Brush Embroidery What Transfer Method Do U Use?

Decorating By wrightway777 Updated 20 Feb 2010 , 5:18am by wrightway777

wrightway777 Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 3:09pm
post #1 of 19

What method of transferring the design onto your fondant / gumpaste (etc) for RI or buttercream brush embroidery do you do:
A) the RI method (tube 1) on clear sheet...flip and press into the fondant?
or
B) scribing the paper traced design up against the fondant
or
C) first onto parchment tracing design in piping gel and then pressing that again the fondant
or
D) something completely different

If you do "B" what scriber do you use? Making do with what you have as gumpaste tools or going the 'hard ware store route' or 'art dept route'?
TIA

18 replies
joyfullysweet Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 3:19pm
post #2 of 19

I've never transferred brushed embroidery. I've always done it straight on the cake. There's a picture of one in my photos (yellow). It was a covered in buttercream (crusted and refrigerated for extra firmness), and then I piped on the buttercream borders and brushed.

I'd be interested in knowing if there was anyone who did this by transferring! Never heard of that!

LaBellaFlor Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 3:21pm
post #3 of 19

B and I have a scriber. You can also use cutters pressed into the fondant.

joyfullysweet Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 3:26pm
post #4 of 19

Duh...blonde moment! Now I get what you were saying. How do you transfer the image you want to brush! lol Sorry! icon_smile.gif I usually do mine free hand or with some time of cutter to make an impression.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 3:43pm
post #5 of 19

Just do it right on the cake. Be sure to get your brush really wet first.

Lee15 Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 6:10pm
post #6 of 19

Cutters are great. If you cannot find a cutter in the design you want, trace the design on a paper and you can pin prick it on the fondant then outline with icing.

LaBellaFlor Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:10pm
post #7 of 19

And free hand. A lot easier then you think.

dailey Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:18pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by joyfullysweet

I've never transferred brushed embroidery. I've always done it straight on the cake. There's a picture of one in my photos (yellow). It was a covered in buttercream (crusted and refrigerated for extra firmness), and then I piped on the buttercream borders and brushed.

I'd be interested in knowing if there was anyone who did this by transferring! Never heard of that!




i thought the same thing, lol!

a tip that was really helpful from Toba Garrett was to dip the brush in egg whites. made it sooo much easier. ♥

LaBellaFlor Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:20pm
post #9 of 19

Yeah, I never heard of the transferring either. I would thing that would be very difficult.

dailey Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:43pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by joyfullysweet

Duh...blonde moment! Now I get what you were saying. How do you transfer the image you want to brush! lol Sorry! icon_smile.gif I usually do mine free hand or with some time of cutter to make an impression.




oops! this is the paragraph i meant to quote!

ShanB Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 8:46pm
post #11 of 19

just a free hand or a cutter sometimes, but I usually just start drawing.

FullHouse Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 8:50pm
post #12 of 19

Toba Garrett also suggests tracing the back of the image with a #2 graphite pencil, placing the pencil side against the cake and going over it w/ a pencil or scriber so the pencil print is left on the fondant. I read it a few times, figuring I must be misunderstanding that she has pencil transferred to the cake, but that is what it says. Toba is and expert, but I still am left wondering if this is actually safe.

prterrell Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:08pm
post #13 of 19

The extremely small amounts of graphite aren't going to hurt anyone. That being said, I'm not going to go snack on a pencil or anything. icon_biggrin.gif

FullHouse Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:17pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

The extremely small amounts of graphite aren't going to hurt anyone. That being said, I'm not going to go snack on a pencil or anything. icon_biggrin.gif




Lol, why not? It might be a good replacement for all those calorie laden cake scraps I eat. icon_lol.gif

JustToEatCake Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 2:28am
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullHouse

Toba Garrett also suggests tracing the back of the image with a #2 graphite pencil, placing the pencil side against the cake and going over it w/ a pencil or scriber so the pencil print is left on the fondant. I read it a few times, figuring I must be misunderstanding that she has pencil transferred to the cake, but that is what it says. Toba is and expert, but I still am left wondering if this is actually safe.


I had the same experience when I read that. I read it, re-read it and read it again and thought "Well maybe that's a typo". I guess maybe not..

wrightway777 Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 2:31pm
post #16 of 19

yeah I knew about the pencil idea...its an old one but a little too wild for me. Hey honey whatcha doin? Oh I'm just snackin on a pencil.

Theres another method where you pin prick your stencil or outline through your wax or parchment paper.

The transfer method that I mentioned is literally taking a RI piping turning it over and pressing it onto the fondant. But I only seeing this working on a straight surface since obviously it would crack and break on a rounded one. I guess the advantage of this is that you would have a perfect indentation over and over again and possibly could store it away for a later 'impressioning.'

tx_cupcake Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 2:53pm
post #17 of 19

Here is an interesting tutorial on do-it-yourself impression mats. I know you can buy non-toxic "puff" paint, although it's probably not technically food safe.

http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/album/568298013CdussY

wrightway777 Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 11:02pm
post #18 of 19

Cool thats like the RI one but with puff paint. Neat! I looked at her other tutorials! Good grief they are cool too. Airbrushing plaid, puff border for cake platform.....awesome!

wrightway777 Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 5:18am
post #19 of 19

all - if you visit that last site be careful not to click a small popup system page that says something failed and wants you to click "ok" DONT do it. Its a virus and a bad one. I'm writing this on a different computer b/c the one that I did that (dumb move) is hosed right now and had to take it off our network.

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