Ruth Rickey's Twiddling?

Decorating By nannie Updated 15 Dec 2011 , 4:38am by Annabakescakes

nannie Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 3:43pm
post #1 of 30

I took a demo last year at ICES with ruth rickey and she showed a method of attatching a wire to the gumpast flower she called the "twiddle method"

she worked a small bit of cp down the wire (I get that part) but now I can't remember the next step. How did she attach the wire to the petal?

Is anyone familiar with this technique? Please help

thanks

29 replies
TexasSugar Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 5:27pm
post #2 of 30

Oh Nannie, Hi! icon_smile.gif

After she twiddled (does anyone else have bad thoughts at that word?) she played the wire on her veiner and laid the petal over it. When she pressed the veiner together it attached the wire to the petal. I can't remember if you need a little gum clue of not. If if the gum paste is still soft/tacky you probably don't.

BlakesCakes Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 3:15am
post #3 of 30

You can learn more about the method--developed by Lin Cook of the UK--in the book, "Softly-Softly by Lin Cook". \\

It's a wonderful method to use with Platinum paste, or the flower paste by Marcela Sanchez.

It can work with other gum/flower pastes, but you have to be very careful to keep the "twiddle" moist and pliable.

HTH
Rae

nannie Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 4:39am
post #4 of 30

Texas !!!

I forgot you were at that demo 2
Yes, it is a weird word.......... icon_razz.gif



thanks to you both , I'll give it a try

TexasSugar Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 6:51pm
post #5 of 30

I've also seen Beth Parvu (I think that's it) do it in a demo at ICES too. I think I like it better than trying to stick the wire in the vein of the petal.

costumeczar Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 7:14pm
post #6 of 30

I'd apparently been doing the "soft method" and "twiddling" for years without knowing that it had been "invented" by someone else, ha ha ha ha ! The chef in my culinary program did flowers like that long before it was a so-called new method. Either that or I came up with it on my own since it's pretty intuitive. I did a semi-tutorial on my blog that has photos of the smushing-in-the-press process. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2010/02/quick-daylilies-well-relatively-quick.html

Can I say that I developed the "smushing-in-the-press" process since I gave it a different name? icon_wink.gif

TexasSugar Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 7:42pm
post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Can I say that I developed the "smushing-in-the-press" process since I gave it a different name? icon_wink.gif




Sure. icon_wink.gif

Isn't it funny how things seem 'new' but has probably been done by many someone elses for a while?

sweetflowers Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 8:08pm
post #8 of 30

Yup, that always amazes me too. I've done that for 18 years now, learned from a lady from England, so who knows where she got it from.

It's the same for the icing bag cartridges (or whatever people call them now). Learned them 21 years ago at our cake club and I still see posts of this *new* idea... Shows the world is getting smaller icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 9:00pm
post #9 of 30

I guess you just have to be the first person to claim it as your invention!

nannie Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 10:10pm
post #10 of 30

Ok, I really need to clarify something here before it gets out of control.

I am the one who dubbed it Ruth Rickeys Twiddling method not Ruth.

I phrased it that way in hopes that would catch the attention of someone who had taken her class and would know to what I was refering.

Ruth is a lovely person who repeatedly praised the many teachers from all over the world who had taught her and would never claim someone else's work for herself.

My apologies for my poor selection of words.

costumeczar Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 11:02pm
post #11 of 30

Don't worry about it, I just always think it's funny that people refer to techniques to one person when they've been done all over the place for who knows how long.

It's like when someone was on one of the cake challenges and was doing something simple with fondant, and the judge asked them "did you think that up?" They answered yes, like they'd invented the method of pushing fondant around. Riiiiight you thought it up, you and thousands of other people.

bobwonderbuns Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 12:05am
post #12 of 30

Dianne Gruenberg is the queen of twiddling! icon_biggrin.gif You can see her at many of the ICES shows as well.

Peridot Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 2:02pm
post #13 of 30

Learned....well maybe that's not the correct word...was shown how to do twiddling at Jennifer Dontz's flower class in Michigan last year for the Alstroemeria that we made. Haven't done it since so I am glad to find some places that I can go to for a refresher on this process.

Hey Bobwonderbuns.....remember that???

TexasSugar Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 2:09pm
post #14 of 30

Nannie, I didn't take it as you meant that Ruth came up with it. And when I saw your title I knew exactly what you meant. No need to apologize.

nannie Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 2:32pm
post #15 of 30

no problem Texas, just wanted to clarify

milkmaid42 Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 3:23pm
post #16 of 30

It is the same as a person who asks for a recipe... What "started as Jan's chocolate cake" changes to the name of whoever passes it to the next...
(That's why in botany, or zoology etc. one goes by the scientific name-- genus-species-- instead of the common name which varies by time and location.) I know, TMI. Just thought it was interesting. Oh well.

weirkd Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 3:33pm
post #17 of 30

Hey Everyone! Ok to answer the question on twiddling (yah they need a better word for that one). You dont use any gum glue in the process. After you put a small piece of gumpaste on the wire you work down the wire between your thumb and first finger slightly pinching and pulling and turning the wire as you do it. Then you can either use a two sided veiner to sandwich the cut out petal/leaf on or a one sided veiner and a sponge. Press the two together and Voila!

