Cake Boss Cakes And Filling, Do They Bulge?

Decorating By DALIG Updated 24 Jul 2010 , 1:52am by RanaPeach

DALIG Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 11:58pm
post #1 of 18

I think we all have seen cake boss, and so i am wondering, we all do tons of things so that we dont get does bulges, the thick icing, the weight on the cake, letting it rest, but on cake boss i ve never seen them do a border before filling or saying any thing about thick icing. what do u all think about it, is there something else missing that we dont know?

17 replies
Kitagrl Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 12:17am
post #2 of 18

I dunno...I don't weight my cakes, and if I'm just using ganache or buttercream, I don't dam my fillings either (just jam or other softer fillings, and most professionals do dam the fillings). I also only let my cakes "rest" as long as they take to set up in the fridge...I don't really do it purposely to "rest" and settle.

So far I don't get too much trouble with bulging, I always figured it was because my fillings and/or icing dam always stays firm enough so that the filling does not start pushing out. I also do not necessarily use "thick" icing, I just put it on until it goes to the edge of the same sized cake board to make sure I'm icing it evenly around.

sweettooth622 Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:04am
post #3 of 18

Hmmm, I watch Cake Boss alot and I've seen them put a dam on before filling most all of their cakes.
I just discovered recently that the frosting for the dam should be a stiffer frosting than you use as filling or for the outside of the cake itself. Makes sense, although, I tried this on my last cake and I guess I didn't get it stiff enough because I still noticed a line through my fondant the next morning. Guess I'm still learning icon_smile.gif

Kitagrl Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:07am
post #4 of 18

Are you guys covering with fondant right after you ice the cake?

I do let my iced cake chill up really well before covering in fondant.

mbark Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:22am
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Are you guys covering with fondant right after you ice the cake?

I do let my iced cake chill up really well before covering in fondant.




ok Kita, question for you- once you take out your cake, how do you get your bc tacky again so the fondant sticks? I've tried both water & melted apricot jelly and don't like them as much as just covering the cake once it's iced in bc.

Kitagrl Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:26am
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbark

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Are you guys covering with fondant right after you ice the cake?

I do let my iced cake chill up really well before covering in fondant.



ok Kita, question for you- once you take out your cake, how do you get your bc tacky again so the fondant sticks? I've tried both water & melted apricot jelly and don't like them as much as just covering the cake once it's iced in bc.




If its crusting buttercream I do a VERY fine small mist of water. If its noncrusting buttercream, than nothing.

The warmth of your hands should also help the fondant to stick as well.

msulli10 Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:27am
post #7 of 18

I've used piping gel - just a very light coating on the buttercream before putting on the fondant.

cafecooley Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:32am
post #8 of 18

I just watched an episode of Ultimate Cake Off and one of the competing decorators used a spray bottle filled with "grain alcohol" to spritz her buttercream cake and she specifically said it was to get the bc tacky so the fondant would stick. I have used vodka on a couple of occasions but I brushed it on. I will be definately try the spray bottle method next time.HTH

cafecooley Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:32am
post #9 of 18

I just watched an episode of Ultimate Cake Off and one of the competing decorators used a spray bottle filled with "grain alcohol" to spritz her buttercream cake and she specifically said it was to get the bc tacky so the fondant would stick. I have used vodka on a couple of occasions but I brushed it on. I will be definately try the spray bottle method next time.HTH

mbark Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 1:44am
post #10 of 18

ok great, thanks. I was actually thinking a spray bottle would probably work great but didn't have one. before I went to use the apricot spread, you should have seen me smooth that fondant over & over again onto the crusting bc, it wouldn't stick to save its life!

BlakesCakes Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 3:29am
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by cafecooley

I just watched an episode of Ultimate Cake Off and one of the competing decorators used a spray bottle filled with "grain alcohol" to spritz her buttercream cake and she specifically said it was to get the bc tacky so the fondant would stick. I have used vodka on a couple of occasions but I brushed it on. I will be definately try the spray bottle method next time.HTH




You know, I saw that too, and I literally gagged. There is nothing as bitter as grain alcohol or vodka icon_eek.gif Since it's not exposed to the air, the alcohol can't really evaporate, so I envision it trapped between the buttercream and the fondant......................

I mist my buttercream with water and then go over it lightly with a pastry brush before applying the fondant.

Rae

emily42897 Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:13pm
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Quote:

I just watched an episode of Ultimate Cake Off and one of the competing decorators used a spray bottle filled with "grain alcohol" to spritz her buttercream cake and she specifically said it was to get the bc tacky so the fondant would stick. I have used vodka on a couple of occasions but I brushed it on. I will be definately try the spray bottle method next time.




They don't eat these cakes, amazingly enough. The event they take the cakes too serves sheet cakes. That's probably why they get away with it. All I can think is what a waste of cake. But they are too old too serve at this point.

marcx Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 7:29pm
post #13 of 18

I've watched numerous episodes of cake boss and everytime, I've seen him pipe a dam around the edges of the cake. This is especially important for Carlo's because from what I understand, they pride themselves in using fresh fruit in their fillings, so with a dam, it helps keep the air out and seals in the filling and its freshness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaLlapitan622

I just discovered recently that the frosting for the dam should be a stiffer frosting than you use as filling or for the outside of the cake itself. Makes sense, although, I tried this on my last cake and I guess I didn't get it stiff enough because I still noticed a line through my fondant the next morning. Guess I'm still learning icon_smile.gif




One word: indydebi.

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing

Her BC is so kickass, it's ridiculous. Perfect for crusting and a damn good dam for any type of filling. icon_biggrin.gif

After you torte and fill the cake, make sure to let it rest in room temperature so the cake settles. Then, after a few hours, scrape off the bulging BC , lay on more buttercream, smooth and cool, then cover that sucker up with fondant. You can't have a good structure without a solid foundation, so take as much time as needed to do it right!

Kiddiekakes Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 8:20pm
post #14 of 18

I often wonder this too..They show them putting all this ganache and cut strawberries etc on all at once and the crumbcoating and covering in fondant.I would be scared that all that stuff would leak out..Then again he uses sponge cakes so maybe it absorbs all the liquid..I also notice he pretty much decorates and then delivers right away or so it seems so maybe it doesn't have time to get mushy or buldge.

emily42897 Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 8:34pm
post #15 of 18

I am quite sure he chills them quite awhile before he covers them in fondant. I have heard him specifically say that when he talks about the steps he took in the process.

tiggy2 Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 8:37pm
post #16 of 18

It's Tv, there's a lot of editing. Who knows how much time actually lapses before the fondant is added.

emily42897 Posted 23 Jul 2010 , 8:50pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Quote:

It's Tv, there's a lot of editing. Who knows how much time actually lapses before the fondant is added.




Exactly! I bet it's hours.

RanaPeach Posted 24 Jul 2010 , 1:52am
post #18 of 18

I watch the show every week, and on numerous occasions have seen them put a dam of icing, plus I agree about editing. There is no telling what part of the decorating process ends up on the cutting room floor.

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