No Show Again

Business By karateka Updated 4 Jul 2010 , 5:20am by CoutureCake

karateka Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:03pm
post #1 of 20

Here it is 2pm. The lady I was supposed to have a tasting with is not here. I called and left a message to confirm yesterday. I did this on a special day because of the holiday.

I'm going to all paid tastings. Hells bells, I'm not doing any business anyway. Here I sit in my red chef's coat with all the stuff plated and the house FLAWLESS...

Thanks for letting me vent.

19 replies
leah_s Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:10pm
post #2 of 20

It's happened to all of us. People have NO manners any more.

Ladiesofthehouse Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:15pm
post #3 of 20

I'm so sorry this happened--I cannot believe how rude people can be.

I charge $20.00 for tastings and if they book with me on that day the $20.00 charge is refunded from their cake price.

Seems to weed out the riff-raff.

kger Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:23pm
post #4 of 20

I'll bet your red chef's coat is awesome!

CristyInMiami Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:24pm
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

It's happened to all of us. People have NO manners any more.




Yes, that is sadly the truth.

I learned my lesson to recieve deposits just like this- the hard way!

I would charge tastings too.

I think next time she comes, tell her that she missed the tasting and thats its $XX.XX.

Katiebelle74 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:35pm
post #6 of 20

I have sat through many no shows. I like the idea of charging 20.00 and then applying it toward the cake order if they book that day. Although all the other bakeries in my area do free tastings. I am going to have to think up a creative solution to the no-show no-call problem as well. It really stinks especially when they want a tasting in the evening and you decline plans with friends and family in order to be available to serve them and they don't even show up!

elvisb Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:42pm
post #7 of 20

I don't have problems with no shows for consultations, but I do have people who forget they have to meet me at the reception hall to unlock the doors. Then spend 30 minutes on the phone trying to track someone down with the car running so the cake doesn't melt. Also very frustrating. But I do like the idea of charging for the tasting then applying it as a payment if they book. Good thinking!

karateka Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:47pm
post #8 of 20

I just changed my website to read that all tastings are $20, paid in advance, credited if you book with me, accept checks 2 weeks in advance, cash or credit up to 3 days before. No payment, no tasting.

NO REFUNDS IF NOT GIVEN 24 HR NOTICE.

No....I didn't cap it. But I felt like it. (I did, however, highlight it in red.)

SO tired of this crap. I do quality work, but nobody would ever know it. You'd think I was the worst baker in town with this rate of no shows. Criminy.

(Can you tell I'm still a bit steamed?)

MariaK38 Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 6:54pm
post #9 of 20

I hear you, karateka! I was just down in your neck of the woods (the Starbucks by Ikea) a couple of weeks ago for a tasting (edible favors). I called and confirmed with the client (talked to her live) the day before, and she didn't show up the next day.
I emailed her when I got home and she writes back, "oh sorry, I forgot." REALLY?!... for goodness sake, just tell the truth! I'd rather be cancelled on before I make the 45 minute drive down there! I don't normally drive that long for a tasting, but I was going to Ikea that day, anyway, so all wasn't totally lost, but it killed me how little she valued my time.
I'm seriously thinking of going the paid tasting route (pay before I make the trip!) mentioned above. Maybe that will show people I mean business!
Anyway, I feel for you, and hope things pick up for you!

Maria

dozenredroses Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 7:03pm
post #10 of 20

I do not think that the number of no shows you are experiencing reflects on the clients opinion of the quality of work you do. I think it reflects on the quality or consideration of the client. Do not take it personally. Sorry you have so many no shows. {{HUGS}}

tracycakes Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 7:32pm
post #11 of 20

I'm so sorry this happened. I just can't believe that just don't show up. What is WRONG with people.

indydebi Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 8:44pm
post #12 of 20

Some things to factor is the weather and the time of day.

In the winter, later appointments tend to be kept because people need to wait for the snow plows to get thru the roads and in the winter we are just not in the mood to jump up and get out the door when it's cold and windy and snowy. So I have found that in the winter, noon or afternoon appointments work better.