TexasSugar Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 3:42pm
post #18 of 30

Milkmaid I think that is part of it. Another part of it is that we see something new and we think it is brand new when it is only new to us.

Or I could be sitting in my kitchen and come up with a new method on how to do something, and come here and post it and be told it's been done many of times over. I could have very well come up with it on my own, with out using outside help, but it shows that it is hard to come up with anything super brand new that no one else has thought of. Not saying it can't be done, but I think it happens less often now a days.

It is like people saying so and so copied my cake idea, when so and so actually did the cake before them, and when each of them did the cake they thought they were the ones to think up the idea orginally.

nannie Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 3:52pm
post #19 of 30

amen Texas, well said

milkmaid42 Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 4:07pm
post #20 of 30

Amen to the amen.

TexasSugar Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 4:24pm
post #21 of 30

icon_smile.gif

icer101 Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 4:53pm
post #22 of 30

i learned this method some years ago at the ices convention with beth parvu..... i love this method. i don,t have to use glue. make the g/p on the wire very thin though. you can never see the wire.

bobwonderbuns Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 12:43am
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peridot

Learned....well maybe that's not the correct word...was shown how to do twiddling at Jennifer Dontz's flower class in Michigan last year for the Alstroemeria that we made. Haven't done it since so I am glad to find some places that I can go to for a refresher on this process.

Hey Bobwonderbuns.....remember that???




I do!! icon_biggrin.gif I believe she learned it from Diane. For some reason I have it in my head that Diane "invented" this technique, but I could be wrong. I know it's the one she uses almost exclusively though. icon_smile.gif

dalis4joe Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 1:08am
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I'd apparently been doing the "soft method" and "twiddling" for years without knowing that it had been "invented" by someone else, ha ha ha ha ! The chef in my culinary program did flowers like that long before it was a so-called new method. Either that or I came up with it on my own since it's pretty intuitive. I did a semi-tutorial on my blog that has photos of the smushing-in-the-press process. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2010/02/quick-daylilies-well-relatively-quick.html

Can I say that I developed the "smushing-in-the-press" process since I gave it a different name? icon_wink.gif




AWESOME Tut.... u should do more... hint hint... hehehe

josumiko Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 1:22am
post #25 of 30

I learned this method on the last cake cruise from Norm Davis, who learned from Dianne. Funny thing about twiddling...besides that it's a funny word...Zane (who was helping in this class, as well as taught some of his own) said that the motion is like when you are trying to get a booger off of your finger! Just something that stuck in my brain icon_wink.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 1:24am
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by josumiko

I learned this method on the last cake cruise from Norm Davis, who learned from Dianne. Funny thing about twiddling...besides that it's a funny word...Zane (who was helping in this class, as well as taught some of his own) said that the motion is like when you are trying to get a booger off of your finger! Just something that stuck in my brain icon_wink.gif




icon_redface.gif Oh doesn't that just conjure up all kinds of lovely pictures... icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif

TDawgin Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 9:39pm
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannie

Ok, I really need to clarify something here before it gets out of control.

I am the one who dubbed it Ruth Rickeys Twiddling method not Ruth.

I phrased it that way in hopes that would catch the attention of someone who had taken her class and would know to what I was refering.

Ruth is a lovely person who repeatedly praised the many teachers from all over the world who had taught her and would never claim someone else's work for herself.

My apologies for my poor selection of words.




First off, there is no need for you to apologize. I too have had the honor of taking classes with Ruth and not only is she an excellent instructor, but she gives praise and acknowledgment to so many other in the industry. She is truly one of the most giving instructors in the industry!

It seems as though just because 'certain' people have a blog, they feel the need to go on a rant about the originality of certain terms or techniques used in cake decorating. It's really quite sad and shows the level of professionalism that they hold.

Thank you again for sharing and happy decorating!

TDawgin Posted 13 Dec 2011 , 9:55pm
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I guess you just have to be the first person to claim it as your invention!




Wow, really does it matter who invented it?! *shakes head* We should all feel privileged that there is instructors like Ruth, Norm and Zane out there willing to share the info and techniques that they have acquired, no matter where they originated. If any of these instructors claimed these techniques and/or ideas as their own, then one could see the problem..... but they never did!

Ruth is one of the most kind and generous instructors out there and gives infinite amounts of praise and acknowledgement to so many other instructors and decorators. If ever you have the opportunity, please take a class with her, I'm sure you would very much enjoy it!

Ballymena Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 2:11am
post #29 of 30

The new Wilton Course 4, Advanced Gumpaste Flowers, teaches this method.

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Dec 2011 , 4:38am
post #30 of 30

When my little brother was a baby and toddler, he would twist his hair around his finger and we called it twiddling icon_wink.gif fond memories... He is 27, taught himself fluent Japanese and put himself through engineering school! Oh, and not little either, 6'3"!! We are so proud icon_biggrin.gif

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