Ganache Coverage Chart

Decorating By TexasSugar Updated 27 Apr 2011 , 8:08pm by TexasSugar

TexasSugar Posted 26 Apr 2011 , 10:27pm
post #1 of 6

Does anyone know of a chart, alot like the Wilton charts for how much ganache it takes to cover different size cakes? Would the amount be similar to how much buttercream it would take to ice a cake? If so, can someone share the amount of ganache their recipe makes?

I'm thinking about trying this on a cake this weekend, but I'm trying to figure out if I want to spend the money on the chocolate for it. Which means I need a idea of how much chocolate I would need to buy.

I'm doing two layer round cakes, 6in, 8in and 10in.

I'll be doing both semi sweet and white chocolate. I've read up on the ratios of using those. I am just wondering if someone can tell me 2lbs of chocolate will go such and such far. That would be a huge help for me!

Thanks!

5 replies
cutiepiecupcake Posted 26 Apr 2011 , 11:54pm
post #2 of 6

On a previous thread regarding ganache, member Rylan answered a similiar question. His response was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan


Brian, it all depends on the thickness. With 6 pounds of chocolate and 3 pounds of cream, I could cover a 10", 8", and two 6" rounds (4"-5" tall) with some extra. As of thickness...you know how the cake board is bigger than the cake? I use that as the guide.




I only ever use ganache to cover and fill prior to fondant.. I used about 1.2kgs of chocolate to cover a 12" square (2 layers of cake at 2")... it covered and filled it nicely without any left overs. However, I do like to be safe and make extra most of the time. The left overs make wickedly sinful cake truffles, or it freezes up a treat.

HTH

TexasSugar Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 12:17am
post #3 of 6

Thank you! That does help! I'm going to be covering the cake in fondant, which is why I thought I would try it. The only ganache I have done was poured and for smaller cakes.

This cake is for my SIL so it would be a great cake to practice on. I just have to decide if I want to buy the chocolate for it, on top of the fondant.

jleigh982 Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 1:09am
post #4 of 6

it is definitely worth using under the fondant! and thats a great cake to practice on...a while back a fellow CC'er (cant remember his name) passed on a recipe to me on a ganache to use under fondant because he said it would give my cakes a more sleek look with sharper edges...boy was he right!!! before when i used icing my cakes seemed to have a more "rounded" corner look and in order to get stiffer icing i had to add more sugar, which made it way too sweet. with the ganache i dont have to worry about it. i make a batch, let it sit covered for a few hours, put it on the cake and let the cake set overnight (just for good measure lol) before covering with fondant. ive never had a bad result and people who have had my cakes before and after RAVE about how they taste now, they all want to know what my secret is that i changed in my cakes. the great taste alone makes it worth the extra money, which i find is not much of a difference from icing...best thing IT STANDS ITS GROUND IN THIS TEXAS HEAT!!! lol ...now if only i could find the time to upload all the recent cakes ive done since the switch

Bluehue Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 1:20am
post #5 of 6

TexasSugar - if you find you have any left over - pop it into a container and freeze it - it will be good for up to three months. icon_smile.gif

Bluehue

TexasSugar Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 8:08pm
post #6 of 6

Thanks everyone! I'm leaning towards the ganache.

I don't do alot of fondant covered cakes, since my family doesn't really care for the chewiness. My SIL does like it, and the design they picked really needs fondant. It's a western baby shower cake, with the pants on the bottom, cow print cake in the middle, and red bandana on top.

It'd be a good practice cake, but at the same time it affects what I spend on the cake as well.

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