How Do You Approach Restaurants?

Business By Rhonlynn Updated 29 Jun 2011 , 6:33pm by Rhonlynn

Rhonlynn Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 5:01pm
post #1 of 8

I think I may be a gluten for punishment here, but how do you approach restaurants with small cakes, or cupcakes? I thought about that after getting my second certificate last night for my Wilton's class of fondant and gumpaste.

7 replies
jason_kraft Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 5:32pm
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhonlynn

I think I may be a gluten for punishment here



Pun intended? icon_wink.gif

Quote:
Quote:

but how do you approach restaurants with small cakes, or cupcakes?



Are you asking about selling your products wholesale to restaurants?

MimiFix Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 5:39pm
post #3 of 8

Congratulations on your accomplishments! Now you want to own a business and sell cakes? Excellent!!

Many restaurants would love to purchase homemade desserts. But they are only allowed to buy from licensed facilities. If your state has a cottage law, contact the state/county/municipal agency for requirements. Otherwise, find a commercial kitchen for your production and get a license.

In the meantime, do your market research and find restaurants/eateries that you want to approach. Once you have a license, make samples and put together a price list, then visit the places you have targeted. Good luck!

Rhonlynn Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 5:39pm
post #4 of 8

Yeah, pun intended. This lady sells vegan cupckes at a pizza place, for instance. where do you start? Or like, selling cupcakes at farmer's markets? Or small 5 x 3 cakes, decorated.

jason_kraft Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 5:47pm
post #5 of 8

You'll want to put together a business plan first, which includes your product assortment and cost structures so you can work out pricing at retail and wholesale levels (which may or may not be the same). As Mimi said you'll also need to make sure you are operating legally and have liability insurance coverage.

There are several types of wholesale opportunities out there, including restaurants, coffee shops, grocery stores, specialty stores, caterers, venues, etc. Your sales approach will vary depending on the wholesale customer, what you offer, and what they are looking for. Selling at a farmer's market is considered retail and has its own challenges -- around here it's difficult for non-farmers to get a table, and the amount of profit you can make (once you pay the table fees and take into account the time to make the product and staff the table) is not that great.

Selling vegan cupcakes at a pizza place sounds a little strange since pizza is typically not vegan, unless the restaurant specializes in vegan pizza.

Rhonlynn Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 6:02pm
post #6 of 8

The pizza is totally vegan. Cashew cheese.

jason_kraft Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 6:07pm
post #7 of 8

Interesting, never heard of cashew cheese before. A few pizza places around here have vegan options with daiya cheese.

Rhonlynn Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 6:33pm
post #8 of 8

Missouri has a cottage law.

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