Another "job Position" Question :) Salary!

Business By BethLS Updated 1 Oct 2010 , 8:13am by Krystina418

BethLS Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 2:29am
post #1 of 10

Hello everyone!

Sorry to post another "job" related question icon_wink.gif

So I have been achin' to get back into a bakery for quite some time now, and finally might have that option. I got a call from said bakery today. I put my application in about two weeks ago, and they replied back with "we're waiting to review other potential employees and we'll call you if you fit our needs". We agreed for an interview at Monday morning. She asked what time works best for me, knowing I'd be driving quite a ways away, she map quest'd me icon_lol.gif

The downside: New potential bakery is about 90 minutes from my home on a good day. (relocating is not an option) & (I am currently driving about 40 minutes to work now)

This bakery is a very reputable place, and is high volumn...I'm very excited about the opprotunity.

So my questions being, would you let mileage stop you?

What is the going salary rate for a decorator in your area? (this will be in the Detroit area, fyi)

And secondly, we did not discuss salary requirements during the brief phone conversation we held this afternoon. (but like I said, she KNOWS how far I will be driving) Is this something discussed during the interview? (Hey, I have extremely lengthy stays with my employers!) And how do you bring this up without sounding horrible?

I really would hate to get there and have me fall in love with the place, and them love me, to find out its not comprobable for me to work there.

Thank-you all in advance!

9 replies
afunk Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 9:42am
post #2 of 10

I have always looked at an interview as a two way street. Everything they want to know about you, you should learn about them. Among things like how do they operate? Do they offer benefits, and if so, what? I think you should definately talk salary. (A ballpark figure at least.) You should both be on the same page. I have been offered jobs that I turned down because of things I learned in the interview.

Good luck! And I hope this helps!

MissLisa Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 11:20am
post #3 of 10

"90 minutes on a good day?" Just how many "good days" do we have in the Detroit area? (think the whole winter season in addition to traffic accidents year 'round)

90 minutes on a good day can translate to 2-3 hours on a bad day! For me, I take the drive time into consideration simply because that is time away from my home and family.

Think about it this way. Let's say you get paid $10 an hour and you work 8 hour days. That's $80 a day (pre tax) now lets figure in the 3 hours of driving (round trip) You're still making the same $80 and your hourly rate just dropped to $7.27

Is this a full-time or part-time position? If it's part-time and you are only working a 4 hour day do you really want to drive 3 hours to work 4? (now your hourly rate went to $5.71 based on the same $10 per hour)

Good luck in your decision!

neecerator Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 12:00pm
post #4 of 10

I wish you all the best, no matter what is decided. Even though the pay is not usually very high these days (for some reason), at least you'll get out of the house and be with people, and be working in your area of expertise. It will also look good on a resume, and help with your personal happiness and future. That's how I look at it.

I work at a VERY famous Pittsburgh bakery just seasonally. If I stayed home because the pay wasn't very good, then I wouldn't have learned anything, and I'd be at home having the winter 'blues', and wouldn't make any money at all. So you have to weigh out what is best for you and your family.

Sincerely,
Neecerator icon_razz.gifthumbs_up.gif

CakeDiva101 Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 12:21pm
post #5 of 10

[quote="MissLisa"]"90 minutes on a good day?" Just how many "good days" do we have in the Detroit area? (think the whole winter season in addition to traffic accidents year 'round)

90 minutes on a good day can translate to 2-3 hours on a bad day! For me, I take the drive time into consideration simply because that is time away from my home and family.

Think about it this way. Let's say you get paid $10 an hour and you work 8 hour days. That's $80 a day (pre tax) now lets figure in the 3 hours of driving (round trip) You're still making the same $80 and your hourly rate just dropped to $7.27

Is this a full-time or part-time position? If it's part-time and you are only working a 4 hour day do you really want to drive 3 hours to work 4? (now your hourly rate went to $5.71 based on the same $10 per hour)


Another thing you need to consider is the gas prices and wear on your car. Also, will you be learning new things and getting experience?.

