What Is The Etiquette Involved Here?

Decorating By kathyx1 Updated 15 Feb 2011 , 4:45am by AmyBee89

kathyx1 Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:00am
post #1 of 21

I've had a few requests for a tutorial/instructions on how to make the dress up babies (recently added to my pics) and I'm wondering is it considered poor form to supply instructions that are not my own. I included the designer's name and her book title in the info but don't mind sharing here on cc how it's done.

20 replies
sebrina Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:26am
post #2 of 21

Hmm... good question! icon_confused.gif I would think some simple instructions wouldn't hurt, as long as you credit where you learned it from. But I would wonder about doing a tutorial? I am interested to see what others would say though.

myslady Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:31am
post #3 of 21

Since they are not your original instructions, just the author's name and the name of the book is fine. The book is more than likely copyrighted as well, which also prevents you from posting it in a public forum.

cheatize Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:31am
post #4 of 21

When in doubt, don't. You can direct them to where to get the instructions. You could also tell them to try their local library or try the "look inside" feature on Amazon. If it makes you uncomfortable, don't do it.

pummy Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:52am
post #5 of 21

You provided the author and title of the book that was more than enough. Your babies are cute by the way!

j0z1e Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 5:57am
post #6 of 21

If you're really interested in doing the tutorials you could always try e-mailing her to ask for her permission. She has some videos on her site and her facebook page so she may be ok with it, or maybe it would let her know that there is interest and she can do her own videos.

mburkett Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 6:19am
post #7 of 21

She's got a copywritten book. I'm sure she'd rather sell her book than to have you provide any instruction and tutorials. Doing so would be a violation of copyright laws. Giving credit to her book for the figures you made is great but you really shouldn't do any more than that. I saw the figurines this morning and first thing I thought about was to go find the book myself. (They really are fantastic).

kathyx1 Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 7:19am
post #8 of 21

Thanks, I agree with everyone, I wasn't comfortable with the idea of giving instructions and of course copyright comes into it. Frances also offers workshops so that settled the matter in my mind. I highly recommend the book, very easy instructions and lots of ideas! icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 8:16pm
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathyx1

Thanks, I agree with everyone, I wasn't comfortable with the idea of giving instructions and of course copyright comes into it. Frances also offers workshops so that settled the matter in my mind. I highly recommend the book, very easy instructions and lots of ideas! icon_smile.gif




Good call ! I have the book and it's wonderful. The directions and photos are clear and easy to replicate.

My personal policy is that if I take a class that I've paid for, then I share info on how to take the class, but NOT the particulars of the technique(s) taught. If it's a free demo, the I'll share. If it's from a book, then only the author & title.

Rae

tryingcake Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 12:05am
post #10 of 21

so which of any tutorial is an original?

tiggy2 Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 12:19am
post #11 of 21

I saw your original post and it thought it was tacky for someone to ask for a tutorial when you gave them the name of the book and the author. First thing I did was to find the book on amazon icon_smile.gif

tryingcake Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 2:03am
post #12 of 21

I agree that we need to buy books when people print them. But is she HONESTLY the inventor of this? I have a hard time believing in this day and age any idea is new. It's revamped, given new life, etc... but is it really new?

BlakesCakes Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 2:29am
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tryingcake

I agree that we need to buy books when people print them. But is she HONESTLY the inventor of this? I have a hard time believing in this day and age any idea is new. It's revamped, given new life, etc... but is it really new?




No one said it was new. No one said she was the "inventor". She did, however, put her own spin on it and publish a copyrighted book detailing the instructions.

Why should the OP, who spent the money on the book, and her own time and materials to practice, educate others for free? The book is readily available and it's not expensive.

You're welcome to your scepticism about any idea being new, but I still applaud the integrity and honesty of someone choosing to recognize that it's more ethical to direct people to the author and teacher of the technique rather than to take credit for herself.

Rae

sweetflowers Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 2:31am
post #14 of 21

If Kathyx revamped or gave new life to what she learned and putting her own style and twist on them, then she would be making her own babies in clothes. But if she is repeating what she saw in a book, I really think people should buy the book. I also saw those cute little things this morning and I was taken aback by people wanting a tutorial (for free) when she had to pay for the book, I always find that a hard pill to swallow. Then they wanted her to have to put time and effort into making the tutorial, for free too.

You are right, a lot of things are re-invented, but people put their own twist on them and their own style and experience into teaching, look at the Lambeth and oriental stringwork that is taught as an example.

dulcearoma Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 2:37am
post #15 of 21

I don't think there is anything wrong with doing a tutorial as long as you mention where you got it from. Honestly has anyone ever check out you tube. I'm pretty sure we have all learned a thing or two from someone else who was not the original creator. I would love to be able to buy all the cake decorating books out there and have all the time in the world to read them all but I can't. I like to think we are all here to help and learn from one another with out getting so technical. Just my thoughts.

tryingcake Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 2:40am
post #16 of 21

I applaud her also, and have chosen the same route in the past - so before you decide what you know and don't know about me back up - I was only questioning is this really a new technique? Not the OP actions.

Next time I teach someone how to ice a cake smooth, who should I thank?

We give credit where we can. But mark my word - in a year or less, everyone will be making those babies and no one will know who started it. Who started making booties? Who started CTs? Or BCTs? or Cupcake cakes - and I doubt it was the person who made the little yellow pamphlet on it, which I bought, btw. No one knows who started any of this. And those babies are not originals either. We have been seeing things like this for years.... in polymer - which uses the same techniques as sugarpaste.

I agree that the OP should not financially support the world and pay for directions while others ride her back. Let them go buy their own books. But my statement had nothing to do with this at all.

kathyx1 Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 3:13am
post #17 of 21

To be fair to the 1st person who asked for instructions, I hadn't originally included details of the book but when I saw that there was probably going to be a couple of inquiries, I edited my post straight away to include the info.
It doesn't matter whether something has been done before, to me it was new and Frances McNaughton showed me icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 3:16am
post #18 of 21

Well........I've spent thousands of dollars on classes and books. For the most part, money well spent.

I'm extremely fortunate to have been able to do it and I know that.

But, having spent all of that time & money, I just can't see how it would be fair (or ethical) to the authors and teachers, let alone myself, to go around spreading the details for free--especially if I know exactly where to send someone for the book or class.

If they can't afford it, then they may have to do what they can to figure it out on their own. That's just a part of the learning process.

Yes, I know that others do it, but that doesn't make it OK. It just means that they can justify something I can't.

Some techniques are fairly universal, like making a gum paste rose, but if someone comes up with a "twist" on that technique and they write a book about it or teach a class on it, they have the right to be remunerated for it if they choose to seek remuneration. I don't have the right to "take" that from them.

Rae

dulcearoma Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 3:25am
post #19 of 21

BlakesCakes.......I am soooooooooo happy that you spent thousands of dollars on books and classes....kudos to you.
It's not that serious. An honest question with honest answers.

tiggy2 Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 4:31am
post #20 of 21

I have spent a lot of money on DVDs and I suppose some of you think it would be ok for me to copy those and pass them out freely and deprive the creators of income..........not in my world.

AmyBee89 Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 4:45am
post #21 of 21

I saw your exquisite babies (way out of my skill level, but I can dream!) and immediately requested the book from interlibrary loan. Completely free to me and completely ethical! I've read a lot of really awesome books that way, and if ever one is so awesome I need it I can buy it myself.

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