Ganache Newbie Needs Help!!

Decorating By awestervelt Updated 29 Jun 2010 , 9:00pm by fishabel

awestervelt Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 2:53pm
post #1 of 17

I have just started trying to use chocolate ganache and I was wondering what the trick was. How do you get it to lay so smooth on your cake. When I tried it you could still see the bumps on the cake underneath. I also tried it with the ganache a little bit warmer and it still didn't turn out real smooth. icon_cry.gif I must be doing something wrong. I would love it if someone would enlighten me!! icon_lol.gif Thanks

16 replies
mamawrobin Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 3:03pm
post #2 of 17

First of all I make my ganache using 2:1 ratio (12 ounces semi-sweet chocolate to 1 cup heavy whipping cream) I let mine set at room temperature for 24 hours after making to allow it to thicken. When I spread it on my cake it's about the consistency of peanut butter. After I finish covering my cake, I use the hot knife method (youtube video tutorials can show you how to do this) and smooth my ganache. It looks as smooth as fondant when I'm done. thumbs_up.gif

awestervelt Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 3:11pm
post #3 of 17

What do you type to find the hot knife method? Everything I pulled up had nothing to do with cake.

joaaaann Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 3:23pm
post #4 of 17

I have done many 'poured ganache' cakes. Basically, once you have mixed your ganache and find there are bits of chocolate not quite melted, warm it in the microwave for 30 second intervals till is all lump free. Then you want to wait about 5-10 mins so the ganache has thickened up slightly. Consistency would be like honey. It gives a thicker, more forgiving coat if more thick than thin. Pour and smooth it with your spatula as it spreads over the top and smooth over the sides as it flows over the edges. HTH icon_biggrin.gif

carmijok Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 3:48pm
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by awestervelt

What do you type to find the hot knife method? Everything I pulled up had nothing to do with cake.




The hot knife method is basically heating your knife in boiling water (or very very hot water), wiping it dry and then running it around your cake to heat and smooth the icing...or ganache.

mamawrobin Posted 26 Jun 2010 , 3:50pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by joaaaann

I have done many 'poured ganache' cakes. Basically, once you have mixed your ganache and find there are bits of chocolate not quite melted, warm it in the microwave for 30 second intervals till is all lump free. Then you want to wait about 5-10 mins so the ganache has thickened up slightly. Consistency would be like honey. It gives a thicker, more forgiving coat if more thick than thin. Pour and smooth it with your spatula as it spreads over the top and smooth over the sides as it flows over the edges. HTH icon_biggrin.gif




I'm not sure she's talking about "poured" ganache. I don't pour mine on but rather use it under fondant so I spread it on like icing.

To the op...before you get WRONG information are you trying to ice your cake with ganache (You have nothing between your cake and the ganache that you're putting on your cake?) are you going to be covering with fondant?

The information I gave you is for all of the above....the information that joaaaan gave you is for "poured ganache" One that most people pour over an iced cake.

So which one are your trying to do? thumbs_up.gif

The "hot knife" method... dip long spatula into boiling water and wipe off the blade and run it across your cake....keep repeating this set until you've smoothed the entire cake. Just make sure to completely wipe your blade dry because you don't want water on your cake. I'll try to find the link for the tutorial for you.

awestervelt Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 3:13pm
post #7 of 17

I want the ganache to be the only thing on the cake. I'm going to have to keep at it!!

meharding Posted 27 Jun 2010 , 3:50pm
post #8 of 17

I am some what confused about the 2:1 ratio. 12 ounces of chocolate = 12 ounces by weight. 1 cup of heavy whipping cream = 8 fluid ounces. Which would be a 3:2 ratio.

Does 1 cup of heavy whipping cream weigh 6 ounces? Which would then make it a 2:1 ratio.

Is the 2:1 ratio

Chocolate:cream = ounces by weight:fluid ounces

or

Chocolate:cream = weight by ounces:weight by ounces?

Sorry for the confusion. I feel like I must be missing something...lol.

bmoser24 Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 5:57am
post #9 of 17

Here is a thread on this, and it is long but worth the read...and the measurements go by weight. there us a turitorial link on pg.28.
I ganashe my cakes before fondant as well and my ganashe has not come out as smooth as I would like, even using hot knife method. Two things I believe i'm doing wrong...1. Quality of chocolate...i'm using chips. 2. Not using enough, not thick enough. Oh yeah....and...I have been doing the top first, next time i'm going to do sides first so i'm not messing with the top too much.
Practice and learn...lol, but I love the finished look, esp on corners.
Blessings http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-633264-.html

fishabel Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 10:42am
post #10 of 17

Sounds like there are a few different ways of doing this. I've done it many many many times in the past it is a regular order in my shop. I use a quick gancage with a 1:3 ratio. Weigh out your 1xchocolate( i use dark compound) then add 3x boiling water. Use a whisk and beat it til it's all smooth. You will notice some bubbles in the mix. Bang the bowl on the bench to help the air bubbles come to the top. Gentle stir though with a spatular to help get the airbubbles out. You can always reheat in the micro if you need to. Getting the air bubbles out is the key to getting the smooth look. Get a small portion of the ganache and spread it out onto a plate so it hardens quickly. Use this to smooth over the cake like crumb coating. Your surface must be as good as you can get it. Now put your cake onto a wire rack over a tray and pour the ganache liberally over the cake making sure you coat all sides. You can gentle tap the rack on the bench to help it run off the cake evenly. Leave it to drip for a while. I never touch the ganache with anything and use it while it is still warm. Once it has gone cold you wont get the same shine. I use the overspill to decorate. Put it in a pipping bag and do what you will. I hope this helps. Good Luck. I tried to upload a photo for you but the file is to big. Sorry

minicuppie Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 1:06pm
post #11 of 17

Before applying a crumb coat (and that is what you are doing, a crumb coat) all the lumps and bumps need to be trimmed from the cake. Then proceed with all the excellent info the other cakers provided.

meharding Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 1:26pm
post #12 of 17

Thanks for the info and the link. The tutorial is awesome. Learning is easier with pictures...lol. Gonna go whip some of this up this morning. Thanks again!

awestervelt Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:07pm
post #13 of 17

I can't wait to go home and spend some time reading that post. I find the search engine on here very difficult to use because I can never find anything I'm looking for.

meharding Posted 28 Jun 2010 , 2:21pm
post #14 of 17

I have better luck with going to Google and doing a search using cake central, i.e., topsy turvy tutorial cake central...

fishabel Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 10:49am
post #15 of 17

Sorry I was just thinking about this question when I realised that I did the ratio around the round way. So sorry . It's 3 parts chocolate to ! part boiling water. Such a twit. Sorry about that.

awestervelt Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 4:36pm
post #16 of 17

Fishabel: You use water instead of heavy cream?? I was just wondering cause I have always heard of using cream.

fishabel Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 9:00pm
post #17 of 17

Yes, It's still delicious. I hope you got my message about the ratio. See here in Australia I usually do 1500grams compound chocolate to 500ml of boiling water. 1 ltr of water equals 1 kg in weight so when you measure it do it all by weight on your scale. 3x parts chocolate 1x part water. This has worked a treat for me for a long time. Doing this in my business it also helps with keeping time so I can make it up in bulk. I'll upload a photo into my photos to give you an idea of what it looks like. Just go to fishabel then view all my photos. I'm sure the cream way would be yummy too. All the best.

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