Julie_S Posted 27 Jun 2012 , 11:46pm

I'm in research mode.

I'm reading up on this and have that people will put some of the following in their batters (not all of them in one batter, of course):

sour cream
greek Yogurt
buttermilk
mayonnaise
miracle Whip
ground almonds
potato starch

What is your fave?

I'm trying to make the most moistest cupcakes anyone's every tasted.
If it means putting in anchovies I'll do it!

Thanks!!!!!!!
icon_smile.gif

29 replies
Pearl645 Posted 28 Jun 2012 , 12:19am

sour cream
oil
buttermilk

I'm curious to know how mayonnaise and miracle whip work in cakes and what success people have had with it. Cake Love uses potato starch in their yellow cake. Heard it makes a light and soft cake.

BakingIrene Posted 28 Jun 2012 , 1:26am

Have tried and it works:

mayonnaise (esp in chocolate)

leftover pastry cream folded in at the very end

cake flour instead of all-purpose

jenng1482 Posted 28 Jun 2012 , 1:36am

Coffee instead of water in chocolate cake!

cakespender Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 7:27am

I second the coffee in chocolate, I have also heard of using apple sauce but haven't tried it.

munching_on_cookies Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 6:56pm

sour cream definitely helps make those chocolate cupcakes moist!

kalykreations Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 7:06pm

Hi Girls & Boys
Could someone please share a cup cake recipe that uses oil instead of butter?
Cheers

megan_in_pink Posted 7 Jul 2012 , 5:29pm

A quick question, can I put miracle whip in my carrot cake recipe? I really do not want to go out to get some sour cream.

jeartist Posted 7 Jul 2012 , 5:56pm

I've made very moist choc cuppies with the Chocolate WASC recipe on CC. Just watch not to overbake and take out while there are still crumbs on the toothpick tester.
As for mayo in chocolate cake, when I was a child, long long long ago, that was a very popular cake. I always thought I could taste the mayo in it and didn't like it but that may have just been my imagination.

missunique1989 Posted 7 Jul 2012 , 11:38pm

half milk half whipping cream sour cream[/b]

sixbittersweets Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 2:53am

I agree on at least some oil as opposed to all butter, mayo for my RV, and though it's not an ingredient, not overbaking (it sounds obvious but it makes a HUGE difference).

FromScratchSF Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 4:57am

Don't overbake. icon_biggrin.gif Best ingredient in your pantry.

fcakes Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 11:56am

I've heard that adding glycerin makes the cakes/cupcakes really moist... anyone tried that??

Pearl645 Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 3:32pm

Ahh yes. Good old non over-baking. My cakes come out so moist when I bake them one layer at a time and once that cake tester is clean, out those cake pans go. Even a sponge cake can bake nice and moist once not over-baked. I read Lindy's Cakes Madeira cake recipe calls for a small amount of glycerin per egg for the same effect. Haven't tried it though. I also found a lot of my scratch recipes are more moist when baked one recipe at a time. Once I start doubling and tripling...say hello to a heavy cake that isn't so moist anymore.

FromScratchSF Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 4:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

I've heard that adding glycerin makes the cakes/cupcakes really moist... anyone tried that??




Well, I think you can add whatever to a box mix and it'll still make a cake, but I'd never add glycerin to a scratch cake!

Seriously, ya'all, I don't mean to sound crappy or whatever, but if you are trying to figure out what to add to your cake to make it "moist", "super moist", "moistest", or "more moist" then you are not baking properly. Meaning, you are over-mixing, over-measuring, and/or over-baking. Or your recipe sucks. You also don't want "the moistest cupcakes anyone has ever had" because they will crumble, fall apart and not pull from your papers, which happens when you add too much fat, sugar, eggs, whatever.

"Moist" is for armpits. If you have a good recipe, weigh your ingredients, follow the recipe directions and don't bake it until it's a brick, your cake should be good.

