Help Please! I Need A No Fail Fondant Recipe That Is Tasty.

Baking By pbuttercwup Updated 1 Jun 2010 , 12:55am by mamawrobin

pbuttercwup Posted 28 May 2010 , 9:33pm
post #1 of 13

I have tried making marshmallow fondant 4 times (with just the icing sugar and the marshmallows) and it always comes out too dry and rips and I have never come close to adding all the icing sugar. I am not sure where I am going wrong but I need a really yummy, easy homemade fondant that doesnt contain crazy ingredients. Please share. I need to make a cake for next saturday and do not want to lose my mind with the MMF. Any help is appreciated.

12 replies
costumeczar Posted 28 May 2010 , 9:55pm
post #2 of 13

This is a basic one that works well: http://www.cakesbyjudi.com/fondant.htm

icedbycarrie Posted 28 May 2010 , 10:00pm
post #3 of 13

i had the same problem when i made MMF. i switched to satin ice and will never go back! icon_smile.gif

emiyeric Posted 28 May 2010 , 10:02pm
post #4 of 13

I swear by Michele Foster's Fondant (on this website), I've done it forty billion times and it is WONDERFUL. Not to mention, delicious. icon_smile.gif

emiyeric Posted 28 May 2010 , 10:26pm
post #5 of 13

Also, the manageability of it has always been AWESOME. I can model figurines, cover cakes, do anything I want with total reliability.

Marianna46 Posted 28 May 2010 , 10:42pm
post #6 of 13

I agree with emiyeric about Michele Foster's fondant. I generally use Fondx and Satin Ice, but if you really need a homemade recipe, MFF (as opposed to MMF) is the best one I've come across and the easiest to manage. I've never tried her new version, but the original one is just wonderful, and the last time I looked, they were both on here.

mamawrobin Posted 28 May 2010 , 11:38pm
post #7 of 13

Another vote for Michele Foster's Fondant. It's "hands down" my favorite for taste, quality and workability. I've never had good results with mmf either. I make Michele's recipe several times a week and my favorite is the white chocolate. The chocolate seems to make it even more pliable.

mygirlssweet Posted 29 May 2010 , 12:15am
post #8 of 13

How does the milk products not spoil? Someone told me it would even with the amount of sugar.

Marianna46 Posted 30 May 2010 , 11:54am
post #9 of 13

I generall make Michele Foster's fondant without the dairy (the original recipe), but I've made the new one a time or two, as well. I don't know the science of why the milk products don't spoil in this, but they don't. My kitchen is 88F and above almost every day, and even so I have no problems. Refrigeration is out of the question, because of the condensation that forms when I bring the fondant back to room temp. It MUST be the sugar content, because I've had boiled-milk buttercream (which has a lot less sugar in it) go bad in less than a week when left out - but even that was okay for three or four days without refrigeration.

mamawrobin Posted 30 May 2010 , 12:31pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mygirlssweet

How does the milk products not spoil? Someone told me it would even with the amount of sugar.




That "someone" is wrong. Threre is a thread titled "icing" that you can read and Doug gives the scientifics on why milk doesn't "spoil" in icings, etc. I can't find the link to it maybe someone else can.

I make Michele Foster's recipe about 3 times a week and never refrigerate it. It doesn't spoil. thumbs_up.gif

pbuttercwup Posted 31 May 2010 , 8:36pm
post #11 of 13

I made the Michele Fosters fondant and I used her first recipe (not the revised one) and It is too dry. I wish I would have seen the other recipe that is a little more precise with the sugar measurement. It was a little vague on how much to add. Oh well I will try and make it work as best as I can. I think on one of the recipes it mentioned adding glycerin to small batches to make it more pliable. thanks again.

Marianna46 Posted 31 May 2010 , 9:44pm
post #12 of 13

I always leave about the last two cups of powdered sugar out of the kneading process when I make fondant. The amount the recipe needs depends on so many things (the humidity, which way the wind is blowing, my hormone levels, who knows what) that it's hard to know before hand just how much it takes to get the consistency you want. I'm sorry I didn't remember to say that when I was extolling the virtues of MFF, but it's actually true of any fondant. I also add some orange or lemon extract - citrus extracts give the fondant a really good flavor and make it seem less cloying. I hope you'll want to try it again sometime.

mamawrobin Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 12:55am
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbuttercwup

I made the Michele Fosters fondant and I used her first recipe (not the revised one) and It is too dry. I wish I would have seen the other recipe that is a little more precise with the sugar measurement. It was a little vague on how much to add. Oh well I will try and make it work as best as I can. I think on one of the recipes it mentioned adding glycerin to small batches to make it more pliable. thanks again.




I start with about 2 1/2 pounds and add only until I can stick my finger in the fondant as it's kneading and none sticks to my finger. I rarely use any more than 3 pounds.

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