In the summer, a 2:00 appointment cuts right into the middle of a GORGEOUS summer day and whatever I'm doing, I probably don't want to stop doing it to run over to an appointment .... any appointment. So I have found that in the summer, morning appointments work better than afternoon appointments. It's like "Get the work out of the way and we have the whole rest of the day to lay by the pool" type of thinkingl.

So not only do we have to be good bakers, and decorators, and salesmen .... we also have to be a little bit of psychologist and know how people think! thumbs_up.gif

karateka Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 8:51pm
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Some things to factor is the weather and the time of day.

In the winter, later appointments tend to be kept because people need to wait for the snow plows to get thru the roads and in the winter we are just not in the mood to jump up and get out the door when it's cold and windy and snowy. So I have found that in the winter, noon or afternoon appointments work better.

In the summer, a 2:00 appointment cuts right into the middle of a GORGEOUS summer day and whatever I'm doing, I probably don't want to stop doing it to run over to an appointment .... any appointment. So I have found that in the summer, morning appointments work better than afternoon appointments. It's like "Get the work out of the way and we have the whole rest of the day to lay by the pool" type of thinkingl.

So not only do we have to be good bakers, and decorators, and salesmen .... we also have to be a little bit of psychologist and know how people think! thumbs_up.gif




Geez. This is good to know. But for crying out loud....why can't she just say "That won't work for me, how about earlier?????" I already changed the date to accommodate the fact that my usu tasting day was on a holiday, and she didn't want Sundays, either. I have a regular Saturday commitment at 10:30 am, so morning would have been dicey.

costumeczar Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 10:42pm
post #14 of 20

Well, I'm not too concerned about the time of day...If I can get up and get to the consult area then they can too! If it's too snowy that roads are closed off everything would have to be rescheduled anyway, and I'll bet they still get to work on time on a cold morning. If people can show up for work on a cold or a nice day then they can $&%*&^ well show up for an appt that they confirmed the day before!

indydebi Posted 3 Jul 2010 , 10:47pm
post #15 of 20

But in their mind, getting to work on a Tuesday is mandatory. Getting to cake tasting is optional and can be rescheduled at their convenience! Right or wrong, it's the psychy behind it.

And honestly, I never wanted to stop in the middle of MY pretty summer afternoon to do a tasting either! So it worked out better for all of us to do them in the morning. icon_wink.gif

karateka Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 12:47am
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kger

I'll bet your red chef's coat is awesome!




Indeed it is! icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 1:11am
post #17 of 20

I have a Master's Degree in psychology, and there's psychology behind a lot of things, but if someone confirms an appointment and then just doesn't come, that's not psychology, it's just rude. It shouldn't have to be our jobs to decipher the tiny workings of someone else's brain when we schedule tasting appointments, for pete's sake. If they say that they can make a certain time then they should make it.

kellertur Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 2:47am
post #18 of 20

I'm one to usually give people the benefit of the doubt, but I think no-shows (without a REALLY good reason) are rude/inconsiderate and time wasters. I send an email reminder a few days before, then I charge them if they are a no-show. It costs me money and I'm not working for free. icon_wink.gif My tastings are generally "free", but I make exceptions for people who have no respect for my time...and I mention a "no show" charge in my email to confirm.

Btrfly578 Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 3:36am
post #19 of 20

I love reading these posts. Gives me a lot of "GREAT" ideas.

CoutureCake Posted 4 Jul 2010 , 5:20am
post #20 of 20

There is no better way to say it than this, it's a double-bind when doing the charge for tastings vs. not charging... On one hand it cuts down on the frustration because of idiots who can't figure out that a FREE tasting isn't, and those who refuse to pay for samples which weeds out a lot of potential customers...

I found that the no-shows came in streaks... I like the statement "Please help keep our tastings free of charge, if you cannot make it, please call at least 24 hours in advance"... Or "First tasting is free, if you cancel with less than 24 hours notice, there is a $30 rescheduling fee which will be refunded upon booking"...

One other thought is to limit when you will do tastings but I'd truly be hesitent to charge for them because it really is going to limit down your potential customer pool even more. If youl limit your tastings to when you've got cake that you can just make some cuppies up from leftover batter, etc, then you're golden. You really in the end lose more potential customers with the charge than you will lose with the cost of tastings. Alas, it's up to you and what will work for your business model.

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