I wish you luck! Keep me posted.

Brittany

matthewkyrankelly Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 12:44pm
post #6 of 10

Three hours commute! Unless it is a six to seven figure salary - no way. I would think that you could take the money you would spend on gas and eating out,(Let's face it - you would never cook a meal at home with that commute!), and just use your "extra" three hours a day to practice at home and you'd be awesome.

For that matter, you could probably take minimum wage at someplace 15 minutes away and break even or be ahead of the game financially.

It would have to be one of the best in the industry and I would consider it a class, not a job. I don't see how you will make money at this and any mental gain would quickly fade in the commute.

BethLS Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 1:09pm
post #7 of 10

Exactly what I needed to hear everyone!

I already work part time at a large university (15$ an hour, 40 minutes away) 25 hours a week. I typically do 2-4 cakes on the weekends.

I soley was considering tihs job as an opprotunity for advancement (in my career) because simply put, I will never advance where I'm at (I can't as I'm non-union, and can never be, long story) and I've been there working on 4 years. I'm in a dead-end job that pays well, basically! I certainly don't see myself working there for the rest of my life (again, dead end) and don't know what else to do about it. I am quite young still (25) and just want to do things RIGHT and not get steered into the wrong directions. Oh, and for those asking, I do have a family)

I COULD NOT go work for this company if they didn't offer me what I'm making now. That why I was asking the ball park figures, I didn't want to be shocked Monday icon_wink.gif

(Oh again, for those who asked, it would be full time employment)


Thanks again! Any addition advice would be fantastic!

IsaSW Posted 30 Sep 2010 , 4:00pm
post #8 of 10

Funny, It's raining here and it took me 90 minutes to get to work this morning, normally is 30 minutes. And I thought.... I could never commute 3 hours a day. It would make my life so miserable!. I am sure there is people out there that do it, but I couldn't, I would be wasting my time.
Hey you are so young, that is not a dead end job.
I thought the same thing 8 years ago, when I got my job.
Because my creative juices were not being used at my full time job, they had to escape some how, and that is how I started my business.
I love my paycheck and I love that my cake business is growing.
Wouldn't have it any other way.
I know you will find what you are looking for. Trust in God.

Unlimited Posted 1 Oct 2010 , 6:58am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BethLS

Exactly what I needed to hear everyone! ...I didn't want to be shocked Monday icon_wink.gif




It sounds like you've already gotten the answers that you were looking formost agree to keep the semi-local job that you already have. Are you really going to travel to the interview on Monday if you're having second thoughts?

Absolutely, I would let mileage stop me from considering a job that far away especially if relocating isn't an option. I figured out a long time ago that God didn't put me on this planet to sit in traffic twice a day! Even if the job isn't stressful, traffic and a long commute would make me crazy. There are so many more productive things that I could be doing besides sitting in a car!

I wouldn't be surprised if the employer is having second thoughts about your commute as well. The few times that I've hired employees from an hour or so away didn't work out. Perhaps you are a loyal and dedicated worker, yet there will be days that you'll be late (or absent) for reasons beyond your control, and they're left wondering who will show up to do the work. (I know it's not your problem as an employee, but the owner/manager has to consider this with any employee.)

If you keep up your caking on the weekends, at least you'll be there for your family when they need you. Enjoy your children while you canthey grow up way too fast! (Just my two cents.)

Krystina418 Posted 1 Oct 2010 , 8:13am
post #10 of 10

If I were basing this on mileage only, I would not let it stop me from a great opportunity. I live in Oregon, where we have a lot of rain and sometimes nasty winters (nothing compared to Detroit, but still). I don't know if you have children or not, so that might be a deal breaker if you consider the "bad day" drive time. But where I live it's not uncommon for people to drive over an hour to work.

I would go to the interview with a number that I wanted to have to make it worth my while, and if they can't do it then...decision made icon_smile.gif

Good luck!

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