Refrigeration Issues Destroying My Cakes - Please Help

Business By Crustymuffin Updated 14 May 2010 , 3:34am by mamawrobin

Crustymuffin Posted 13 May 2010 , 3:31pm
post #1 of 11

I' m in Austin TX = Hot and Humid most the time. I have not had any luck refrigerating any of my cakes once they are finished. All of my cakes are covered in Fondant or modeling Chocolate. If I refrigerate them they will bubble/blister and sweat as they come to room temp and humidity. The sweating I can handle/fix but the bubbling and blistering just kills the cake. I wish I could refrigerate to 60deg but it is a True refrigerator and holds 38 deg temp.

Biz is Growing and I need to solve this problem to handle additional orders.

Do any of you have similar issues or a remedy to mine?
Thanks in advance,
Crusty

10 replies
l80bug79 Posted 13 May 2010 , 3:43pm
post #2 of 11

I remember seeing in a post about a special "dry" fridge for fondant cakes. I haven't researched it yet.

BeanCountingBaker Posted 13 May 2010 , 3:46pm
post #3 of 11

I don't know about Texas, but in my area you can cool a small room to 60 degrees with a window air conditioning unit. My husband is always hot, and we installed a small unit in our bedroom in a house we once lived in and I had to start going to bed in sweats because it would get down below 65 degrees in there.

mamawrobin Posted 13 May 2010 , 3:52pm
post #4 of 11

I live in Arkansas so I have the same weather conditions as you. I never refrigerate any of my cakes. I don't make any perishable fillings so there is never a reason for me to do so. I keep my house very cold (huge electric bill) because I cannot stand being hot. My cakes do fine out of the fridge.

Loucinda Posted 13 May 2010 , 3:55pm
post #5 of 11

I do the same as mamaarobin....I never refrigerate any cakes....they are all room temperature stable. I keep the house cool in the summer so that helps. This has worked perfectly for me....along with delivery - no worrying about the cake condensation or sweating or slipping after coming to room temp. The cakes are already at room temp, so I don't have any of those issues.

Crustymuffin Posted 13 May 2010 , 4:17pm
post #6 of 11

To avoid this issue Right now I'm keeping them at Room Temp too. The problem I am running into is that the volume I need to produce is going up. To keep them Fresh I do them at the last minute. The Cakes I do take an min of 5 hrs and a go up to 30-50hrs on the high side. I can't do 2-3 15hr cakes in one day. I just build this commercial Kitchen and the commercial oven will warm the room up 5-10 deg. I really do not want to leave a cake out for 2-3 days.

TexasSugar Posted 13 May 2010 , 4:24pm
post #7 of 11

What is going to happen to them in 2 days?

There are many people that bake on Wed/Thursday and decorate Friday for a Saturday cake. There are also people that bake Mon/Tues, freeze the cake then pull it out Thurs/Friday to ice and decorate.

I'm in Texas to, and while I didn't do this for a living, I avoid putting cakes in the fridge for the same issues you are facing. You can't take anything out of the fridge for more than 5 seconds with out it forming condesation.

Crustymuffin Posted 13 May 2010 , 4:40pm
post #8 of 11

Sculpted cakes can settle in 2 days, and or fillings bleed out a little.

TexasSugar Posted 13 May 2010 , 4:43pm
post #9 of 11

All cakes settle after you make them. That is why it helps to torte, fill, crumb coat and let it sit for a while or over night, before actually icing them.

The fridge keeps the cakes/icing firm, but only until they come to room temp.

itsacake Posted 14 May 2010 , 12:09am
post #10 of 11

I just put in a walk-in and the company was able to put in a slightly smaller evaporator so it will be less humid than normal. This is supposed to keep the cakes from sweating when you take them out. You might try talking to your refrigerator person as to whether something similar would work for you. I was told you can also purchase a refrigerator de-humidifier. I think they said they are not horribly expensive.

I haven't refrigerated my finished cakes up to now, but hope this might make it possible in the future.

Here is a link to a thread where classiccake answered my similar question.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=667757&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&s

mamawrobin Posted 14 May 2010 , 3:34am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

All cakes settle after you make them. That is why it helps to torte, fill, crumb coat and let it sit for a while or over night, before actually icing them.

The fridge keeps the cakes/icing firm, but only until they come to room temp.




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