Help Please! "creamy" Vs "old Fashioned"

Decorating By Bridgette1129 Updated 24 Feb 2012 , 1:25am by Bridgette1129

Bridgette1129 Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 7:49pm
post #1 of 10

Hi!
So I have a potential customer who is interested in sheet cakes and she said their old bakery had and they preferred "old fashioned frosting rather than the creamy. Do you use only creamy or do you have the sweeter frosting?"

Their menu has 3 sections for frosting:

1) Frosting Flavors: Vanilla or Chocolate Creamy (A high quality, non-dairy whipped cream style icing. Refrigeration Suggested)

2) Vanilla or Chocolate Fluffy (A Sweet, old fashioned frosting)

3) Additional Charge for these: Buttercream, Cream cheese, real whipped cream

I'm assuming #1 is Bettercreme or something? That Rich's stuff? #2 sounds like what she's referring to what she likes but I originally thought buttercream when she said sweeter frosting?

Any help is appreciated!

9 replies
Cakery2012 Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 8:13pm
post #2 of 10

Old fashioned frosting to me is the cooked kind .But if that list is from the other bakery it says old fashioned on#2. Please post when you find out what kind that is . Im interested in what else is called old fashioned .
Sorry I'm no.help.

AnnieCahill Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 8:14pm
post #3 of 10

Why non-fairy? I thought fairies are what gave icing its creaminess? They mix my icing better than my Kitchen Aid.

Bridgette1129 Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 8:26pm
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

Why non-fairy? I thought fairies are what gave icing its creaminess? They mix my icing better than my Kitchen Aid.




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AnnieCahill Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 8:42pm
post #5 of 10

I would assume the creamy to be Bettercreme (which is non-dairy and does not require refrigeration). The old-fashioned is probably butter and powdered sugar.

Annie

Bridgette1129 Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 8:52pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

I would assume the creamy to be Bettercreme (which is non-dairy and does not require refrigeration). The old-fashioned is probably butter and powdered sugar.

Annie




Thanks.

TexasSugar Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 8:54pm
post #7 of 10

Why not call them and ask them? You don't have to ask for the recipe, just ask them what the difference is.

Bridgette1129 Posted 23 Feb 2012 , 9:48pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Why not call them and ask them? You don't have to ask for the recipe, just ask them what the difference is.




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AmysCakesNCandies Posted 24 Feb 2012 , 1:13am
post #9 of 10

I would put my money on Bettercream as creamy. When I used to work with some un-named cake suppliers we used to explain bettercream (flavorwise) as somewhere between whipped cram & buttercream- it is less sweet tasting than classic american buttercream

Bridgette1129 Posted 24 Feb 2012 , 1:25am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmysCakesNCandies

I would put my money on Bettercream as creamy. When I used to work with some un-named cake suppliers we used to explain bettercream (flavorwise) as somewhere between whipped cram & buttercream- it is less sweet tasting than classic american buttercream




I think that too. I'm just wondering what the old-fashioned style is? Because they have buttercream separate... hmmm. I think i will go with buttercream and hope they like it. It is sweet and she said they like sweeter.

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