week.  Originally I was going to use american buttercream as a filling, now I'm thinking of using the Ermine frosting.  I've used it on red velvet cupcakes before, but not in a cake. A couple questions:

 

1)  Does it hold up without refrigeration, in terms of texture and food safety?  I've read different opinions.. Considering it was used around WWII, I would think it would be fine on the counter for a day?

 

2)  Can this get as smooth as american buttercream to frost the outside?  I want to ice it very smooth - no fondant.

 

Thanks for your help!

 

- Nadia

3 replies
BakingIrene Posted 15 Dec 2012 , 3:57pm
post #2 of

You can get this cooked frosting very smooth.  

 

You can use the same weight of powdered sugar instead of granulated, and strain the cooked mixture through a fine sieve after cooking to guarantee that it is smooth.  It will NOT crust but a metal spatula dipped in a cup of boiling water will get it glass smooth.

 

I personally would keep this cake under construction refrigerated whenever possible--I would let it sit at room temperature ONLY at the actual wedding.  

 

But I'm an old-school fogy with different personal limits of food safety. In the 1950's and before, the more common wedding-cake icings were either dry royal or cooked meringue, which are definitely stable at room temperature. 

nadia99 Posted 17 Dec 2012 , 7:01pm
post #3 of

Thanks for your help! Since I'll be decorating, and the cake will be unrefrigerated for hours, I guess I should use a traditional buttercream then.  Does anyone have any other suggestions on good unrefrigerated frostings to use with red velvet?

Chasey Posted 17 Dec 2012 , 8:35pm
post #4 of

Cream cheese is a very popular pairing with RV.  I would find a good flavoring (some use Lorann's Cheesecake oil) or a stabilized cream cheese recipe to use.  Earlene Moore's website has one, although I've never made it many others have!

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