High Altitude Recipe

Baking By apesusi Updated 7 Aug 2014 , 9:28pm by TheBakingNurse

apesusi Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 4:03am
post #1 of 15

This is getting ridiculous. I cannot get any recipe to work!

I'm in Colorado and this high altitude baking is driving me crazy! All of my cakes fall, and when I make the high altitude adjustment and they finally rise enough, they're dry and crumble.

Can anyone help me?! I need a good high altitude recipe!

14 replies
KateLS Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 4:27am
post #2 of 15

Amen! Same here. I'd love some recipes too. Scratch cakes hate me, and I think this is the reason.

Thank you, anyone, in advance!

Elcee Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 4:45am
post #3 of 15

I don't use recipes specifically for high altitude, I make adjustments.

Are you baking at a lower temp and for a slightly shorter time? I bake at 325 and start checking for doneness 10 minutes before the recipe calls for and every 2 minutes after that if it not ready.

Recipes with buttermilk tend to work better than others.

Try separating your eggs, whip the whites to semi stiff peaks and fold into the batter at the very end.

Keep trying recipes until you find a few that work; seems like not all recipes convert to high altitude.

The Colorado chapter of ICES has a cookbook available that is billed as "keeping high altitude cooking in mind" and is available here: http://www.coices.org/Products.html.

There's a wealth of information in the book Chocolate Snowball by Letty Halloran Flatt who is the executive pastry chef at Deer Valley Resort in Utah.

HTH

KateLS Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 4:52am
post #4 of 15

Thank you, so mcuh, Elcee! I'll try your advice and also look up that site!

KateLS Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 4:56am
post #5 of 15

apesusi, so I just came across this thread! I think I'm in love!

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=6737593#6737593

I like the link on there.

http://www.handmadeinhighplaces.com

Elcee Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 5:01am
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by KateLS

I like the link on there.

http://www.handmadeinhighplaces.com




Charity was my Wilton instructor! icon_biggrin.gif

KateLS Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 5:07am
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elcee

Quote:
Originally Posted by KateLS

I like the link on there.

http://www.handmadeinhighplaces.com



Charity was my Wilton instructor! icon_biggrin.gif




Awesome! It's a small world in the caking world. =)

apesusi Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 3:11am
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elcee

I don't use recipes specifically for high altitude, I make adjustments.

Are you baking at a lower temp and for a slightly shorter time? I bake at 325 and start checking for doneness 10 minutes before the recipe calls for and every 2 minutes after that if it not ready.

HTH




Baking at a lower temp for a shorter time? Everywhere I've looked says bake at a higher temp for a shorter time...


I've tried making adjustments and it's just not working. *sigh*

Guess I'll just keep trying. I just feel like I could have awesome cakes if I could just get the actual "cake" part to work!

Elcee Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 12:27am
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by apesusi

Baking at a lower temp for a shorter time? Everywhere I've looked says bake at a higher temp for a shorter time...


I've tried making adjustments and it's just not working. *sigh*

Guess I'll just keep trying. I just feel like I could have awesome cakes if I could just get the actual "cake" part to work!




What's your actual altitude? If you're really up there (over 7000') or just borderline (3000'-5000') you may need to use different adjustments (I'm at around 6300'). I've never read anything about baking at a higher temp. Where did you see that? My source doesn't say anything about the lower baking temp or shorter time; it's something I tried on my own. It works for me, my cakes taste as good as they look. If your cakes aren't coming out anyway, what does it hurt to give it a try?

apesusi Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 4:00am
post #10 of 15

I was doing a google search on high altitude baking last week when I was trying to get my cake to rise. The first 10 links I looked at all said to increase the temp. I just googled "high altitude adjustments cake"

http://www.pillsburybaking.com/bakers_corner/high_altitude_baking.aspx
http://allrecipes.com//HowTo/high-altitude-cake-baking/Detail.aspx
http://www.swcoloradohome.com/articles/food/020114_b.asp
http://www.thecookinginn.com/haltitude.html


I'm not disagreeing with you! icon_smile.gif I was just making sure I was reading what you wrote correctly. I'll try lowering the temp as well. Thanks for talking it out with me!

Reasontobakecake Posted 22 Mar 2013 , 10:45pm
post #11 of 15

I know this thread started a while ago, but I had some advice: "High altitude" includes those that live at 3500-10000 and at each level there are tricks, at some heights you need to lower the temp some you raise the temp.  I just read "Pie in the Sky" and have made about 5 different cakes now, they all turned out beautiful!  ( i am at 5000ft).  In the book she has recipes but she also explains the science of why to help you change any current recipes that you may have, it really is an amazing book. 

TheBakingNurse Posted 3 Apr 2014 , 8:33pm
post #12 of 15

AI have really struggled with scratch baking! I am at 6500 ft. I too have to lower my temp aNd bake for a shorter period. Most of the time my cakes will rise and then fall the last 10-15 min of baking

momo4s Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 6:30am
post #14 of 15

AMy trusty recipes failed when I moved to colorado springs. My sour cream cakes would all fall, and come out sticky, too moist etc....Yuck! My husband cant have dairy so we made one for our family using dairy free sour cream (Tofutti Sour Supreme from Safeway or Whole Foods) and it turned out perfect!!! Worth a try!

TheBakingNurse Posted 7 Aug 2014 , 9:28pm
post #15 of 15


thank  you

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