Couple Questions

Decorating By abismumma Updated 2 Jul 2010 , 12:05am by mamawrobin

abismumma Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:20pm
post #1 of 10

First off is how easy is it to freeze cakes then thaw them to frost?

Second is when doing tiers what do you do for support. Do you just use cardboard in between tiers.

9 replies
Ruth0209 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:29pm
post #2 of 10

From your heading, I thought you were asking questions about couples.

I never freeze my cakes, but a lot of people do. Search for the topic in the cake decorating forum and you'll find all kinds of information. Same with your second question. Both of these topics have been commented on extensively on this site.

newmansmom2004 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:35pm
post #3 of 10

I freeze cakes all the time. Just bake, then double wrap in aluminum foil so it doesn't get freezer burned. When it's time to use them, take them out and open the foil a bit so the air will help rid them of any condensation as they come to room temp. Level, tort and ice.

If you're doing a multi-tiered cake you need some sort of internal support in the cake tiers, i.e. plastic or wooden (food safe) dowels, bubble straws, etc. Cut them to fit the height of each tier and insert. Each tier should have a cardboard cake round on the bottom to sit on top of the supports in the tier below.

Karen421 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:47pm
post #4 of 10

Yes you can freeze cakes. Bake let them cool for about 10 minutes, turn them out (Doug has a great way to do it - but I can't find where he posted it) double wrap in plastic then foil - stick in freeze. When you take them out make sure you thaw them wrapped.

Use dowels, bubble tea straws, or the SPS under your tiers. I like bubble tea straws if I am stacking straight up with a dowel going top to bottom or the SPS if I am doing tiers (like a wedding cake) HTH

Also try this thread:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-683219-freezing.html

mayo2222 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:51pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen421

Yes you can freeze cakes. Bake let them cool for about 10 minutes, turn them out (Doug has a great way to do it - but I can't find where he posted it) double wrap in plastic then foil - stick in freeze. When you take them out make sure you thaw them wrapped.

Use dowels, bubble tea straws, or the SPS under your tiers. I like bubble tea straws if I am stacking straight up with a dowel going top to bottom or the SPS if I am doing tiers (like a wedding cake) HTH

Also try this thread:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-683219-freezing.html




I believe Doug's method is to cover the cakes in large enough pieces to wrap them in and then when the piece is laying flat across the cake take the cake pan and push plastic/foil over cake

Marianna46 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:58pm
post #6 of 10

Definitely defrost while still wrapped. Otherwise, the condensation gets on the cake, not the wrapping. When doing tiers, you need a base the exact size of each tier (I use the corrugated cardboard cake rounds or cut them to shape if the cake isn't round). If you don't have that, the dowels or straws in the next tier down have nothing to support and your cake will fall apart! If you can get hold of the SPS suppports, that's even better.

ChRiStY_71 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 8:58pm
post #7 of 10

Off topic...Mayo: I love your Avatar! thumbs_up.gif

ElmwoodHero Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 9:09pm
post #8 of 10

my instructor told me that you don't need to support a cake if you are delivering it unassembled. if you deliver it assembled then you need to place a couple dowel rods completely through the cake. as for a cake-board- I use a piece of plywood lined with a couple layers of tin foil. works great! reusable too

Karen421 Posted 1 Jul 2010 , 9:16pm
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElmwoodHero

my instructor told me that you don't need to support a cake if you are delivering it unassembled. if you deliver it assembled then you need to place a couple dowel rods completely through the cake. as for a cake-board- I use a piece of plywood lined with a couple layers of tin foil. works great! reusable too




A tier cake, your instructor told you - you don't need to support it? What about when you set it up??

mamawrobin Posted 2 Jul 2010 , 12:05am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen421

Quote:
Originally Posted by ElmwoodHero

my instructor told me that you don't need to support a cake if you are delivering it unassembled. if you deliver it assembled then you need to place a couple dowel rods completely through the cake. as for a cake-board- I use a piece of plywood lined with a couple layers of tin foil. works great! reusable too



A tier cake, your instructor told you - you don't need to support it? What about when you set it up??




What "instructor" told you this? I'm confused. If you're talking about a tiered cake..then you need supports whether you're delivering it assembled or not. When you put the cake together it needs to have supports in them. Why would you wait until you're at the venue to cut dowels/straws icon_lol.gif that makes absolutely no sense to me. icon_confused.gif Unless it's over a three tiered cake I always deliver fully assembled.

To the op...I use straws and cardboard cake circles for my support system.

As far as freezing cakes....wrap twice in plastic wrap to freeze. Leave wrapped until completely thawed to prevent condensation from forming on your cake. Nothing "hard" about it.

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