Can I Freeze Hi Ratio Shortening?

Decorating By MissyTex Updated 13 Feb 2011 , 10:51pm by graciesj

MissyTex Posted 9 Feb 2011 , 7:12pm
post #1 of 17

Will freezing it increase it's shelf life?

The only quantities I can buy are 3 lbs. or 50 lbs. The 50 lb. cube is a much better value, but it would go bad before I would use it all. I'm about to throw out quite a bit of what I have left from the box I bought at least a year ago. I don't know if it is "bad", but it is not super white anymore. I need to buy some more but I hate to spend $10 on 3 lbs. I was wondering if I bought the cube if I could portion it out and freeze half of it.

Thanks!

16 replies
ceshell Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 6:23am
post #2 of 17

Yes, freeze it! I portion it out into whatever amount I normally use in a recipe, wrap tightly with plastic wrap (twice) and then into a ziploc. Good Luck!

cheatize Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 6:35am
post #3 of 17

Will it be okay in the freezer for longer than a year?

ceshell Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 8:23pm
post #4 of 17

That's a hard question to answer. Generally the freezer life of *anything* is no longer than a year...isn't it? That doesn't mean it won't last, but I wouldn't specifically AIM for it to stay fresh that long. It wouldn't become unsafe to eat, but whether or not it retains its quality is impossible to know. I would think some of that would depend on how airtight it was wrapped, your freezer's temp., etc.

mommynana Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 8:34pm
post #5 of 17

what is the life on it if its in a air tight contaner and not frozen??

ceshell Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 7:43am
post #6 of 17

Hm, I don't know the answer to that, but technically regular shortening is supposed to be good for 1 year after opening, if stored in a cool, dry place. I've had it go bad in under a year, which is why I followed CC suggestions to freeze my (more-expensive) hi-ratio as a precaution. I don't know if/how Hi-Ratio differs with regard to storage... Anyone?

mommynana Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 2:16pm
post #7 of 17

ceshell, could one use hi- ratio instead of reg shorting or dose the recipe have to be different for hi-ratio

Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 3:05pm
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommynana

ceshell, could one use hi- ratio instead of reg shorting or dose the recipe have to be different for hi-ratio




mommynana, if you are making icings, you just use high-ratio instead of standard shortening. If you are using it in cakes, you have to make sure the high-ratio is marked "for cakes" or "for icing and cakes." High ratio should not be used for frying. hth icon_smile.gif

cakegrandma Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 3:09pm
post #9 of 17

I pack my 50# high ratio into containers that are pretty much airtight and just set them in the freezer. I have held a package or 2 for over the year and it was just fine. Do make sure you have a good tight lid and don't overfill the containers.
evelyn

HobbyCaker Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 3:51pm
post #10 of 17

I buy the 50# also, weigh it out in batches, wrap in plastic wrap, then into an air tight containter and pop into the freezer, then I can just pull out a batch when I need it.

mommynana Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 3:56pm
post #11 of 17

sangriacupcakes, lol i no enough not to use it for frying, what im asking is for ex. i usualy use indydebis buttercream and use reg. shorting, could the hi-ratio be put in to replace the reg. or would i have to change anything else

jade8 Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 4:29pm
post #12 of 17

i cant find it but there is a forum post about indydebi's buttercream where this is discussed. some have said that you should use 3/4 the amount of high ratio when subbing regular shortening. otherwise it gets too greasy feeling.

Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 6:12pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade8

i cant find it but there is a forum post about indydebi's buttercream where this is discussed. some have said that you should use 3/4 the amount of high ratio when subbing regular shortening. otherwise it gets too greasy feeling.




I don't know why Indydebi's would be greasy with high ratio...that icing recipe includes Dream Whip, which is basically a bunch of emulsifiers. High ratio already includes emulsifiers, so why would you want to use Dream Whip? lol! If you like the way Indybebi's is working for you, then don't change the type of shortening. But if you're looking for something smoother, then try Edna's buttercream:

http://designmeacake.com/bcrec.html

Or Sugar Shack's:

http://cakentral.com/recipes/5163/sugarshacks-icing-and-tips

Both icings are wonderfully smooth & creamy made with high ratio.

Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 6:19pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommynana

sangriacupcakes, lol i no enough not to use it for frying, what im asking is for ex. i usualy use indydebis buttercream and use reg. shorting, could the hi-ratio be put in to replace the reg. or would i have to change anything else




mommynana, I was sure you knew not to use the high ratio for frying, but since I was pointing out the different types of high ratio shortening, I just thought I'd throw that out there for anybody who didn't.............umm, that would include my DD who once tried to make fried chicken with my precious high ratio!! icon_lol.gif

I hope I answered your question above. BTW, I understand your quest for the "perfect" buttercream. I think I've tried just about every recipe out there! My favorites have turned out to be Edna's, SugarShack's, and SMBC made with half butter and half high-ratio.

mommynana Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 6:41pm
post #15 of 17

thanks sangriacupcakes, thats funny about ur DD did he like the chicken?

Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 8:02pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommynana

thanks sangriacupcakes, thats funny about ur DD did he like the chicken?




It was completely inedible...mushy on the outside & raw on the inside!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

graciesj Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 10:51pm
post #17 of 17

very interesting ladies. thank-youicon_smile.gif

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