Smoothing Bc- The Spray Water Method

Decorating By theCword Updated 13 Aug 2011 , 11:12pm by ddaigle

theCword Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 2:30pm
post #1 of 18

I haven't seen this around yet but I had my 1st Wilton class several nights ago. Our instructor quickly smoothed a bc cake using a spray bottle. She generously sprayed water all over the cake and then used her spatula to smooth. She said the water evaporates and if you mess up, just spray again and start over. It turned out pretty well for being in a warm room (where bc didn't crust all the way) and for doing it in a short amount of time.

17 replies
poohsmomma Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 2:49pm
post #2 of 18

Never heard of that before...interesting.

Elcee Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 4:07am
post #3 of 18

I friend of mine who learned to decorate back in the 70s does that, too. I've yet to try it but may give it a whirl on my next cake.

AnnieCahill Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 2:22pm
post #4 of 18

I've heard that a lot of people do this. I do this too. If I dip my spatula in hot water to smooth, I don't wipe the water off. The water helps lubricate the surface of the icing so you get less resistance and fewer spatula marks.

I only do this with American buttercream, because when I use a hot spatula with IMBC it makes the buttercream brown and spotty in areas for some reason.

theCword Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 2:37pm
post #5 of 18

I wonder if it's an old trick...

I'm going to try it in class next Monday and see how it comes out. Her spatula wasn't hot or anything either...

Funny story, when I heard her say "I'm going to show you a trick. You won't see this in tv. How to smooth your cake with a spray bottle".

So I'm imagining her using the actual bottle and rolling it on the cake (sorta like the roller method).

She then proceeds to take out a spray bottle that was hanging out in her little cake tool box. It looked used and dirty. I know my eyes went: icon_eek.gif . But atlas, she used it to SPRAY the cake not roll it. icon_rolleyes.gif

LadyTangerine Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:00pm
post #6 of 18

That sounds like a great idea. Thanks for sharing! I usually just use a hot spatula (dried of course) but I'm going to give it a spin next time. Does it give the buttercream a shiny effect though? I tend to like mine to look fairly matte.

pinklatte Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:12pm
post #7 of 18

Thank you for sharing. I'm going to try this next time.

indydebi Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:18pm
post #8 of 18

Yeah this is definitely a "what once was old is new again" thing that I also learned back in the 70s. works even better with warm water .... a deviation of the spatula in hot water method. The warm water 'softens' the fat in the icing, like a hot spatula 'melts' the fat in the icing, making it easy to smooth.

theCword Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:19pm
post #9 of 18

Yes it did, it looked shiney but once it dried it just looked like crusted bc and there were no water spots.

And like I said, she sprayed it generously! I would had thought all that misting would had made the bc start running but I guess that's why she let it sit for a bit beforehand. Still, she mentioned how warm the room was (it was hot), so it didn't crust like she wanted it to.

indydebi Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:21pm
post #10 of 18

careful using any type of warm/hot water method on colored icing. If the water runs, it can cause runs in the color.

labmom Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 12:11am
post #11 of 18

I have been using the spray bottle method for about 30 yrs. It doesn't matter if it is cold or warm it just works. you can wipe up the extra run of the water around the base of the cake but the cake will look like glass... smooth and wonderful

I have a travel bag for repairs with a little spray bottle like for make up and then I have the big industrial plant or kitchen size sprayer for home.

It just depends on the cake if I use the spray bottle method or the VIVA smooth method. I love the smooth method so easy for repairs.. but it is good have options.

Yes try it.. it works great.

BurnsyJ Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 12:25am
post #12 of 18

Will it help with those pesky air bubbles?

jvega21 Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 1:06am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Yeah this is definitely a "what once was old is new again" thing that I also learned back in the 70s. works even better with warm water .... a deviation of the spatula in hot water method. The warm water 'softens' the fat in the icing, like a hot spatula 'melts' the fat in the icing, making it easy to smooth.





Going to culinary school and this is how i was taught. But the spray bottle sounds even better! will try on the next cake : )

LKing12 Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 1:22am
post #14 of 18

I read about someone using this method and have already bought a spray bottle and will have it to use on the next cake.

ddaigle Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 1:52am
post #15 of 18

That is my method. I use super hot water with my spatula. Doesn't matter to me if the water in the water bottle is hot or not. I spin my cake on the turn table and spray, spray, spray.

VaBelle Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 2:27am
post #16 of 18

Hmmm...I have three cakes to do next week (that's a lot for me) so I'll have to give it a try.

Marina Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 3:27am
post #17 of 18

Like Deb said, don't use it on colored icing because it will leave color marks. That's happened to me...

ddaigle Posted 13 Aug 2011 , 11:12pm
post #18 of 18

I use the technique on colored icing all the time. I ice it a little lighter then after it dries and all the marks show up, I air brush and it is perfect.

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