Also, cakes need time to mature. I know, everyone thinks they want cake straight from the oven but I guarantee you - put a hot cake straight in the freezer overnight. Not only will the flavor completely change, deepen and develop from a cake that seems dry and flavorless straight from the oven, it will also lock in any condensation that naturally escapes when a hot thing meets cool air. making it, er, more moist icon_biggrin.gif.

FromScratchSF Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 4:52pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie_S

I'm in research mode.

I'm reading up on this and have that people will put some of the following in their batters (not all of them in one batter, of course):

sour cream
greek Yogurt
buttermilk
These three things are interchangeable. They all contain cultures which help for emulsion but also help for flavor. But each has different cultures so they taste different in the final product and all have different acid levels (buttermilk has the least, sour cream has the most). The more lactic acid, the more you have to adjust your baking powder/soda.
mayonnaise adds an additional fat component and different flavor. Can leave a greasy feel in the mouth.
miracle Whip Same as above
ground almonds I don't see how this would be beneficial at all.
potato starch This doesn't make anything moist. It can help expand your crumb but adding it is SUPER tricky unless you have a recipe that already calls for it.

What is your fave?

I'm trying to make the most moistest cupcakes anyone's every tasted.
If it means putting in anchovies I'll do it!

Thanks!!!!!!!
icon_smile.gif




Sorry, just trying to help again icon_biggrin.gif

Pearl645 Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 8:12pm

That was really good advice. Thank you. U didn't sound crappy. I know the reason why my scratch recipes get heavy when doubled and tripled is due to over-mixing. Somehow, I just can't get it right and I use the spatula method of folding in flour and liquid one at a time so I make one recipe batch at a time. I know..horrible right..esp time wise for a business. I have noticed a cake from the oven cling wrapped and put in the freezer helps a lot. Only did it this year when I saw other CC members said it kept their kept moist. Thanks for the advice. It was great icon_smile.gif

travmand Posted 11 Jul 2012 , 10:43am

My vote is for not over-mixing (especially chocolate) and oven-to-freezer for cake.

chocolatefudgecakefan Posted 11 Jul 2012 , 11:37am

I have used glycerin before and also having a bowl of water lower in the oven helps to keep my cakes moist.

fcakes Posted 15 Aug 2012 , 4:17pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

I've heard that adding glycerin makes the cakes/cupcakes really moist... anyone tried that??



Well, I think you can add whatever to a box mix and it'll still make a cake, but I'd never add glycerin to a scratch cake!

Seriously, ya'all, I don't mean to sound crappy or whatever, but if you are trying to figure out what to add to your cake to make it "moist", "super moist", "moistest", or "more moist" then you are not baking properly. Meaning, you are over-mixing, over-measuring, and/or over-baking. Or your recipe sucks. You also don't want "the moistest cupcakes anyone has ever had" because they will crumble, fall apart and not pull from your papers, which happens when you add too much fat, sugar, eggs, whatever.

"Moist" is for armpits. If you have a good recipe, weigh your ingredients, follow the recipe directions and don't bake it until it's a brick, your cake should be good.

Also, cakes need time to mature. I know, everyone thinks they want cake straight from the oven but I guarantee you - put a hot cake straight in the freezer overnight. Not only will the flavor completely change, deepen and develop from a cake that seems dry and flavorless straight from the oven, it will also lock in any condensation that naturally escapes when a hot thing meets cool air. making it, er, more moist icon_biggrin.gif.




Thnx FromScratchSF! I also make everything from scratch and detest mixes icon_smile.gif I'm pretty happy with the way my cakes and cupcakes turn out moist and yummy.... But wanted to try the oven to freezer trick.

So do I just take the hot cake out of the pan, wrap it in cling film and put it overnight in the freezer? Thaw it at room temp the next day? How much time will it take to thaw for say, a 9" round?

And how would you suggest putting cupcakes from the oven to the freezer? Wrapped individually?

Thanks!

FromScratchSF Posted 15 Aug 2012 , 10:02pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

I've heard that adding glycerin makes the cakes/cupcakes really moist... anyone tried that??



Well, I think you can add whatever to a box mix and it'll still make a cake, but I'd never add glycerin to a scratch cake!

