Cake And Buttercream Recipes Needed For A Diabetic.

Baking By Vanessa7 Updated 11 Aug 2011 , 10:50pm by elizaBakes

Vanessa7 Posted 22 Mar 2011 , 3:02am
post #1 of 13

I have a request for a mother's day cake for a family full of diabetics. What would I substitute for powdered sugar in b.c.? Could I just substitute splenda in the WASC recipe? If not, does anyone have a good cake (vanilla) and buttercream recipe for diabetics? I've tried to search recipes here on CC but have come up short and would really appreciate your advice and help. Thanks!

12 replies
Vanessa7 Posted 22 Mar 2011 , 10:47am
post #2 of 13

Anyone baked cakes for diabetics that would be willing to direct me to good recipes? Please? icon_biggrin.gif

caymancake Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 3:52am
post #3 of 13

I use the splenda yellow cake recipe which is on the bag. For icing, I use 1 pint of heavy whipping cream, 16 oz of cream cheese, 1 pk of sugar free vanilla pudding and 3 tbsp of splenda. Whip the whipping cream until soft peaks form. Add the remaining ingredients and beat until light and fluffy. Hope that helps!

sebrina Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 4:14am
post #4 of 13

I spent years as the assistant for one of the top diabetes educators in the nation. Just so you know, it's carbs in general that raise blood sugar. Not just sugar. The least carbs is going to be in a cheesecake made with Splenda without any crust. Now the decorator in me says icon_cry.gif when someone wants a cheesecake. But I recently discovered that it is possible to decorate without any icing. I can use fondant decorations & cover an entire cake! icon_smile.gif
All of that being said, any person with diabetes knows that the key to good control is moderation. And everyone needs a piece of cake! thumbs_up.gif

HTH!

Vanessa7 Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 4:43am
post #5 of 13

Sebrina, I wish it were that easy to just make a cheesecake. However, they want a "real" cake. How do you keep the fondant adhered to the cake if you don't have bc or ganache underneath?

Caymancake, Thank you for your help and recipes. I'm assuming the icing is non-crusting right? Is it stable enough to decorate with?

caymancake Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 11:56am
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanessa7

Sebrina, I wish it were that easy to just make a cheesecake. However, they want a "real" cake. How do you keep the fondant adhered to the cake if you don't have bc or ganache underneath?

Caymancake, Thank you for your help and recipes. I'm assuming the icing is non-crusting right? Is it stable enough to decorate with?




It's stable enough to ice and do simple decorations like borders and writing. The key is to make sure your bowl and paddles are cold. I refrigerate to help it set up and I also keep the frosting in the fridge in between icings to make sure it stays stable. It actually tastes ok -not too artificial tasting at all.

dzh115 Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 2:46am
post #7 of 13

I was at the grocery store today and found powder sugar substitute. It's called "Ideal Confectionery Low Calorie Sweetener". I have not tried it but it could be a very good alternative to regular powdered sugar.

chefandbaker Posted 21 Jul 2011 , 5:30pm
post #8 of 13

you could also try xyitol. Works great for SMBC/IMBC.

bakerliz Posted 21 Jul 2011 , 5:50pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefandbaker

you could also try xyitol. Works great for SMBC/IMBC.




My experience with xyitol is that it leaves a strange sort of "cold" feeling (I don't know how else to describe it) in your mouth...Do you get that with your recipe?

jason_kraft Posted 21 Jul 2011 , 5:55pm
post #10 of 13

Ideal sweetener is made with xylitol and sucralose (Splenda). We looked into xylitol for low-glycemic baking but unfortunately it has the side effect of acting like a laxative in many people.

We spend several months working on creating a traditional cake and frosting product for diabetics (our specialty is food allergies so this seemed like a natural side market) but in the end we couldn't come up with something we would be willing to charge money for. If I was diabetic I would rather have a few bites of regular cake instead of a normal-sized piece of low-glycemic cake.

chefandbaker Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 9:22pm
post #11 of 13

@bakerliz, I got the idea from here:
http://www.domestifluff.com/2009/04/sugar-free-swiss-meringue-buttercream/

I just had a cake tasting two weeks ago for a SF wedding cake and the bride had no complaints about this! She actually chose this frosting and a whipped chocolate ganache for her SF cakes.

I work with her too, and she didn't complain about any "effects" after the tasting.
icon_smile.gif

KathysCC Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 10:35pm
post #12 of 13

Have you asked them if they want a sugar-free cake? As a diabetic myself, I know that controlling blood sugar is about the carbs and not necessarily the sugar content. Any cake made with flour is full of carbs. Using sugar substitutes doesn't necessarily help that much. They may want a real cake. I'd definitely ask them first.

Also, you have to be careful with xylitol. Large amounts of that are rough on the intestional tract.

elizaBakes Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 10:50pm
post #13 of 13

My Father is diabetic and I COMPLETELY Agree with moderation & that everything turns into sugar eventually..carbs are the problem BUT-

Can I give you a cheap way out (im shaking my head at myself right now) Have you seen the Pillsbury brand cake box mix sugar free? comes in yellow and chocolate also brownies, I know its a box mix icon_sad.gif

Or, the Hershey's cocoa container has a chocolate cake recipe on it, we substituded the sugar for splenda (1 cup) and it turns out fantastic!
Frosting....I use a non-dairy based whipped cream called Pastry Pride/ Frostin' Pride. It's low in sugar contance and non-dairy so its safe to sit out and stable enough to decorate with

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