Ok...can't Find Bubble Tea Straw In My Area But

Decorating By mslesuer Updated 6 Mar 2010 , 12:13am by CakeMommyTX

mslesuer Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 3:48pm
post #1 of 28

I need some support for a cake due Saturday (and I don't want to use wooden dowels or SPS) so can I use regular drinking straws for support?
TIA

27 replies
Mug-a-Bug Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:10pm
post #2 of 28

How big is the cake you're stacking?

mslesuer Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:15pm
post #3 of 28

its 12", 8", and 6"

aej6 Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:17pm
post #4 of 28

I've used straws from Dunkin Dounts before and they worked very well!Wider than a typical straw...

KHalstead Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:18pm
post #5 of 28

You know I was at AC moore a few weeks ago and saw in the (BLECK) wilton stuff some big long plastic dowels that literally looked like white bubble tea straws. I believe there were like 4 or 6 in a pack for a couple dollars and they were around 12" long each! They seemed like tubing almost and were an opaque white. I think they were meant to be used as dowels but seemed like they'd be MUCH easier to cut than regular plastic ones because it was a thinner plastic.

I would be afraid of the plastic drinking straws not because they wouldn't be strong but because they're virtually the same size as the regular wooden dowels and the last time I used those I had a DISASTER! All because one of the wooden dowels got shifted askew and that's all it took to ruin a whole cake!

JustToEatCake Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:21pm
post #6 of 28

Lollipop sticks

tonedna Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:31pm
post #7 of 28

Mc Donalds straws are wider too.

Edna icon_smile.gif

tamyarm Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:36pm
post #8 of 28

too funny....i just went to mcdonald's this weekend and filled up my son's happy meal box with a ton of straws!!!!

PattyT Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:48pm
post #9 of 28

Any place that sells smoothies has the slightly bigger straws. Most places will give you a few. They're not at big as bubble tea, but bigger than standard straws.

I've used the Wilton ones khalstead mentioned - they're good too, but a bit harder to cut than snipping the straws.

CakeMommyTX Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:52pm
post #10 of 28

Is there not an Asian food market anywhere in your area?
That's where I get mine, a pkg of 50 for 79cents.

rachpizano Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:53pm
post #11 of 28

DO NOT USES LOLLY POP STICKS!! For one there so tiny you would need a billion of them to be in good and then you would ruin the cake because it would be impossible to slice without it falling apart. For two and most importantly they are paper. If they stay in the cake for any length of time they will absorb the moisture and grease and become weak. I would use wooden dowels or the plastic ones from Wilton. I dont like either but in a pinch they are ok.

aundrea Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:58pm
post #12 of 28

maybe use the smoothie straws and add a wooden dowel in them?
starbucks has wide straws too.
HTH

tonedna Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 5:26pm
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachpizano

DO NOT USES LOLLY POP STICKS!! For one there so tiny you would need a billion of them to be in good and then you would ruin the cake because it would be impossible to slice without it falling apart. For two and most importantly they are paper. If they stay in the cake for any length of time they will absorb the moisture and grease and become weak. I would use wooden dowels or the plastic ones from Wilton. I dont like either but in a pinch they are ok.





I agree with this..Even the wilton ones I find them too thin, but in a bind I would use. I prefer thicker ones.
Edna icon_smile.gif

JustToEatCake Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 5:58pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachpizano

DO NOT USES LOLLY POP STICKS!! For one there so tiny you would need a billion of them to be in good and then you would ruin the cake because it would be impossible to slice without it falling apart. For two and most importantly they are paper. If they stay in the cake for any length of time they will absorb the moisture and grease and become weak. I would use wooden dowels or the plastic ones from Wilton. I dont like either but in a pinch they are ok.



Toba Garrett uses lollipop sticks and if she has used them for years I doubt there'd be any problem.

cherrycakes Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 6:33pm
post #15 of 28

Do you have a convenience store that sells slurpies close to you? I have found some places where the straws are really big in diameter - I'm sure the guys behind the counter look at my daughter really funny when she has 10 straws stuck in her drink!!

mslesuer Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 8:10pm
post #16 of 28

Thanks everyone for the wonderful advice....its much appreciated! icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 12:09am
post #17 of 28

One of the really good reasons to use the Wilton plastic dowels or bubble tea straws is that the strongest type of support (in physics and engineering) is the hollow cylinder.

