Freezing Cake?

Decorating By SSGirly Updated 6 Sep 2010 , 11:57pm by JustGettinStarted

SSGirly Posted 31 Aug 2010 , 7:15pm
post #1 of 20

I know I can, but do I wait until it is totally cooled? or do i do it while it is still slightly warm?

19 replies
cakesdivine Posted 31 Aug 2010 , 8:30pm
post #2 of 20

I freeze directly from the oven. If you prep the cake pan properly (spray release like Bakers Joy, and put parchment in bottom of pan) and you wrap it properly with Press N'Seal wrap. Pop them in a dedicated cake freezer (don't put in a freezer with other foods) you will get a super moist cake.icon_smile.gif

AileenGP Posted 31 Aug 2010 , 8:57pm
post #3 of 20

I freeze after it's cooled a bit (warm to touch but not hot). I triple wrap the slightly warm cakes in plastic wrap and pop them in the freezer on a cookie sheet so they freeze flat. After they're frozen, I can stack them on top of each other.

MessMaker Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:00pm
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by AileenGP

I freeze after it's cooled a bit (warm to touch but not hot). I triple wrap the slightly warm cakes in plastic wrap and pop them in the freezer on a cookie sheet so they freeze flat. After they're frozen, I can stack them on top of each other.




Me too. This is only the second one for me, so I am not all that exp. in freezing cakes, I guess you could say I'm learning by trial and error.icon_lol.gif

So here is my question, should I level my cake before or after I freeze it?

leily Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:04pm
post #5 of 20

I wait for my cakes to cool completely. I like to then level and tort my cake (so it's ready to go when i want to decorate). I double/tripple wrap in plastic wrap and put on a cookie tray and then in the freezer to freeze. Once completely frozen I stack them up in the deep freeze.

cakesdivine Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:05pm
post #6 of 20

After. The cake will level out somewhat during the cooling/freezing process. Let it defrost UNWRAPPED about 15 minutes before you level and/or torte.

catlharper Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:33pm
post #7 of 20

I bake, cool completely, level, torte and wrap each layer in press and seal and then stack the wrapped layers and wrap again. Freeze at least overnight then unwrap, fill and crumbcoat while frozen. Let settle and come to room temp at least three hours to help prevent gas/air bubble problems then do the final coating of BC or Fondant.

Cat

JustGettinStarted Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:52pm
post #8 of 20

I'm so confused by all of the different advice. Some people say to thaw completely (covered) before doing any icing, other say not to. Some say to thaw the cake covered, some say to uncover. I'm guessing maybe there isn't a right way or a wrong way, just what someone prefers. Maybe? Anyone know differently?

catlharper Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:42pm
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustGettinStarted

I'm so confused by all of the different advice. Some people say to thaw completely (covered) before doing any icing, other say not to. Some say to thaw the cake covered, some say to uncover. I'm guessing maybe there isn't a right way or a wrong way, just what someone prefers. Maybe? Anyone know differently?




Just about every piece of advice you will get here will be based on their own personal experience. For instance, I have found that icing a thawed cake can be harder and messer because I work with tender cakes like chiffon and not denser cakes like pound cake. I've also found that thawing them out inside the plastic wrap gives me a gooey top due to the moisture. What works for me is to fill and crumbcoat while still frozen but that's not necessarily what will work for you. It's trial and error. Pick whatever parts you think sound like they would work for you and give them a try.

Something else to remember as well. We are all located all over the world. For instance my humidity in Northern CA is about 25% but in AZ it's about 8% and in Alabama it could be 68%! Quite the different baking conditions and decorating conditions...and that's just those of us in the US! So some things will work for your part of the world that wouldn't work for me and some things will work for me that will not work for you. Trial and error. Good luck!

Cat

AileenGP Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:50pm
post #10 of 20

I try to level and torte before if I have time. If I do, I put a piece of plastic wrap in between the torted layers so they separate easily while still frozen/partially frozen. Then I wrap and freeze. If I'm in a rush, or if it's getting late and I'm really tired, I wrap and freeze directly and then just level when it's thawed.

I allow the cakes to thaw while still wrapped so any condensation that forms is on the outside of the wrap so the cake isn't sticky. I try to work with the cakes when they are still slightly frozen so they're easier to handle. I fill and crumbcoat at this point then put in the fridge so the buttercream firms up before covering in fondant (I use a BC that doesn't crust).

AileenGP Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:51pm
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by catlharper

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustGettinStarted

I'm so confused by all of the different advice. Some people say to thaw completely (covered) before doing any icing, other say not to. Some say to thaw the cake covered, some say to uncover. I'm guessing maybe there isn't a right way or a wrong way, just what someone prefers. Maybe? Anyone know differently?



Just about every piece of advice you will get here will be based on their own personal experience. For instance, I have found that icing a thawed cake can be harder and messer because I work with tender cakes like chiffon and not denser cakes like pound cake. I've also found that thawing them out inside the plastic wrap gives me a gooey top due to the moisture. What works for me is to fill and crumbcoat while still frozen but that's not necessarily what will work for you. It's trial and error. Pick whatever parts you think sound like they would work for you and give them a try.

Something else to remember as well. We are all located all over the world. For instance my humidity in Northern CA is about 25% but in AZ it's about 8% and in Alabama it could be 68%! Quite the different baking conditions and decorating conditions...and that's just those of us in the US! So some things will work for your part of the world that wouldn't work for me and some things will work for me that will not work for you. Trial and error. Good luck!