Seriously, ya'all, I don't mean to sound crappy or whatever, but if you are trying to figure out what to add to your cake to make it "moist", "super moist", "moistest", or "more moist" then you are not baking properly. Meaning, you are over-mixing, over-measuring, and/or over-baking. Or your recipe sucks. You also don't want "the moistest cupcakes anyone has ever had" because they will crumble, fall apart and not pull from your papers, which happens when you add too much fat, sugar, eggs, whatever.

"Moist" is for armpits. If you have a good recipe, weigh your ingredients, follow the recipe directions and don't bake it until it's a brick, your cake should be good.

Also, cakes need time to mature. I know, everyone thinks they want cake straight from the oven but I guarantee you - put a hot cake straight in the freezer overnight. Not only will the flavor completely change, deepen and develop from a cake that seems dry and flavorless straight from the oven, it will also lock in any condensation that naturally escapes when a hot thing meets cool air. making it, er, more moist icon_biggrin.gif.



Thnx FromScratchSF! I also make everything from scratch and detest mixes icon_smile.gif I'm pretty happy with the way my cakes and cupcakes turn out moist and yummy.... But wanted to try the oven to freezer trick.

So do I just take the hot cake out of the pan, wrap it in cling film and put it overnight in the freezer? Thaw it at room temp the next day? How much time will it take to thaw for say, a 9" round?

And how would you suggest putting cupcakes from the oven to the freezer? Wrapped individually?

Thanks!




Yup - I pop mine in the fridge straight form the oven for about 10 minutes, turn them out onto plastic, wrap them then in the freezer they go. Cake defrosts extremely fast. It's hard to say because I don't know your climate, but in SF (temps hover 60-70 degrees F year round), it takes about 30 minutes in the plastic for a 9" to be defrosted enough to tort and fill.

I turn cupcakes out on a sheet pan then put them direct in the freezer. I lay a piece of parchment on top of them then take another sheet pan, turn it up-side down and use it as a lid. I then can throw another sheet pan of cupcakes on it and keep stacking them.

fcakes Posted 16 Aug 2012 , 5:23pm

Wow! Thnxx!

Sugarsweetcafe Posted 18 Aug 2012 , 5:58pm

Thanks for the tips ScratchSF icon_smile.gif

Julie_S Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 12:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcakes

I've heard that adding glycerin makes the cakes/cupcakes really moist... anyone tried that??



Seriously, ya'all, I don't mean to sound crappy or whatever, but if you are trying to figure out what to add to your cake to make it "moist", "super moist", "moistest", or "more moist" then you are not baking properly. Meaning, you are over-mixing, over-measuring, and/or over-baking. Or your recipe sucks. You also don't want "the moistest cupcakes anyone has ever had" because they will crumble, fall apart and not pull from your papers, which happens when you add too much fat, sugar, eggs, whatever.

"Moist" is for armpits. If you have a good recipe, weigh your ingredients, follow the recipe directions and don't bake it until it's a brick, your cake should be good.

Also, cakes need time to mature. I know, everyone thinks they want cake straight from the oven but I guarantee you - put a hot cake straight in the freezer overnight. Not only will the flavor completely change, deepen and develop from a cake that seems dry and flavorless straight from the oven, it will also lock in any condensation that naturally escapes when a hot thing meets cool air. making it, er, more moist icon_biggrin.gif.




Dear FromScratch:
Well, I tried the method of putting the cake directly from oven into the freezer, and I must say I like this method. Will do it from now on. Fabulous!
Thanks for the words of wisdom on not overbaking too!
Julie icon_wink.gif

steveproxy Posted 18 Oct 2012 , 12:43pm

Coffee instead of water in chocolate cake!

shannycakers Posted 18 Oct 2012 , 12:57pm

From Stratch SF: thank you for the cupcake idea! I have a question please, how long can you leave them in the freezer for inside the trays- cupcakes- I mean? What is your threathold for freezer freshness when your talking about cupcakes? I have not successfully froze a cupcake. Thanks!

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