Wedding Cake Advice

Decorating By k_mun Updated 24 Apr 2010 , 6:24pm by tonedna

k_mun Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 4:15pm
post #1 of 14

Hi All.
A newbie here....I have been baking regular cakes for several years now. I have baked large single cakes for birthday parties. A couple I know wants me to bake them a wedding cake.
The cake will be 4 tiers . Each tier will have 2 layers filled with fruit and cream cheese and frosted generoulsy with neo classic buttercream.
Covering each tier will be marshmallow fondant.
I am looking for any advice, suggestions.

Thanks.

13 replies
leily Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 4:33pm
post #2 of 14

what are you looking for advice on?
- timeline?
- stuctrual support?
- flavors?
- recipes for certain flavors?

there is a lot to a tiered cake, can you be more specific? and if you're looking for all of that information that's ok too, just want to make sure you get what you're looking for.

k_mun Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 4:43pm
post #3 of 14

To be more specific, I guess I would like to know how structurally sound a tiered cake built on neo classic buttercream and marshamallow fondant would be? Would the buttercream cause the tiers to become unstable at room temperature? Would they slip and slide under the buttercream?

I am also planning on using syrup to make the baked layers moist. Is this advisable for tiered cakes? Would this affect their integrity?

About the fondant....I have heard that when MMF is exposed to air it dries out quickly. How do I keep this from happening once the fondant is on the cake and exposed?

Thanks.

indydebi Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 5:15pm
post #4 of 14

The icing has nothing to do with the structural integrity of the cake. The cakes are held in place by your support system (wooden dowels, bubble straws, SPS system, etc.) So cross that one off of your "List of things to worry about!" thumbs_up.gif

I've been a 30-year buttercream-only wedding caker and no tiers have ever slid off because of the icing. thumbs_up.gif

DeeDelightful Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 5:33pm
post #5 of 14

I think as long as you bake your layers a day or so in advance, assemble your tiers, ice, fondant and let the cakes settle at least a day, you should have a pretty stable cake once you stack it. I'm not familiar with neo classic buttercream, so i don't know the consistency of it. Don't overdo the fruit filling (just a thin layer should do), so that your layers don't slide off of one another. Read up on SPS and structural supports for tiered cakes and decide what's best for you. Study Cake Central and you will learn more than you ever wanted to know.

all4cake Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 5:35pm
post #6 of 14

Neoclassic buttercream(aka french meringue buttercream aka egg-yolk buttercream) is as reliable as any other buttercream I've made...that shouldn't be a problem at all ( I would recommend chilling it before covering with fondant (see tips in the forums about using fondant on IMBC or SMBC).

Brushing the layers with a syrup shouldn't cause you any heartache either unless you saturate them so much that they disintegrate.

The fondant will be fine...due to its' contact with the buttercream, it will remain moist underneath...the outside will dry but not like dry and crumbly type dry...just not be tacky...all while helping to keep your layers moist longer.

Like indydebi said, as long as your support system is good...you shouldn't have to worry about your cake going anywhere (unless you travel with it assembled, taking 50 mph corners without center staking it...)

k_mun Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 7:29pm
post #7 of 14

Awesome advice! Thanks everyone. I'll be back with more questions once I make the test cake.

cheatize Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 12:36am
post #8 of 14

It looks to me like the bigger problem may be the fruit and cream cheese plus the addition of fondant. It sounds like it will have to be refrigerated and that may make the fondant sweat.

k_mun Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:05am
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

It looks to me like the bigger problem may be the fruit and cream cheese plus the addition of fondant. It sounds like it will have to be refrigerated and that may make the fondant sweat.




cheatize,
So does that mean MMF should never be refrigerated? The filling is actually pie filling plus cream cheese. Even if I did not use the filling the neo classic buttercream itself would require refrigeration. So, I have to be able to refrigerate the cake with the fondant. How do I keep the MMF from sweating in the refrigerator?

Thanks.

prterrell Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:08am
post #10 of 14

Yes, the filling and icing you have chosen BOTH require refrigeration.

You should check out the SPS for the internal support structure. It is very easy to use, inexpensive, and much more stable than dowels and cardboard rounds.

leily Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:10am
post #11 of 14

I have refridgerated MMF quite a few times without a problem. It won't sweat in the fridge, if it sweats it will be when you take it out and it is warming up. If it does sweat just make sure you don't touch it until it's dry (or the finger marks will stay on there) DON"T cover it up while it is warming up, it just makes the sweating worse, it needs the air so it can dry out.

Now, I have put satin ice in the fridge and have a 50/50 chance of it sweating, it has a lot to do with the temperature where it is warming up though. Not sure where you're at or what the weather is right now.

leah_s Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:15am
post #12 of 14

Frankly I'd really, really rethink the cream cheese int he filling ans the neo classical buttercream. Cakes that have to be refrigerated are problematic for wedding cakes. (95% of my business is wedding cakes.) Your cake can only be outside of refrigeration for four hours - and that includes mixing the filling and icing, decorating, display time and then serving. My bet is that the cake would technically have to be thrown out before it was even served.

Also, SPS is the way to go for a support system. You can totally take the cake assembled, (if you can lift it) drive at normal speeds and take corners as you normally do. It's not going anywhere. That whole center stake is false security.

k_mun Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 5:47pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Frankly I'd really, really rethink the cream cheese int he filling ans the neo classical buttercream. Cakes that have to be refrigerated are problematic for wedding cakes. (95% of my business is wedding cakes.) Your cake can only be outside of refrigeration for four hours - and that includes mixing the filling and icing, decorating, display time and then serving. My bet is that the cake would technically have to be thrown out before it was even served.




Leah,
Thanks for the advice.
I could omit the cream cheese from the filling, but there is no way I will serve my customer shortening or sugar based buttercreams, it has to be a meringue/egg based buttercream. That's the reason people buy my cakes.

I have worked with meringue/egg based buttercream for large birthday parties. I let the cakes thaw partially and then transport them to the party and let thaw completely at the venue by the time they need to be cut.
Of course these weren't covered in fondant.

Is there anyone on this board that has experience using meringue/egg based buttercreams for wedding cakes? Please chime in....

tonedna Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 6:24pm
post #14 of 14

I agree with Leah. My cakes are 99% weddings. Cakes with syrups can be stacked, but a cake with lots of
it can become really unstable.
Edna icon_smile.gif

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