Ganache Is Torture

Decorating By kristiemarie Updated 2 May 2011 , 4:38am by Marianna46

kristiemarie Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 1:57pm
post #1 of 79

I can't ganache. icon_cry.gif I tried and tried and tried and even though it was *kinda* smooth, it shows right through to the fondant and now it looks crappy. thumbsdown.gif

The first time I used ganache, it turned out the same way. This time I even tried a different technique.

I give up on it. Buttercream is so much more forgiving.

78 replies
MikeRowesHunny Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:11pm
post #2 of 79

If you are using light coloured fondant, then I always use white ganache. Are you using a hot spatula & bench scraper to smooth?

TinkerCakes Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:13pm
post #3 of 79

Did you try this method....
http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

I have only done this once but it turned out great......icon_smile.gif

kristiemarie Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:15pm
post #4 of 79

I tried that method first time and it didn't work out. And this time I just winged it.

I think I just suck at ganaching. Maybe the consistency wasn't right? It wouldn't smooth right or something.

Bri122005 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:16pm
post #5 of 79

Oh, no....ganache is easy. Take 1 cup heavy cream, 2 tbs butter, 2 tbs sugar and heat in the microwave for @ 1 1/2 minutes. Put 12 oz semi-sweet or bitter sweet chocolate in a stainless steel bowl, pour cream mixture over it, cover it with plastic wrap, and let it sit. After 10 minutes or so, take plastic off, mix it for a few minutes (emulsion blender works nicely) and your done. Really, it's very easy! Give it another try.

kristiemarie Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:18pm
post #6 of 79

I didn't put butter or sugar in my mix. The one I used was 1:1 ratio of cream and chocolate.

sweets4you Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:24pm
post #7 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristiemarie

I didn't put butter or sugar in my mix. The one I used was 1:1 ratio of cream and chocolate.




If you use 1:1 ratio, I think that's your reason why you're having problems. For chocolate ganache, use 2:1 ratio.

TexasSugar Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:28pm
post #8 of 79

I've only done the poured ganache myself. But I've been researching how to do it under fondant this week and I think your ratio was off. From what I saw you want a 2:1 ratio (chocolate:cream) for dark and semi sweet chocolate and a 3:1 ratio for milk chocolate or white chocolate.

This ratio is also based off of weights, not cup measurements

kristiemarie Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:33pm
post #9 of 79

Maybe that's why. I'll have to try it with a 2:1 ratio next time and just chalk this up to experience.

DaniNicole Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 2:54pm
post #10 of 79

I agree with PP's, the ratio should be 2:1 for dark chocolate, and 3:1 for white and milk chocolate...that is what worked for me anyway.

Good Luck!

LindaF144a Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 3:13pm
post #11 of 79

I understand if you change the ratio between chocolate and cream you get ganache with different consistencies. Perhaps the recipe you are using is just too stiff or too thin? I would post a link to the different ratios, but this is something I read a long time ago and can't remember where.

DebBTX Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 4:03pm
post #12 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bri122005

Oh, no....ganache is easy. Take 1 cup heavy cream, 2 tbs butter, 2 tbs sugar and heat in the microwave for @ 1 1/2 minutes. Put 12 oz semi-sweet or bitter sweet chocolate in a stainless steel bowl, pour cream mixture over it, cover it with plastic wrap, and let it sit. After 10 minutes or so, take plastic off, mix it for a few minutes (emulsion blender works nicely) and your done. Really, it's very easy! Give it another try.




Hi,
When you use this recipe, is it for pouring over cakes, or as a filling and frosting? Do you use it under fondant?

Thank you for sharing,
Debbie B.

Bri122005 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 8:59pm
post #13 of 79

You can use it to pour over cakes and to whip for fillings. It works well and is pretty forgiving for chocolate. If the chocolate doesn't completely melt the first time, just put it all back in the microwave for 30 sec intervals until it's melted. Also, I scorched the chocolate one time, and after using the emulsion blender for a few minutes, it did smooth out. I've never covered it with fonant. I think it would work out if you keep the fondant a little thicker than normal, but I'm not sure.

pmarks0 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 9:08pm
post #14 of 79

I made ganache for the first time several weeks ago and it turned out great. I used Rose Levey Berenbaum's recipe from her website.

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2007/06/my_first_and_worst_cake.html#more

TiffyB73 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 9:16pm
post #15 of 79

I have been using ganache on my last several cakes and I will NEVER go back to buttercream!! It gave me nothing but headaches! The ganache was so easy, smooth and sturdy under the fondant.

I agree with the previous posts: 2:1 for dark chocolate, 3:1 for white or milk chocolate.

Give it another try... it's definitely worth it!

Marianna46 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 9:33pm
post #16 of 79

I changed to ganache over a year ago and will never go back, either! I live in the tropics. Buttercream is just too moist to put fondant over here. The ganache is more like peanut butter and is less moist, even though it turns to goo, too, once it sits under the fondant for a while in my kitchen! But it's MUCH easier to work with than buttercream.

sugarshack Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 9:36pm
post #17 of 79

1:1 ratio is for a poured glaze or for whipping into a filling or a soft icing.

2:1 is for firm ganache (for use under fondant) that will set up like a chocolate shell 18-24 hours after being smoothed onto the cake

higher than 2:1 will give you firmer ganache shell

white choc for firm

ganache starts at 3:1

HTH!

Kristie925 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 10:13pm
post #18 of 79

I've watched several videos on how to ganache a cake, but I've not tried it yet. Almost everyone that wants a fondant cake asks if I put buttercream under the fondant because they like the taste of the buttercream. I'll have to try the ganache on a cake that's just for my family sometime.

