Are The Cakes In My Area Recessionized???!!

Business By Exoticakes Updated 5 May 2010 , 12:15am by Katiebelle74

Exoticakes Posted 1 May 2010 , 8:32am
post #1 of 10

Recently I was browsing cake businesses in my area and they seem to be fairly cheap compared to the high quality they offer. Is this just a figment of my imagination or should I consider lowering my current prices since I know my work would be considered substandard to the competition? Please help! THX! :/

9 replies
Rose_N_Crantz Posted 1 May 2010 , 9:02am
post #2 of 10

I know my grocery store has been getting more and more orders lately. But they all come to us with a design in mind that you guys could easily do. It's tough having to educate them that they're not going to get a BMW on a Honda budget.

My opinion is that you should try to have something your competition doesn't have. If I knew my work was better than the others in the area, I wouldn't lower my price. If I wasn't, then I would price accordingly. Then you'll get slightly more orders, therefore more practice, get better and then you'll be able to raise prices.

minicuppie Posted 1 May 2010 , 1:08pm
post #3 of 10

I am starting to see a lot of package deals offered. Standard cake, buttercream/jam filling, simple decoration. No add ons. They pickup. It seems to appeal to the in between crowd. So, IMO don't lower your prices (especially if business has not dropped off) but offer something they can afford until their "situation" reverses. I am not advocating sheet cakes with bettercream (God forbid) and bright piping that stains your tongue. Just one of our regular delish cakes, some yummy filling, beautifully iced in buttercream and ladies, you are done. Maybe have them bring some ribbon and we apply it. No FUBARS here! Also nothing above 3 tiers that they will probably drop getting out of the car.

karenm0712 Posted 1 May 2010 , 1:23pm
post #4 of 10

I know what you mean! I have price quoted several times over the past month and have not gotten one order. I am not the most expensive in my area, but defintely pricer than the grocery store. I understand that people will not always be able to afford me, but I just don't get a response - it's like I never sent them the darn email! So tired of wasting my time...but I know that this comes with the territory... still though, a simple email with "thanks, but no thanks" would be nice...some of these quotes are from people I know! ARGH.

mamawrobin Posted 1 May 2010 , 3:26pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

I know my grocery store has been getting more and more orders lately. But they all come to us with a design in mind that you guys could easily do. It's tough having to educate them that they're not going to get a BMW on a Honda budget.

My opinion is that you should try to have something your competition doesn't have. If I knew my work was better than the others in the area, I wouldn't lower my price. If I wasn't, then I would price accordingly. Then you'll get slightly more orders, therefore more practice, get better and then you'll be able to raise prices.




I agree with Rose. If your work is better than others in your area, don't lower your price. If not, price accordingly.

You also need to offer something that the competition doesn't. If your trying to sell sheetcakes for $4.00 a serving you're never going to get business when they can go to the grocery store or wal-mart and get a sheet cake for less than $1.00 per serving.

Exoticakes Posted 2 May 2010 , 12:07am
post #6 of 10

Well, I am just about a novice to the business. I offer some of the most unique flavors and delicious tasting cakes that I have ever encountered. But, my decorating skills could potentially hurt my business in a severe way. I am in nursing school right now and am trying to find a decorating class that is not during those hours...unsuccessful so far. I just don't want to waste a bunch of cake trying to be self taught....any advice? I need to build clientele and not be pushed to the side for WALLYWORLD! lol

Texas_Rose Posted 2 May 2010 , 2:12am
post #7 of 10

You could buy some styrofoam cake dummies and practice decorating them, or practice piping on a cookie sheet or an upside-down cake pan.

If your flavors are where you shine, why don't you specialize in cupcakes for your paid orders, until you get enough practice on cakes? It doesn't take much skill to pipe the swirl on a cupcake. Build a website where you describe all of your flavors, and once you have a clientele built up, advertise a seasonal flavor each month as well.

Exoticakes Posted 2 May 2010 , 3:21am
post #8 of 10

Thx so much for the advice! You are right...my cupcakes really shine on their own! But, my best seller can only be made in a cake form because of the way it is prepared. icon_sad.gif I need a home tutor 101 I think! lol Are there any really cheap icings that you know of that I can practice with? Just curious.

mamawrobin Posted 2 May 2010 , 6:46am
post #9 of 10

I use Indydebi's buttercream receipe. It's not expensive to make and it's the perfect consistency to work with. Good luck to you. I'm self-taught and if I can do it anyone can icon_lol.gif

There are some great tutorials on youtube.

Katiebelle74 Posted 5 May 2010 , 12:15am
post #10 of 10

Like the suggestion of a 3 tiered cake basic design, basic filling they pick up. Had been sort of toying with the idea of a couple simple basic designs at a set price but this gives that whole idea more direction! This economy is making high end cakes a harder sell.

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