Things To Do When Freezing Cakes

Lounge By MissCakeCrazy Updated 7 Aug 2010 , 4:43pm by catlharper

MissCakeCrazy Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 12:29pm
post #1 of 16

I am going to bake a wedding cake to freeze. What is the best thing to protect it with? I was going to wrap it in foil. Also, when de-frosting, do you have to take it out of the foil completly or can it just defrost in the foil?

15 replies
leily Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 12:34pm
post #2 of 16

I wrap my cakes in two layers of plastic wrap and freeze.
DO NOT unwrap the cake while it thaws. You need the wrap to keep the moisture in the cake as it thaws or it will dry out.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 12:38pm
post #3 of 16

Is plastic wrap cling film (for the UK). I guessed that if I defrosted it in the wrap, it may go soggy? Does the cling film protect the base while you lift the cake, won't it come apart when fresh?

elliespartycake Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 12:41pm
post #4 of 16

I place th cake on a cardboard cake round and then wrap with plastic wrap (cling film). That way it is sturdy. By leaving the wrap on the cake when you thaw you keep the moisture in; otherwise your cake would dry out.

iamcookie Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 12:53pm
post #5 of 16

Yes, platic wrap would be cling film. I've gotten several sizes big storage bags from restaraunt supply store and they work great. I usually don't freeze cakes for more than 2-3 weeks. What I do is thaw unwrapped, because there's usually frozen moisure inside the bag, even when I double them. I do lay the (dried) bags or plastic on top as they thaw. But, I spread the frosting in between the layers while still frozen. The layers handle easily and if you don't get them on straight they can be easily moved without sticking and breaking. Works great, especially the big layers! But, make sure they are completely thawed and room temp before being frosted. Get them out (and frost in between) the night before.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 8:38pm
post #6 of 16

is it absolutley necessary to take them out of the cling film before thawing? The reason I am asking is that I will be using someone elses deep freeze which lives about 10 minutes away by car. If I am to thaw the cakes the night before could I instruct my relative just to take the cakes out the night before (and not do anything else) until I arrive the next morning?

iamcookie Posted 5 Aug 2010 , 10:55pm
post #7 of 16

I think if you wrap it twice it should be fine. The cling wrap will be right on the cake. Bags don't fit close so that's probably why I get frost on the inside of the bag. I have also put the icing in the middle of the layers and froze them that way, then that step is done! I still freeze the bigger layers first then spread the frosting and stick them back in the freezer, just because they're so much easier to handle. Good luck!

microbiology1 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:48am
post #8 of 16

I defrost mine with the plastic wrap/cling and tin foil left on and I don't have any problems. Just make sure they lay the cake flat and don't stack the layers on top of each other while they're defrosting.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 11:34am
post #9 of 16

The wedding is on 15th October but as I am going on holiday for 2 weeks at the end of september I thought I'd start early. Do you think it was too early to bake the cake and freeze today? I wanted to take away the stress.

microbiology1 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 12:48pm
post #10 of 16

Yes. But I seem to really be able to pick up the flavor of freezer more than other people. I would wait until September to do it. Or if you're returning in early October do it then.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 2:33pm
post #11 of 16

In my last post I had already put the cake in the oven. Should I worry about the taste in October?

microbiology1 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 7:07pm
post #12 of 16

I personally have never frozen a cake for that long. Someone else can probably answer that better.

iamcookie Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:29am
post #13 of 16

I usually don't freeze for more that a month, but according to most cookbooks and guides, cake can freeze up to 3 months. Just wrap very good and airtight.

catlharper Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:47am
post #14 of 16

I freeze every cake I do and this is what I do: bake, level in pan, cool on wire rack then torte. Wrap each layer in press and seal wrap then wrap the entire tier in press and seal (don't like foil, it leaves dents). Then when I'm ready to use the cake I take them out of the freezer, unwrap, fill and crumbcoat and let settle for at least 3 hours. This allows any air/gas to escape as well as any filling to sploosh out while the cake comes up to room temp. Then I resmooth out my crumbcoat and cover with fondant.

My own personal preference is to fill/crumbcoat while frozen to keep the moisture crystals inside the cake while it thaws. I found that if I let the cake thaw first not only were the layers harder to deal with but the top/edges were a bit soggy.

HTH. Cat

kansaslaura Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 1:18pm
post #15 of 16

I've always allowed them to thaw inside the plastic wrap. Thinik of it this way--you wouldn't take bread out of the freezer, then lay it out unwrapped to thaw. Those crystals are moisture from inside the cake, and need to go back inside as the cake thaws.

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The wedding is on 15th October but as I am going on holiday for 2 weeks at the end of september I thought I'd start early. Do you think it was too early to bake the cake and freeze today? I wanted to take away the stress.




That would be fine. I'd double wrap in plastic, freeze, take out and wrap in foil. I too don't like the dents foil will put into a cake, but freezing first pretty much elminates them.

catlharper Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 4:43pm
post #16 of 16

"I've always allowed them to thaw inside the plastic wrap. Thinik of it this way--you wouldn't take bread out of the freezer, then lay it out unwrapped to thaw. Those crystals are moisture from inside the cake, and need to go back inside as the cake thaws."


This is why I fill and crumbcoat it right away. While frozen I can manipulate the layers easier as well as crumbcoat easier than when they are thawed out. After I crumbcoat the icing traps in the moisture but not the escaping gas/air. This allows me to work with a stable cake but end up serving a very moist one.

As I said, this is my method and anyone looking for a new method should try them out to see what works best for THEM....it may not necessarily be mine or someone elses but a combo of techniques. The best we can do on here is give tips about what has worked or is working for us personally.

Now...also another point to make. I live in No. California...for those living in the South or in another country the ingredents used and the climate/environment is totally different so pleasekeep this in mind when trying new techniques out.

Cat

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