handymama Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 2:02am
post #1 of

I've had my own shop for a few years, but have done cakes exclusively. Now my daughter wants to try her hand at cupcakes. I'm thinking of getting a couple of the ice cream-style scoops, but don't know which size is correct to make cupcakes (from a mix) that come almost to the to of the paper. Suggestions? TIA

12 replies
leah_s Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 2:29am
post #2 of

Every restaurant supply store sells the standard portion scoops. For standard size cupcakes I use the red handled scoop. The colors are consistent

handymama Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 4:36am
post #3 of

Leah, do you happen to know how many ounces that is? We have a kitchen supply store that carries scoops in various sizes, but they're all-metal.

mfoxx9 Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 4:45am
post #4 of

My metal scoop is a size 20. I don't know how many ounces that is.

imagenthatnj Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 5:49am
post #5 of

http://www.chefs-resources.com/Scoop-DisherSizes

http://www.globeequipment.com/Kitchen-Supplies/Kitchen-Tools/Disher-Scoops

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Articles/Cooking-Tips--Techniques-642/portion-scoop-equivalents.aspx

scp1127 Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 6:14am
post #6 of

Mycratch recipes are all different. Some need to be filled to within 1/2 inch, some 1/4 inch, and some 2/3 full. For each recipe, I note the amount to fill and then I note the size disher (scoop) used to fill it. On more liquid batters, I use dispensers, but I still have a note as to how high to fill.

handymama Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 1:09pm
post #7 of

Yes, I've noticed the same is true for mixes--different flavors rise differently. There are some cakes that I only do from scratch--and I'd prefer to be totally scratch--just haven't wanted to spend the time and money to get beyond the "scratch cakes are dry" syndrome.

KoryAK Posted 26 Nov 2011 , 11:24pm
post #8 of

I like the yellow on, slightly heaped, for mine. It's a size 20. The metal ones should still have a size on them.

Bridgette1129 Posted 27 Nov 2011 , 12:59am
post #9 of

I use a 1/4 cup measure for most of mine. Some I use my 3 tbsp scooper. So I will be buying a Blue #16 and a #20 yellow probably.

handymama Posted 27 Nov 2011 , 2:55am

Thanks everyone--this has been really helpful.

JaniceBest Posted 27 Nov 2011 , 3:31am

I use the red scoop for flat topped cupcakes, yellow for round topped muffins.

tm-treats Posted 27 Nov 2011 , 5:14pm

Hello!

I live in the Uk. I've done a trial day at a cupcake shop and they measure their cupcake batter. As one of you mentioned, cupcake batter tend to have different consistencies. If you a thick batter ,it tends to stick in scoop. If you really want to be accurate...measure it. It's extra work but great for consistency.

I use do 70-75 g if i want a big dome and 60-65 g if i just wan an average one. You can even go less if you use liquid fondant. Have a play until you get the right amount for you. I used to do the scoop method becuase it is fast but I switched to this one because my domes stays the same no matter what type of batter you use.

I still use scoops to scoop the batter into caseband measure. It's faster and the amoutn is pretty much within 10-20 grams range.

HTH!

tm-treats Posted 27 Nov 2011 , 8:44pm

Hello!

I live in the Uk. I've done a trial day at a cupcake shop and they measure their cupcake batter. As one of you mentioned, cupcake batter tend to have different consistencies. If you a thick batter ,it tends to stick in scoop. If you really want to be accurate...measure it. It's extra work but great for consistency.

I use do 70-75 g if i want a big dome and 60-65 g if i just wan an average one. You can even go less if you use liquid fondant. Have a play until you get the right amount for you. I used to do the scoop method becuase it is fast but I switched to this one because my domes stays the same no matter what type of batter you use.

I still use scoops to scoop the batter into caseband measure. It's faster and the amoutn is pretty much within 10-20 grams range.

HTH!

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