Which Cake Sizes Go Well Together?

Decorating By Karsn Updated 19 Jun 2011 , 11:19pm by Karsn

Karsn Posted 19 Jun 2011 , 1:54pm
post #1 of 6

Sorry about my bad english (me danish icon_biggrin.gif )

I will be making a baptism cake to serve 40 people. A round two tier cake.
I have only made a two tier cake once before. Please help me a little, what sizes looks good together? Can you write in cm?

How much can i charge for this cake? I have tried to use a price calculating method on Cakeboss.com. But the final price just ends up really high i think.

The cake will be in a white and baby blue theme. The bottom cake will have white and blue stripes. The top cake will be blue with simple white/blue flowers on the side. Baby footprints around on the cake so it looks like a little baby boy wander around. On the way he dropped all sorts of things, like a toycar, feeding bottle etc. And we find him on the top of the cake sleeping under a blanket. Thats the generel idea.

5 replies
leah_s Posted 19 Jun 2011 , 10:14pm
post #2 of 6

6/9 looks nice but feeds more than 40. A 9" round serves 32 and a 6" round serves 12. I don't know what cakeboss software calculated, but I'd be around $200 with delivery, and assuming fondant covered.

ElegantOccasions Posted 19 Jun 2011 , 10:57pm
post #3 of 6

@OP: You design sounds lovely.

@Leah: Making a wedding cake for 150. Thinking, 14, 12, 10 & 6 (for anniverysary). Is that enough. BTW, I'll be cutting the cake. Thank you in advance.

msulli10 Posted 19 Jun 2011 , 11:16pm
post #4 of 6

I like 10in and 6in. Wilton cutting guide says a 10in will feed 28 servings and 6 in will feed 12 servings, but truthfully you will get a more than 40 servings.

deetmar Posted 19 Jun 2011 , 11:17pm
post #5 of 6

I try to put 3" in between my pan sizes, such and 6" and 9" unless I want the flowers or decorations to be close together then a do 2".

As far as pricing, I have found that it is best to be competitive in your area. I have gone around to the local grocery stores and asked for their price lists, and researched other bakers in the area to see their prices. You don't want to charge so much that people won't purchase from you, but you also don't want to give your product away. What works in New York, will not work in Iowa. You will always have someone say you are charging too much, but remember that you are doing a custom cake, not something that is stored in the freezer of the local super market.

When I first started out my prices were alot lower, but once I built my business, I was able to charge more. With the increase of the price of ingredients, you have to make sure you account for that.

Karsn Posted 19 Jun 2011 , 11:19pm
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

6/9 looks nice but feeds more than 40. A 9" round serves 32 and a 6" round serves 12. I don't know what software calculated, but I'd be around $200 with delivery, and assuming fondant covered.




So in cm thats:
9" = 23cm in diameter
6" = 15cm in diameter

It doesn't sound like much cake to me. The Wilton cake chart must use very thin slices of cake per person. Will it be enough if i have 3 layers of cake and 2 layers of filling in each cake?

Will try and sell the cake for 200.

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