Newbie, Why Did My Cake Bubble

Decorating By KrazyKakesNJ Updated 15 Jul 2010 , 8:35pm by KrazyKakesNJ

KrazyKakesNJ Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:05pm
post #1 of 9

Hi I am a newbie, icon_cry.gif

I worked really hard on this cake, but after 3 hours in the heat of the day (around 87 degrees) the 2nd tier started to bubble on the side. the top and 2nd tiers where completely fine.

Have no clue why that happened, thank heavens that I was invited to the party as well. To everyone else it looked fine but I say that huge bubble and my heart sank.

From experience can anyone help me try to figure out why it did that?
Thank you!!!! icon_redface.gif
LL

8 replies
catlharper Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:11pm
post #2 of 9

Gas bubbles can form for a few reasons. The most common is covering a cold cake or a cake that has not had a chance to settle. I freeze all of my cakes so when I take them out of the fridge I fill, crumbcoat and then let them come to room temp and settle for at least 3 hours or longer. Many here let them settle overnight and I do that when I can. As your cake comes up to room temp and settles the gas bubbles or air bubbles in the cake and pockets in the filling try to escape. They can do so thru the crumbcoat layer but when they meet that final coating of buttercream or fondant they just push and push till they can escape. With buttercream this will cause a "blow out"..one section of the buttercream that will push out and fall off the cake! With fondant it causes the huge bubble. I watch my cakes very closely the first two hours after covering with fondant for any forming bubbles so I can smooth them down the minute they start to form. This really only happens for me when I rush the coming to temp/settling time table but I watch every cake anyways. If you catch them as they are forming you can just press the fondant back into place but if you don't then the best you can do is pop it with a needle and smooth as best as you can..those spot are perfect for a"design element" such as a flower! LOL! YOur cake is adorable! Good Job!

Cat

carmijok Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 6:22pm
post #3 of 9

You don't even have to smooth the bubble once you pop it. It will usually settle on it's own and you won't be able to tell where it was. Sometimes trying to smooth after pricking the bubble will cause more stretching. just let it set for a while and see how it does first. icon_smile.gif

mamawrobin Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 7:13pm
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

You don't even have to smooth the bubble once you pop it. It will usually settle on it's own and you won't be able to tell where it was. Sometimes trying to smooth after pricking the bubble will cause more stretching. just let it set for a while and see how it does first. icon_smile.gif




I agree. I rarely have this happen but if I do..I just stick it with a pin and it will "fix" itself. The less that I have to touch a finished cake the better. thumbs_up.gif

bakingpw Posted 11 Jul 2010 , 9:11pm
post #5 of 9

Sorry for the bubble, but you did an amazing job! It's so cute! I agree, next time, just "pop" the bubble.

theonlynameleft Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 6:06am
post #6 of 9

icon_razz.gificon_eek.gif Oh my goodness, this cake is amazing! I am a newbie and I would love if I had anything this amazing in my photos!!!!

KrazyKakesNJ Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 3:15pm
post #7 of 9

Thank you so much for the compliments!!! The cake actually had a blow out on the side....Thank you for the help, totally appreciate it.

I usually stick my cakes in the fridge after I am done decorating them until its time to deliver them. Since its several ours before I have to deliver them or they where done the night before when I have alot of cake for that week. Is this a no no?

catlharper Posted 13 Jul 2010 , 6:24pm
post #8 of 9

I would keep it out on the counter for about 2 hours at least to watch for bubbles. Actually with fondant covered cakes (unless the filling is perishable) it's completely not necessary to refridgerate them. Now if your house is 85 degrees then I'd consider it but otherwise, if you have A/C or it's winter then you don't have to worry about it. Just put the cake in a cake box if you can and leave it on the counter or work table.

Cat

KrazyKakesNJ Posted 15 Jul 2010 , 8:35pm
post #9 of 9

Thank you so much for all your help! I really do appreciate it. icon_smile.gif

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