Charging For Bridal Consultations....

Business By sweetlayers Updated 28 Mar 2010 , 4:25am by sweetlayers

sweetlayers Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 1:32am
post #1 of 6

In these tough economic times, it seems unfair to charge brides for consultations.

However, when I do the math, it doesn't seem fair that I should have to pay for them everytime either. (samples, gas, excessive amounts of time, etc)

So my question is, when a bride pays a small fee for the consultation, are they more likely to book? Or are they more likely to not schedule a consultation at all.

I'm mean, I'm not trying to be a "suchy much" decorator, but these consultations are getting expensive!

Please share you thoughts!

5 replies
antonia74 Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 1:37am
post #2 of 6

You can advertise that you bake all the samples fresh and consultations are for serious inquiries with orders over $____ amount, let's say.

So charge them a small fee like $20 for a private one-on-one consultation with various freshly-baked samples to taste/take home.....and apply that $20 fee to any order over $___ if and when they book you.

In these tough economic times, it's not realistic to give your time, labour, ingredients, etc away for free either! icon_cool.gif

prterrell Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 5:12am
post #3 of 6

Business ain't about "fair". A consultation takes up your time and product. The customer is receiving a service and product. Therefore the customer pays for said service and product. You're running a business, not a charity.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 11:26pm
post #4 of 6

IndyDebi has brought this up in a couple of other threads, and I think it's such good advice I felt compelled to share it here.

You mentioned "in these tough economic times". We all might be tempted to offer a sale or discount to get the client to book. Just to get some business right? A better idea is to offer something else along with a booking, not a discount or free consultation. Debi's example was chocolate covered strawberries. Chocolate covered strawberries are relatively cheap for us to make, but the retail value is higher. So you can advertise that weddings booked from X date to Y date will receive a dozen chocolate dipped strawberries for the head table, a $28 value (i'm pulling numbers out of the air here). For sake of argument, that dozen strawberries could cost you 6 bucks. A discount of say 10-15% could cost you up to $100.

What would you rather offer?

In summary, don't discount, add value.

heavenlys Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 1:51am
post #5 of 6

If my bride books us with a deposit she gets a free tasting. If she wants the tasting before the booking she pays $25. If she then books with us her fee is applied to her deposit.

I find this helps stop girls that think a tasting would be "fun" icon_rolleyes.gif

sweetlayers Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 4:25am
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

IndyDebi has brought this up in a couple of other threads, and I think it's such good advice I felt compelled to share it here.

You mentioned "in these tough economic times". We all might be tempted to offer a sale or discount to get the client to book. Just to get some business right? A better idea is to offer something else along with a booking, not a discount or free consultation. Debi's example was chocolate covered strawberries. Chocolate covered strawberries are relatively cheap for us to make, but the retail value is higher. So you can advertise that weddings booked from X date to Y date will receive a dozen chocolate dipped strawberries for the head table, a $28 value (i'm pulling numbers out of the air here). For sake of argument, that dozen strawberries could cost you 6 bucks. A discount of say 10-15% could cost you up to $100.

What would you rather offer?

In summary, don't discount, add value.





Yeah, I read this thread the other week. However, I did not draw an instant connection to this scenario. Thanks for redirecting me there.

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