ApplegumPam Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 10:28pm
post #19 of 79

90% of Australian made cakes are ganache under fondant

Fondant is rolled REALLY thin - most aiming for 1/8th of an inch or less these days.

This is a really good photo step by step of a class taken with Faye Cahill in Sydney - http://www.fayecahill.com.au/Wedding/wedding.htm


Tutorial

http://www.notquitenigella.com/2010/11/04/how-to-make-a-two-tier-wedding-cake-with-faye-cahill/

ApplegumPam Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 10:33pm
post #20 of 79

ANOTHER set of tutorials by another talented Aussie






ENJOY!!!!

Coral3 Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 5:03am
post #21 of 79

The book 'Planet Cake' has good instructions for ganache under fondant. Personally I find buttercream a complete nightmare compared to ganache. You can use dark ganache under white fondant, no problems. I roll fondant about 3 or 4 mm thick, and the dark ganache never shows through.

ajwonka Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:33pm
post #22 of 79

What do you use for your chocolate when making white chocolate ganache?

DebBTX Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:35pm
post #23 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarshack

1:1 ratio is for a poured glaze or for whipping into a filling or a soft icing.

2:1 is for firm ganache (for use under fondant) that will set up like a chocolate shell 18-24 hours after being smoothed onto the cake

higher than 2:1 will give you firmer ganache shell

white choc for firm

ganache starts at 3:1

HTH!




Hi Sharon,
I have a question about the ganache under fondant. Since it forms a shell, how do you get the fondant to stick to the shell?

How easy is it to cut through the fondant, then a chocolate shell when serving?

Do you just increase the size of each serving to allow for "shell cracking"?

You and I both live where the heat and humdity can be high. What is going on with the cake under the shell?

Does the shell soften on hot days?

Thank you, Debbie B.

Larkin121 Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:53pm
post #24 of 79

I use ganache on some of my cakes, but I use it at 1:1 ratio because I want to be able to both fill and ice with the same batch. It actually sets up really well, much firmer than BC. But I always refrigerate my cakes because I use perishable fillings.

I use a dark chocolate, and I cover in very thin white fondant and it never shows through. The 1:1 ratio is nice and firm for covering with fondant (but I chill the cake first) and when cut and served is still soft enough not to come across as a shell and more like an icing, which is more pleasing to eat, I think.

debbief Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:53pm
post #25 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumPam

90% of Australian made cakes are ganache under fondant

Fondant is rolled REALLY thin - most aiming for 1/8th of an inch or less these days.

This is a really good photo step by step of a class taken with Faye Cahill in Sydney - http://www.fayecahill.com.au/Wedding/wedding.htm


Tutorial

http://www.notquitenigella.com/2010/11/04/how-to-make-a-two-tier-wedding-cake-with-faye-cahill/




ApplegumPam, thanks for posting these! I've been using ganache under fondant for awhile now, but this is very informative! I'll have to watch those youtube videos next. I'm not addicted to this site, it's my cake decorating school icon_lol.gif

srkmilklady Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:59pm
post #26 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumPam

ANOTHER set of tutorials by another talented Aussie






ENJOY!!!!




These 3 step by step tutorials by Michelle Rea for ganaching a cake I found to be very helpful. Everything is shown and explained from beginning to end.

debbief Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 4:15pm
post #27 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larkin121

I use ganache on some of my cakes, but I use it at 1:1 ratio because I want to be able to both fill and ice with the same batch. It actually sets up really well, much firmer than BC. But I always refrigerate my cakes because I use perishable fillings.

I use a dark chocolate, and I cover in very thin white fondant and it never shows through. The 1:1 ratio is nice and firm for covering with fondant (but I chill the cake first) and when cut and served is still soft enough not to come across as a shell and more like an icing, which is more pleasing to eat, I think.




I think I'm going to try this. Actually, I think I've done it before because I felt like my ganache was just to firm so I added more cream. Seems like as long as you let the ganache set and chill your cake, you will still be able to get the straight sides and sharp edges. Thanks Larkin121 icon_smile.gif

Peridot Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 4:25pm
post #28 of 79

I love ganache and I have used it on my last two cakes ...

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2010995

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1973765

I used chocolate ganache on both. I did not have any problems with the ganache showing through on either of the cakes and I got a beautiful smooth finish on the ganache. I like it so well that I am thinking of no longer using BC.

Marianna46 Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 5:19pm
post #29 of 79

ajwonka, I use any white chocolate or white candy melts. I'm kind of limited here in Mexico by the brands of chocolate I can get, but I've used Fehrback (not sure how to spell it). I see that Callebaut has a factory here now, but I have no idea where to find its products.

DebBTX, the ganache doesn't form a shell unless you put the cake in the fridge right up until serving time. And it especially doesn't form a shell in the heat and humidity of Texas! Actually, what happens is that it gets to the consistency of peanut butter before you spread it on the cake. Once it's on the cake, the thinness of the layer you use lets it firm up even more, even without refrigeration.

But once you put the fondant on and it's been there for a while, the ganache gets softer, so there's no worry about cutting through a "shell" or any of that. At least, this has been my experience in my non-AC kitchen in Cancún.

ThreeLittleBlackbirds Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 5:34pm
post #30 of 79

I agree with Peridot, I use ganache on all my cakes now under the fondant. You will be amazed at how easy and smooth the fondant goes on! Plus i think it keep the cake itself fresher because it seals it better than BC.

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2015364

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%