But What About The Taste...

Decorating By KayMc Updated 17 Jul 2010 , 6:10pm by saberger

KayMc Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 4:22pm
post #1 of 9

I am purchasing and LOVING Sharon Zambito (Sugar Shack)'s instructional DVD's. I'm currently watching the one on flawless fondant. My question is this: Sharon mentions that she uses a THIN coating of bc for her crumb coat, and then the fondant on top. Doesn't that result in a cake without a lot of good taste? Seems it would be mostly the cake and the fondant to eat. I'd love to hear from you fondant experts, about the taste of this. I have a cake in the oven to do my first fondant cake (I admit it, I've been intimidated, but I decided it's time to jump in the deep water). To prevent this, I'm considering doing a fairly thick amount of bc filling with a good stiff dam, covering the cake in white chocolate ganache, and then putting MFF on top of that. Since I do giveaway cakes at this point, I hate the added expense of the ganache, but I'm afraid of just a think layer of bc and fondant. Am I wrong?

8 replies
yummy Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 4:45pm
post #2 of 9

I don't have that dvd but you can just use ganache under the fondant.

Marianna46 Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 4:55pm
post #3 of 9

I never use bc under my fondant (too hot and humid where I live - the fondant slides off the cake even with all-shortening buttercream). I always use ganache. Sometimes I fill with the ganache and sometimes I fill with buttercream and fruit filling (the kind sold in a sleeve). The cakes are always delicious - they're very good anyway, because I use some really tasty recipes (most of which are on here), but the ganache makes them really yummy!

brincess_b Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 5:08pm
post #4 of 9

you need to learn what works for you. what works for sharon is a thin layer. but maybe you can work with a thicker layer - essentially the 'problem' with that is its easier to smoosh ur fondant, and if its hot, youw ill get more problems, but you can work around that.
maybe get to grips with a thinner layer, then just whack it on!
and of coure, you might like thick bc, but the people you make cakes for might actually not, so its swings and roundabout anyway.
xx

regymusic Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 5:10pm
post #5 of 9

I have used both bc and whipped ganache beneath my fondant. No matter what, I always have at least 1/4 inch of undercoating. The taste of fondant when rolled thinly, benefits from the flavoring in the layer beneath. So I would agree with your accessment and wanting more than just a crumb coat foundation.

mamawrobin Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 5:22pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

I am purchasing and LOVING Sharon Zambito (Sugar Shack)'s instructional DVD's. I'm currently watching the one on flawless fondant. My question is this: Sharon mentions that she uses a THIN coating of bc for her crumb coat, and then the fondant on top. Doesn't that result in a cake without a lot of good taste? Seems it would be mostly the cake and the fondant to eat. I'd love to hear from you fondant experts, about the taste of this. I have a cake in the oven to do my first fondant cake (I admit it, I've been intimidated, but I decided it's time to jump in the deep water). To prevent this, I'm considering doing a fairly thick amount of bc filling with a good stiff dam, covering the cake in white chocolate ganache, and then putting MFF on top of that. Since I do giveaway cakes at this point, I hate the added expense of the ganache, but I'm afraid of just a think layer of bc and fondant. Am I wrong?




You're talking about the "great" Sharon Zambito I would hardly think she produces a cake "without a lot of good taste?" icon_eek.gif
..anyway..you did say that this is "your first fondant cake". You really need to heed her advice on the crumbcoat. You said that you are "considering doing a fairly thick amount of bc filling"...that is really plenty with a crumbcoat for a cake to taste plenty good. People love my fondant and I rarely ever see someone NOT eat it. I always do a crumbcoat of bc and I never have any complaints. You can add more bc than a "crumbcoat" but your fondant will not have the sharp edges as it will with just a crumbcoat.
Her DVD is informative on how to get the best results when covering a cake with fondant and a crumbcoat of bc will produce the absolute best results. If you could get the nice sharp edges with a regular coat of bc she wouldn't instruct to use just the crumbcoat.

If it isn't that important to you to have the sharp clean edges to your cake then you can add more bc than a "thin crumbcoat". I too have added more than a crumbcoat under fondant..you just don't get the best results. Like I said her DVD is informative on how to get the best results.

Good luck with your cake. I hope that you have great results with your "first fondant cake". I was afraid of it the first time I used it but would hate to do without it now. It's my favorite medium for decorating cakes.

Price Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 5:38pm
post #7 of 9

From what I've read, there are many decorators who use a thin layer of bc under their fondant. If you use a nice amount of filling that should be more than enough with the cake. Think about it. If you cut a slice of cake 1x2 or 1x3, how much bc icing is really on the top anyway? I've found alot of men don't really like too much icing on their cake. I recently sent a cake to work with my husband for a retirement, and the guy said he really likes my cakes because I don't use too much icing!

Sharon's DVD's are some of the best! I have watched them more than once and taken alot of tips from them. I can definitely see an improvement in my cakes by following her advice!

mamawrobin Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 5:46pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Price

From what I've read, there are many decorators who use a thin layer of bc under their fondant. If you use a nice amount of filling that should be more than enough with the cake. Think about it. If you cut a slice of cake 1x2 or 1x3, how much bc icing is really on the top anyway? I've found alot of men don't really like too much icing on their cake. I recently sent a cake to work with my husband for a retirement, and the guy said he really likes my cakes because I don't use too much icing!

Sharon's DVD's are some of the best! I have watched them more than once and taken alot of tips from them. I can definitely see an improvement in my cakes by following her advice!




I said the same as you about using extra "filling"...that's plenty enough with a thin crumbcoat. thumbs_up.gif Afterall...Sharon has sold more cakes that I probably ever will and since she's been on the "Ultimate Cakeoff" and is as successful as she is..I'M not going to second guess her icon_wink.gif Besides..LOOK at HER cakes thumbs_up.gif ...If I could only be THAT good.

saberger Posted 17 Jul 2010 , 6:10pm
post #9 of 9

I definitely concur that you should try to find what works best for you. When I use too much icing under the BC I find that it tends to smoosh down at the bottom and I have a leakage. However, the KEY thing is to make sure that it is smooth! If you can use more than a crumbcoat, then just make sure that there aren't any big lumps or extra globs of BC, because it WILL make the fondant bump and mushy - which isn't good if you want to have room to maneuver your fondant.

I have watched most of Sugarshack DVDs and they ARE awesome - but it isn't gospel, so, again, find YOUR way. What might be a good idea is to start with her method first and then experiment from there. This way, you know of a rather foolproof way and what to expect in your results. Good luck!!! And have patience!!

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