When you use a solid cylinder (wooden dowel, lollipop stick--and in moist cakes, these are a disaster waiting to happen because they DO absorb moisture and become weak, slip & slide easily, and are so thin that many are needed, thus destabilizing more cake), you run a huge risk of that support sliding due to horizontal sheer. Even if only ONE slides a little bit sideways, you can have a huge problem.

Hollow cylinders just don't slide easily. As long as they're cut evenly, they'll hold up very well under pressure.

Another consideration is that with wider dowels, you use fewer. The more holes you poke in the cake, the more you degrade the structure of the cake. With doweling, fewer wider dowels are better than lots of skinny ones.

For really large cakes of 3 tiers+, my preference is Wilton white plastic hidden dowels. For smaller cakes, I've used bubble tea straws and have been happy with the results.

HTH
Rae

Mug-a-Bug Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 12:48am
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

One of the really good reasons to use the Wilton plastic dowels or bubble tea straws is that the strongest type of support (in physics and engineering) is the hollow cylinder.

When you use a solid cylinder (wooden dowel, lollipop stick--and in moist cakes, these are a disaster waiting to happen because they DO absorb moisture and become weak, slip & slide easily, and are so thin that many are needed, thus destabilizing more cake), you run a huge risk of that support sliding due to horizontal sheer. Even if only ONE slides a little bit sideways, you can have a huge problem.

Hollow cylinders just don't slide easily. As long as they're cut evenly, they'll hold up very well under pressure.

Another consideration is that with wider dowels, you use fewer. The more holes you poke in the cake, the more you degrade the structure of the cake. With doweling, fewer wider dowels are better than lots of skinny ones.

For really large cakes of 3 tiers+, my preference is Wilton white plastic hidden dowels. For smaller cakes, I've used bubble tea straws and have been happy with the results.

HTH
Rae




Where can I get wilton's white plastic hidden dowels??? I wasn't too thrilled using boba straws on a 5 tier cake. Thanks.

BlakesCakes Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 12:56am
post #19 of 28

You can find them at most cake decorating stores, WalMart, Michael's, Joann, Hobby Lobby, ACMoore, online at Amazon.com and at Wilton.com.

Rae

Mug-a-Bug Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 1:01am
post #20 of 28

Thanks. Do you have to cut them with a saw?? (Sorry for all the questions)

BlakesCakes Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 1:05am
post #21 of 28

I cut them with a good serrated knife.

Rae

sweetsbyjen Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 2:25am
post #22 of 28

i've even used a small diametered pvc piping you can find that the home depot. clean of course then cut to size. more supportive than straws, sticks, or wodden dowels. Probably more expensive int he long run if tou used them for every cake, but since you sound like this is a special occasion it would be worth it. Get eh pvc cutters as welll, they are amazing and will save you time and frustration when you try to saw a dowel.

monet1895 Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 4:08am
post #23 of 28

Rae~

How many Wilton dowels would you typically use? I have a 3 tier coming up, 12"round, 8" square, 6" round.

Thx~
Shelley

BlakesCakes Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 4:16am
post #24 of 28

With the Wilton plastic dowels (or bubble tea straws), I use 1 per 2 inches of cake being supported.

With a 12/8/6, I'd put 4 in the 12" to support the 8" and 3 in the 8" to support the 6".

With wooden dowels, I use 1 dowel per 1 inch of cake supported, so in this case, 8 in the 12" and 6 in the 8".

HTH
Rae

monet1895 Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 4:24am
post #25 of 28

Thx much!

Mug-a-Bug Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 3:12pm
post #26 of 28

Great idea with the PVC pipe!! I wonder, is that food safe??

mcalhoun Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 4:36pm
post #27 of 28

Bronwen says PVC is food safe just run it thru your dishwasher first. That is what she makes her supporst from

CakeMommyTX Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:13am
post #28 of 28

My best roller is a a pvc pipe!

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