Modeling Chocolate

Decorating By ngandara Updated 3 Sep 2011 , 5:08am by fondantgrl

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ngandara Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 10:00pm
post #1 of 14

Does anyone use modeling chocolate? If so, is there a good recipe to use? I have read a lot of reviews that when people make it the chocolate get's gritty.

13 replies
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metria Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 10:17pm
post #2 of 14

i usually buy the 1 lb white almond bark (aka candy coating) at the grocery store. melt that down in the microwave, then add 1/3 cup of light corn syrup. it looks awful when you make it, and a little better when cooled on the counter over night. once you knead it, only then does it look useful!

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Sweetwise Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 11:19pm
post #3 of 14

I seem to have more success if I do this: right after I mix the clear corn syrup (1/2 cup) and melted chocolate (1 lb), I pour it out and let it rest about 20 minutes. When it gets firm enough to knead but is still slightly warm, I knead it. Fat falls out, almost like I'm squeezing a wet cloth. It gets nice and smooth, and I don't save what was squeezed out. I then wrap it and put it in a baggie. Seems pretty consistent!

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fondantgrl Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 11:42pm
post #4 of 14

So far I've had only one failure, only because I was rushing.. But modeling chocolate is really very easy to make.. One bag of Wiltons Candy melts and 1/3 cup light corn syrup.. I posted these in another thread about chocolate clay/Modeling chocolate: these are wrapped and decorated w/ modeling chocolate:

I love modeling chocolate.. it handles very nicely.

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PattyT Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 12:11am
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetwise

I seem to have more success if I do this: right after I mix the clear corn syrup (1/2 cup) and melted chocolate (1 lb), I pour it out and let it rest about 20 minutes. When it gets firm enough to knead but is still slightly warm, I knead it. Fat falls out, almost like I'm squeezing a wet cloth. It gets nice and smooth, and I don't save what was squeezed out. I then wrap it and put it in a baggie. Seems pretty consistent!




I've seen this technique a couple of times here and on the internet. They called it "milking". Most the oil/fat comes out and it's just the chocoloate solids are left to model with. Have tried both ways (milking/not-milking) and have had pretty much equal results on both.

Would love to hear more opinions from CC'ers.

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ngandara Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 12:25am
post #6 of 14

Thank you so much for all the helpful tips!!!!! fondantgrl I can't seem to open the pics you posted : (

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fondantgrl Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 3:10am
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ngandara

Thank you so much for all the helpful tips!!!!! fondantgrl I can't seem to open the pics you posted : (




it is posted from photobucket.. it should show.. nothing to open..

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ngandara Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 3:19am
post #8 of 14

I guess I just can't view them from my work computer...Sorry! Those cakes are AMAZING!!!!! Thanks for posting the pics!!!!!!! : )

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pianocat Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 3:30am
post #9 of 14

How does modeling chocolate keep? Can you make things ahead of time and keep them? And finally, how do you keep them-refrigerator, covered container? TIA

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fondantgrl Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 4:51am
post #10 of 14

I always make mine a day ahead. No need to refrigerate. When I am ready to use it, I cut it in smaller pieces and stick it in the microwave for like 10 seconds just to soften it and soft enough to knead.. usaribbon.gif

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ngandara Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 5:31pm
post #11 of 14

1 more question...do you use butter cream first? How do u get the chocolate to stick?

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fondantgrl Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 5:36pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ngandara

1 more question...do you use butter cream first? How do u get the chocolate to stick?




Just like fondant, to make it stick, a layer of icing such as butter cream must be under it.

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ajwonka Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 5:55pm
post #13 of 14

Those cakes are incredible! When I rolled it out to cover a 3D decoration, it wanted to crack when I bent it but yours doesn't seem to do that?!

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fondantgrl Posted 3 Sep 2011 , 5:08am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajwonka

Those cakes are incredible! When I rolled it out to cover a 3D decoration, it wanted to crack when I bent it but yours doesn't seem to do that?!




sometimes it also depends on the weather... if it is a little warm, they come out a little softer therefore they stretch nicely and won't crack. OR it might be a little to stiff. Maybe try adding about 1/2 tsp. more of corn syrup.. It is the corn syrup that makes it pliable.. good luck.. icon_smile.gif

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