Cat




You totally read my mind.. especially on the humidity issue

JustGettinStarted Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 12:38am
post #12 of 20

I've torted a frozen cake before and one that wasn't frozen and I think it is so much easier to do frozen (especially if the cake is really moist) because it is hard to pull a layer of cake off without damaging it. I just wanted to make sure there wasn't a right way or wrong way to do it, especially a way that would hurt the flavor/moisture of the cake.

Also, if covering with fondant, does it matter if the cake is frozen at the time of covering?

catlharper Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 12:54am
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustGettinStarted


Also, if covering with fondant, does it matter if the cake is frozen at the time of covering?




It does matter quite a bit. A cold cake, as it comes to room temperature, expells air and gas. If it's crumbcoated as it comes to room temp the air/gas escapes thru the crumbcoat but if it has it's final layer of BC or Fondant then the air/gas is going to push thru that and it really can't...thus it will form a bubble in BC and pop causing a part of your BC to pretty much explode and fall off the cake...and if it's fondant covered then you will get a big bubble or bubbles where the air/gas is trying to escape out. You can "chill" your cake for a few minutes before covering with fondant because that just chills the crumbcoat, not the interior of the cake. You want a room temperature cake for the final coat of BC or Fondant. Also, as your cake comes to room temp it will settle...as much as a full inch! So if you cover it with fondant then your fondant may "puddle" at the base of your cake as your cake gets shorter and the fondant stays the same length. So fill, crumbcoat the frozen cake then allow it to settle for at least 3 hours outside of the fridge so it can settle and come to room temp before your final coating. The only time I've had issues with bubbles has been when I've rushed this process.

Cat

pag41989 Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 2:14pm
post #14 of 20

I tried to level a cake after freezing it and it was a COMPLETE disaster. I ended up having to rebake another 14 in layer. icon_sad.gif I now level my cakes before I freeze them. It was the first time I have ever frozen a cake so I suppose I am learning through trial and error. I also use a cake leveler instead of a knife. Not sure if that makes a difference.

ycknits Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 2:34pm
post #15 of 20

I've tried lots of ways because I frequently need to do my baking ahead of time. After trying many things that have only created more problems for me in the end, I now level the cakes, let them cool completely, fill, crumb coat, weight and let them sit for several hours. Then I trim the sides if necessary, crumb coat again, wrap with about 4 layers of saran wrap, put on a flat surface (cookie sheet, ceramic tile, larger cake pan, cooling rack - whatever I see first) and then freeze. After its frozen solidly, you can ditch the flat surface and just stack the wrapped/filled/leveled/crumb coated frozen cakes in the freeer. Then the night before I decorate, I take the cake out of the freezer, let it sit fully wrapped at room temperature overnight. The next day I cut off the saran wrap and let the cake sit exposed for maybe an hour before I start the decorating process. I check once more for any bulges or edged that need to be trimmed, then I decorate. Because I do charity baking, I have to decorate several cakes at the same time. This approach allows me to get all of the "engineering" part of the process out of way ahead of time and then just focus on the decorating process in a much more organized way.

catlharper Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 4:08pm
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ycknits

Then the night before I decorate, I take the cake out of the freezer, let it sit fully wrapped at room temperature overnight. The next day I cut off the saran wrap and let the cake sit exposed for maybe an hour before I start the decorating process..




If you crumbcoat it before freezing then let it thaw out inside the plastic wrap, doesn't a whole bunch of the crumbcoat come off with the plastic wrap when you cut it off?

Just curious how that works.

Cat

ycknits Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 9:27pm
post #17 of 20

The crumb coat crusts/dries pretty fast. Before I wrap it, I put a piece of parchment - a little larger than the top of the cake - on the top of the cake and let the edges hang over the cake.... this sort of tents out the saran wrap so that it doesn't touch the sides. The parchment always comes off easily when I open up the cake and generally doesn't even take off any of the crumb coat.

JustGettinStarted Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 10:59pm
post #18 of 20

Cat, I think I may like your style...I can't seem to level an unfrozen cake well at all! I have a Wilton Ultimate cake leveler and the cheaper one (with just the wire) and I've only used the Ultimate one once (a present to myself recently) and it came out VERY crooked. My husband even tried and it was awful, but I seem to do okay with a frozen cake.

My question to you Cat, is when you leave it at room temp after the crumb coat is it wrapped up or not?

To anyone: I worry about it drying out, too. I've seen different thicknesses of crumb coat and always wonder if I'm doing too much or too little. How thick is your crumb coat?

Thank you all so much! I can't believe how much I've learned on here. Unfortunately I don't have a lot of money to experiment with and I'm a perfectionist, so I have to really know what I'm doing. Thanks again!

catlharper Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 11:17pm
post #19 of 20

Yes, leveling in the pan is SO easy. As for leaving it out..yup, after I pull it out of the freezer I fill it, crumbcoat it and then let it sit for at least 3 hours...then I smooth it out again where the filling has bulged and cover it with the fondant or final BC layer. My crumbcoat is in the middle...just enough so that you can't see the cake thru the crumbcoat but not as thick as a final layer of BC would be.

Cat

JustGettinStarted Posted 6 Sep 2010 , 11:57pm
post #20 of 20

Thanks so much!

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